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fxfymn

Pedigreed Bulldog
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fxfymn last won the day on June 10

fxfymn had the most liked content!

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About fxfymn

  • Rank
    BMT Certified Know-It-All!
  • Birthday 10/04/1950

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
  • Interests
    Woodworking, Welding, Truck Restoration

Previous Fields

  • Make
    Mack
  • Model
    Type 75A Fire Truck
  • Year
    1952
  • Other Trucks
    1925 Mack AB Fire Truck (undergoing restoration)

Recent Profile Visitors

5,275 profile views
  1. Matt Pfahl had one at one time. You might give him a call.
  2. Thanks. Actually I do pretty well with the long ago; just don;t ask me what I had for breakfast today.
  3. Gary Mahan has had reproduction tanks made. Might be worth checking with him.
  4. "Red sold those B models to Joe Gringeri from Watertown when he closed up," Do you remember the year Red sold out?
  5. Nice rig I hope you get it on the road in time to make it to the September show in Winchester. If you are still looking to get the gold leaf done for the fenders I'd check with Larry Spangler in Hanover, PA. (717) 637-6990
  6. The pics are over 50 years old. The owner has long since passed on and I have no idea where the trucks ended up. But, I would not be surprised to find out that they are in someone's collection; probably with another paint scheme. I also assume the weight laws are a little stricter than they were back in the day. I don't think anyone is loading D-8 sized dozers on a single axle tractor these days like they did regularly when these were taken.
  7. Been a while since I have been on; the political silliness just got too much for me. But, I have been chasing down these pics for a while and they are a pretty good representation of what a New England style paint job looked like and they are very good looking trucks. Thanks to my former brother-in-law Bill Oke who drove for Wellesley Trucking and shared these pics with me. All of the pictures were taken from 1966 to 1969. He did not list the specific models, but the pics captions state the top pic is a 1949 LJ, the second LJ is a 1952, the B-81's are 1966, and the B-75 is not listed. The fleet was two LJ's, two B-81's, and one B-75. His business was moving construction equipment and as you can see some pretty heavy stuff went behind the single axle tractors. The low boys were all Rogers. The B-75 has a plow frame on, and all of the rigs were so equipped for snow season. The goose neck was detached from the trailer and used as weight when the rigs were used as a plow truck.
  8. No, but the sign made me wonder about why you would advertise that your children were slow.
  9. Sorry Paul, I did not mean that personally, just as a broad reference to what folks use as a standard reply. No offense intended. But I stand by my comments. Poor employee performance is not wholly the employee's fault, but is mostly a (poor) management issue.
  10. This is the antidote to all the naysayers who think this country is at the end of the line. A hard working kid who is willing to take a risk and make an idea work. I hope he is successful.
  11. Mike, open means that the wire is broken inside. A coil is just two wires wound around a core with one wire supplied by a 12v current that builds up a magnetic field. When the points open the field collapses and induces a higher voltage, lower amperage, current in the other wire which then goes to fire the spark plug. Based on the description my guess is the insulation on the primary wire has failed thus shortening the length of the coil and resulting in a weak spark. The tech should put an ohm meter across the leads to check for the proper resistance just to make sure it is the coil and not something else in the system. Try PMing Steelman. He has a few AC's and he bought NOS from dealers back in the day so you never know. His phone number is 540-373-5983. Ask for Carey. You can use almost any 12v coil, not just the one you have now. A smaller one like the ones used on cars and trucks from the 40's to the 70's should work. Ask Matt what coil he uses.
  12. I always think that it is pretty disingenuous to blame employees for failing to properly do their jobs when it should be up to management to make sure that happens. The "worker bees" who actually get stuff done do not set the organizational culture, management does. When the coach thinks its OK for a team member to show up late for practice it doesn't take long for everyone to start showing up late. Assuming the stories are true, which I doubt, If you go to lunch and don't come back then you don't get the opportunity to do it again. The inmates should never be able to run the asylum and real world actions should have real world consequences. And don't give me that crap about how the union would not let management do their jobs. That is just an excuse for a lazy manager who did not want to cross the "t's" and dot the "i's" to get the job done properly.
  13. I'm sure Gary Mahan will have one and Matt Pfahl probably has one as well. If not the first place I'd try is one of the shops that specializes in rebuilding magnetos. Push comes to shove an ignition coil is an ignition coil as long as the input voltage is 12v any coil will produce a spark. I assume you have checked for continuity and resistance in the coil to ensure it is actually open.
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