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1955 H-61 1957 H-61 1958 H-63 1972 F-700

1934 CH 1933 MACK jr 30MT 1950's H-63 1959 N 1953 H-60 H-65

A friend  sent me this pic a couple  of  months  ago .  Guess this H-67 is still earning  it's  keep. Pretty cool in my book.  Al

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Grandpa's looks to be an Mack EB. There was also an EC model. I think this is an EB model because it appears to be a fairly heavy unit.

EB built between 1936-41 with 134 units built. EC built the same years with 123 made.

Boss Man's is a D model Mack. Probably a 20 or 30 built between 1955-1958.

Thanks Jim for the info!

There were some C models that used that cab,also,and later they had a LJU and LMU that also used that cab

Thanks Mike! Did the cabs lift straight up or tilt?

I like this one alot,Tim.

Mike PM Jeff and he may part with it ;)

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Boss Man's is a D model Mack. Probably a 20 or 30 built between 1955-1958.

If it's a 20 or 30 series extremely low production numbers. D-20 =124 , D-30 = 67 , D-42 = 601 , D-44 = 40

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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those D models had like an elevator lift type cab on them I think. I know where there is one of those LJ or ED or early CH cabovers in a junkyard, no wheels on it, sittin in mud up to the hubcaps, restorable, guy REFUSES to sell it.

post-6-0-64947600-1408238925_thumb.jpg

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Who made the first tilt cab.

I think it was Sterling.

They made an early COE with a mostly flat front and the floor over the wheels. And that was the first COE of the modern class 8 style I believe. I do not know if that one tilted though.

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Joe and Doug

I think (???) the first tiltable COE was the 1949-50 White 3000 with an electric screw jack. The LCF Diamond T built by the Murty Bros in 1952-3 used a counterbalanced coil spring to tilt the cab and this method was also copied into the full sized DT 921 COE. I have tilted mine by myself. Do not know who was the first to use a hydraulic jack??

Brocky

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Joe and Doug

I think (???) the first tiltable COE was the 1949-50 White 3000 with an electric screw jack. The LCF Diamond T built by the Murty Bros in 1952-3 used a counterbalanced coil spring to tilt the cab and this method was also copied into the full sized DT 921 COE. I have tilted mine by myself. Do not know who was the first to use a hydraulic jack??

Joe and Doug

I think (???) the first tiltable COE was the 1949-50 White 3000 with an electric screw jack. The LCF Diamond T built by the Murty Bros in 1952-3 used a counterbalanced coil spring to tilt the cab and this method was also copied into the full sized DT 921 COE. I have tilted mine by myself. Do not know who was the first to use a hydraulic jack??

Didn't the early F model mack have a spring setup to lift the cab also?

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The Sternberg company of Wisconsin (which became Sterling) produced cab-over trucks as early as 1907 and stopped COE about 1915. They reintroduced the cab-over layout undere the Sterling Name in 1933 with their "Camel Back" model G, which allowed the cab to be tilted to access the engine. It was a partial tilt cab with the windshield, dash and front cowl remaining stationary while the rest of the cab tilted back. Sterling did a full tilt cab in 1935.

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1933%20Sterling%20Camel%20Back_zpslwoulr

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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1935 Sterling with a Waukesha 6D-100 Century Comet Diesel and 1912 Lauth-Juergens designed by Magnus Hendrickson.

The 1935 is what the 1933 Camel back morphed into with full tilt.

L-J trucks was from Ohio.

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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  • 7 months later...
On 8/24/2016 at 11:26 AM, Adalius said:

Not to revive an old thread but I came across this and thought I'd chime in. I work for Hennes Services (formerly John Hennes Trucking) and my great great grandfather was John Hennes. I wanted to let you guys know that we still have the CH and the J, they both can be seen in the Milwaukee Labor Day Parade as part of Laborfest. One of the fun aspects of my job is being one of the few guys who fits in the CH I get to take it out and run it around the yard for a bit before we load it every year. There's also a ton of pictures on our Facebook company page. I've been going through boxes and boxes of photos, scanning them, and uploading them as I get time. So if you have Facebook feel free to look up Hennes Services, click on the photo albums link, and under Historic Photos you can see a ton of shots of the trucks and cranes we've had over the years.

Very cool,Adalius. Remember the Hennes  trucks well on my many trips through  Wisconsin.  The late Bill  Bedell's Flickr  page  also has some Hennes trucks on it.  Al  

IF YOU BOUGHT IT, A TRUCK BROUGHT IT..AND WHEN YOU'RE DONE WITH IT, A TRUCK WILL HAUL IT AWAY!!! Big John Trimble,WRVA

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