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Hi there... new poster/member with a question


local99
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Welcome, Mike! Lots of Mack info here, as well as fire apparatus. And no dumb questions, only dumb answers and dumber looks [emoji9]

Nice looking fire truck looks solid.

That would be a model E cab, a bit before my time, built sometime late '30s for about 10 years. Mack museum has awesome archives, if you send the serial number and a donation, you will get a wealth of info about your truck. Good luck and have fun!

Gregg

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Is that the Mack Museum in Allentown? We have another in Basking Ridge... I should check out both. So! I thought it was a B.... And did not know it was that old!

Would I be crazy to pay the 5 G's?

Thanks for the info... I am glad I found this site.

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Mike, welcome to the site. As suggested contact the Mack Museum with the serial number. They will be able to provide information on the truck. They will help you a lot, and making a donation helps keep the museum going. I don't know much about that year truck, but it does appear in great condition, and it runs. If you are not a member of SPAAMFAA please research and join. Most of the equipment you will need to outfit it is out there, you just need to find it. As far as cost - if it makes you happy it's worth it. Enjoy it, share questions, progress, and photos. Mark

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The Type 75 is a nice truck if it is powered by the ENF510A engine, a six cylinder overhead valve engine. It is the most powerful engine they used in those days.

Prices of antique fire apparatus is really driven by rarity, completeness, and condition. The Type 75's were the second highest production run of the E models with 393 built, so they are not all that rare. However, if it is a crew cab it is much rarer and worth more.

Condition is hard to tell from pictures, but I would put it at about 3 to 5 out of 10. It lacks gold leaf, a bell, and the paint looks rough. A bell will run you anywhere from $500 to $1K. Real gold leaf will go north of $5K; paint anywhere from $5K to 20K.

It appears the ladders and hard sleeves are missing, as well as most of the small tools. All of these can be easily found and should run you less than $1K.

If it runs correctly and it is a crew cab I would be comfortable paying $3K and if I really fell in love with it I would go the $5K. Just remember owning antique fire trucks are like owning a boat. No reasonable person ever bought a boat and planned on getting his money back, and you will not make money with this either. Buy it because you like it, want to have fun with it, and are willing to preserve it for the next generation, not as an investment.

Lastly, any antique fire truck must be kept indoors. if you do not have indoor storage do us all a favor and walk away so it doesn't die a slow undignified death rusting away in a back yard.

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Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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Congratulations and good luck with the truck. Having the brakes done already is a huge benefit. It is a neat looking trucks. We have a 1941 Type 55 open cab. It needs brake work or we would be running it around.

The Macks in Basking Ridge are a private collection owned by Gary Mahan. It is well worth the visit if you have never gone.

A donation in the $50-100 range is good. When you see what you get you might want to give more.

Mike

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wow,,,definately looks like a keeper....i would guess $3.000 would be fare thier not bringing in what cars do,,,,but there is alot there to work with,,,and the E,s are pretty rare...good luck,,,looks like a lotta fun to play with...and welcome aboard...bob

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Congratulations and welcome to the club. It is an ENF510A engine that should make it go pretty well.

Are the grab rails missing or were they never used?

I'd love to see pictures of the cab.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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fxfymn is exactly correct about you mack, I have a 54 LS 85 ,paid more than I should have, put more money in than I should have,but I would never part with it, it's like my child. but anyhow the body looks like a sedan model (more rare) Mack engines are strong and you have new brakes ,that's good. join spaafam and their is a great muster coming up in june in Jamesburg n.j. (exit 8a on the njtp) I'll be their with my mack , a lot of macks and others on display or pumping.

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Beautiful truck!

I agree with General Ike. The new trucks are loaded with technology, but just don't have the individual personalities and the ability to move you back in time like a vintage rig. Paul.

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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I'm thinking that it might be what Mack called a "Deluxe Cab". A sedan cab would have a rear seat accessed by two rear doors, one rear door on the right side, or a catwalk through

the hose bed. That "E" model doesn't have four doors or the catwalk; I can't tell if there is a rear door on the right side. In any event, it looks like a solid truck well worth owning.

I agree with General Ike; I started my career with semi-cab "L" models, rode the rear step on "B" models, wore rubber coats and orange, plastic gloves. Today's firefighters are

well trained and respond to all kinds of calls that we never even thought of but I would not trade my career for anything. Those memories, to me, are priceless.

bulldogboy

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I agree with Bulldogboy, I think that is a deluxe cab with a rear seat accessed through the officer's door but I'm not positive. Something about that truck is familiar, in particular the faired in lights and siren on the roof. The compartmentation is also unusual, inside mounted ladder and pike poles, the compartment door at the left rear looks like the double hinged type that frequently held a booster reel. I will have to locate my McCalls 100 years of fire apparatus, think that is where I saw it. C.R.S.

Anyway, nice truck! Hope you have many hours of pleasurable ownership. Much knowledge available here and in SPAAMFAA.

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