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new shop challanges


gearhead204
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I want to loft one side, and hope to put a bridge crane in this will let me have either a top running or under slung crane and still have at least16 ft. of head room. Plus it allows me to put in windows just under the eves then lean to each side and have enough head room to get the other taller equipment under.

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as you can see the earth work was a real bitch, I got it close with the d45 komatsu then borrowed my buddy Rogers pc 220-7 ( sorry no pics) and over dug the foot print about 1 1/2 feet and got out all the BIGGER rocks but it still wasn't very user friendly! if you look in the 2nd photo (1st. posting) you will see my poor man sona tube a collection of nonreturnable 35 & 55 gal poly spray drums I hole sawed the bottoms then placed in gravel and put a 18x18x3 concrete pad for the post to sit on then filled with concrete the subgrade still has to come up about 14" then it will get a 6 " floor with a thickened edge I will also bore the posts and install rebar just for added strength and a frost barrier but that wont happen until spring, after the frost is out! I used over 30 yards of crushed rock just to back fill the post holed .......damn rocks .............f.....ing rocks ......aka sex stones :icon_bs:

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Its wood :blink: is some reason you used wood ? As a general rule nobody builds a shed out of wood in Australia to many white ants and not as strong as steel

I have been told there are more white ants in Australia than the rest of world combined dunno who counted them all :idunno: something to do with Australia not going thru the last ice age :idunno:

Looks like a good size shed my dad always says "a man can never have to many sheds"

Paul

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I have 2 buildings. 1 steel 42'x60' 14' door it was a Miracle Truss about 20 years old no problems. 2nd building is a pole barn 40'x60' 2-12' doors. no problem with this one either. Pole Barn was much cheaper and only took 3-days to complete by Dutchmen from Pa. very good workers. As Dirtymilkman said no ant problems here. Wood that is in contact with earth is treated. Joe D.

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Just a reminder...Gearhead had his pilot's license suspended indefinitely (after the PA incident at Mike's place) so he has no use for plane/runway or helicopter acess. :tease::banana:

BTW, Yardo...I never saw sprinklers in a machinery shed. Maybe there should be but then one would have to keep it heated to prevent freezing.

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Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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Just a reminder...Gearhead had his pilot's license suspended indefinitely (after the PA incident at Mike's place) so he has no use for plane/runway or helicopter acess. :tease::banana:

BTW, Yardo...I never saw sprinklers in a machinery shed. Maybe there should be but then one would have to keep it heated to prevent freezing.

That's what dry pipe systems are for......filled with pressurized air. Sprinkler head trips, air dumps which releases a check valve allowing water into the system.

TWO STROKES ARE FOR GARDEN TOOLS

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Pole Barn was much cheaper and only took 3-days to complete by Dutchmen from Pa. very good workers. As Dirtymilkman said no ant problems here. Wood that is in contact with earth is treated. Joe D.

As a building code official (coincidentally in Pa.) this is where knowing your stuff comes in handy. I issue permits for pole barns regularly. The trick with the new pressure treated lumber is knowing which type can be "in contact" and which can be "immersed into" the ground. .40 ACQ is the standard pt lumber, good for "contact." .60 is for immersion into water (like pilings for docks) or immersed into the ground. When I do a permit, and they want to immerse the 6x6's or 8x8's into the ground, I always question which type of ACQ it is.....and the amish guy applying for the permit always says "its pressure treated" and ends up walking away scratching his head when I deny the permit. Plus 90% of the time they just want to dig an 18" round hole, dump four bags of dry sackrete in and then sink the poles. No water, no nothing. I dont trust it so I make them get the plans signed by an engineer- which almost always NEVER happens, and the engineer makes them auger a 24" wide by 36" deep hole (the frost line here in this part of Pa.) and makes them fill it up to grade with delivered 3000psi concrete. Then they have then wet-stick a post base bracket for the poles before the concrete sets up.

TWO STROKES ARE FOR GARDEN TOOLS

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