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Started my 44K Hub Pilot Conversion....


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I finally started my hub pilot conversion, kind of had to as you will see in the pics lol... Anyway a few questions for anyone who has done it as I cant seem to  get a concrete answer around here... My spoke hubs had the bearing spacers or washers that slide over the spindle and rest between the spindle shoulder and inner bearing, I was told both to use the spacer and not to use it UGH ! Here are my concerns, check out the pic there is clearly a huge difference in the offset of the bogeys, but will obviously equal out when I'm done, second, I wasn't overly thrilled with the short distance my Voyager seal slid onto the spindle shoulder but that said I've run the piss out of her for 2 days now and no leaking seal... Anyone who's been here please chime in ! I'll post the pics....

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Hmmmmmm, I don't know of anyone in Australia that has done this

Our 44's look different in Australia and have a big cone on the out side and a axle with a spline on each end that floats 

I do believe there is a large bush, spacer or washer on the inside of the inside bearing, goes between the bearing and the axle housing

I would use the brake shoe as a guid, if it's still sitting in the drum in the correct position I would call it good 

 

Paul

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I will be doing the opposite, changing hub pilots to 6 spoke daytons. I am told that the inner bearing on the spokes is smaller than on the budds and that there is not a bearing available to fit so I may have to have the spoke hub machined to accept a bigger race. What did you find regarding bearing sizes?. 

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LTK, what in creation possessed you to convert to spoke hubs ! There is nothing good on earth about spoke hubs except possibly nostalgia... The genius engineer that invented the spoke hub should have he or she's nut sack removed with a butter knife because that's about how it feels when you're done doing a brake job on spoke hubs ! 

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1 hour ago, Fastduramax said:

LTK, what in creation possessed you to convert to spoke hubs ! There is nothing good on earth about spoke hubs except possibly nostalgia... The genius engineer that invented the spoke hub should have he or she's nut sack removed with a butter knife because that's about how it feels when you're done doing a brake job on spoke hubs ! 

LOL. Understood. I never really liked daytons. However, I'm doing a B-61 and IMO, the steers on a B Model don't look right with polished budds and the daytons with the "Mack" script cap look really good to me so I'm sticking with the spokes. Putting a diff from a 2016 Freightshaker with air ride and have to covert them. Pretty sure I'm the only guy in history to change hub pilots to spokes. FWIW, my brother prefers spokes over hub pilots because they never come loose and they never crack. The only sad part is that to use the 8 bolt axles I have to use newer spokes that are somewhat square, not rounded like the ones that came on the B's. The chance of using the hubs that came with the truck with the 6 bolt axles on this much newer diff is pretty remote to say the least. I'll be running 10.00R20's in the rear (again, because the 20" rim just looks right on these trucks) and 11R22.5 on the steer (to eliminate the split ring AND because tires are easy to get). 

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1 hour ago, Fastduramax said:

LTK, what in creation possessed you to convert to spoke hubs ! There is nothing good on earth about spoke hubs except possibly nostalgia... The genius engineer that invented the spoke hub should have he or she's nut sack removed with a butter knife because that's about how it feels when you're done doing a brake job on spoke hubs ! 

Well I guess it depends on the part of the world you live in, I personally prefer them, quick to change, stronger than 10 stud bud rims and are pretty quick and simple to handle

 

Paul 

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When I slipped the air ride under my B, I converted the budds back to spoke to match the front axle.  I didn't want the mismatched look.  The yard I got the clip from gave me the spoke hubs.

If I ever find a budd hubs for the front I have the rear parts.

 

IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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I also like the idea of checking the hub position by observing relation of the drum to the shoes. The spacers/washers were definitely used to make correct hub fit. Too probably there were different styles of hubs used with that axle housing and there was a need of spacers in some wariations.

I once also met something like your situation when changed bearings on a MH-model. The axles were Mack on airride so I supposed they were 38000lbs. The hubs were spokes to fit 24.5 rims with Mack script cast on them. The bearings were 582/572 with 563/567 as it supposed to be for Mack axle of the spoken axle. But the seal was NOT 4-1/2 x 5-3/4 as it typically is (and should be) but 4-5/8x6. There were spacer sleeves pressed onto the spindle shoulder to increase the OD from 4-1/2 and I would expect that as a home made conversion. But the hubs were bored to 6 inch not 5-3/4. I too doubt someone machined the hubs for larger OD seals but who knows.

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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  • 1 month later...
On 7/28/2021 at 7:40 PM, Fastduramax said:

LTK, what in creation possessed you to convert to spoke hubs ! There is nothing good on earth about spoke hubs except possibly nostalgia... The genius engineer that invented the spoke hub should have he or she's nut sack removed with a butter knife because that's about how it feels when you're done doing a brake job on spoke hubs ! 

I had a blowout on a rear drive tire last week I couldn't drive on as the alligator was still half attached.  Was flapping around doing damage to the back of my truck body.  Had to have a pair of tires brought to me from the shop.  Way easier to tighten 6 spoke lugnuts than 10 Budd lugnuts with a cross wrench.

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On 7/28/2021 at 6:28 AM, mrsmackpaul said:

Hmmmmmm, I don't know of anyone in Australia that has done this

Our 44's look different in Australia and have a big cone on the out side and a axle with a spline on each end that floats 

I do believe there is a large bush, spacer or washer on the inside of the inside bearing, goes between the bearing and the axle housing

I would use the brake shoe as a guid, if it's still sitting in the drum in the correct position I would call it good 

 

Paul

I have seen 44's with both the "integrated flange" on the axle and with the "double splined" axle you describe.  Loved the look of the cone cap on the double splined setup.

Most of the Macks we had when I was a young man had the double splined axes, and we carried spare axle shafts in the cab with us.  Changed out one or two on the side of the road.  Sometimes getting the broken bit out of the rear could be a pain.  usually involved removing the other side and poking a broom handle through the carrier!

"Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines."

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I have never known a 44 Mack axle to break, even in roadtrain work I have never heard of it happening, extremely heavy  haulage type of work I have heard of it happening but never seen it

Learning something new everyday 

 

Paul

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On 8/31/2021 at 3:37 PM, mrsmackpaul said:

I have never known a 44 Mack axle to break, even in roadtrain work I have never heard of it happening, extremely heavy  haulage type of work I have heard of it happening but never seen it

Learning something new everyday 

 

Paul

Usually because some numbskull jerked on it too hard!  Really, really tough axles.  We also used Spicer U-joints, and carried a set of those with us.  You could do a lot of repairs on-site if you had a few spare parts.  All we had were spoke wheels, too.  So, they were super easy to change with basic hand tools.  Not as much torque required as on a disc wheel.

By the way, really enjoyed some of your last pics, Paul.

"Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines."

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