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1968 Mack R Tractor


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1 hour ago, tenfive0 said:

Belonged to __________ at the time and now is with __________, last I knew.

WE don't own them we are only renting them. Old Mack's never die they just get better.

Yup, very true.  We are only serving as a caretaker.

Jim

It doesn't cost anything to pay attention.

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16 minutes ago, 70mackMB said:

You think l could take that to work with me this week? And show the boss and them damn Volvos what a days work is. Without breaking down or having electrical and exhaust issues!    .....Hippy

Hippy, you would have a productive week!!!  No codes, no regens, no BS!

 

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Jim

It doesn't cost anything to pay attention.

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On 3/15/2020 at 6:45 PM, Ditchdiggerjcf said:

I have a buddy with an R on 22" dayton hubs. He is running lopro 24.5 rubber. It gives a good look.

I like the taller sidewalls of the 22" and 24" tube type tires myself. I have new 10.00RX22 rubber on my B-61 project and would purchase more if could be found. 

image.jpeg.2e1975db51a8d99a706bea5a770c8c03.jpeg

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Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Ditchdiggerjcf said:

I throw away all those old tube type. Nobody wants to deal with the split rims anymore. I know I don't. Something about the rubber in those old tires, they last forever. 

I thought "Tube type" just has a snap ring? And "Split rim" ment the rim was actually split all the way thru?  Correct me if im wrong

Remember if it's got a hood it's no good!

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44 minutes ago, ws721 said:

I thought "Tube type" just has a snap ring? And "Split rim" ment the rim was actually split all the way thru?  Correct me if im wrong

You're right, but some people loosely call tube type rims "split". A true split rim is actually split.

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Nothing really wrong with tube type tires; just need a bit of brains, and common sense to work with them. Many of the younger set lack these specific qualities and therefore the ability to think attempting to make up for the obvious with a poor rendition of snark rhetoric when in effect they make themselves appear as fools. 

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Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Not going to disagree with your methods as everybody does what works for them, but if one of my trucks had a flat, that was end of the work cycle until the matter was addressed. Didn't matter if tubes or not. I'm not a tire guy but trucks always carried hose, bottle jack, cribbing, impact wrench and socket set for the task, along with a spare tire. Never had driver's too good to change their own tires, nor would have.

Seen a lot of guys running as you suggest with both tube, and tubeless. Pickup a nail in say an outer dual, and worry about it later. At sometime they're sitting at the edge of the road and as you say "losing wages" awaiting a tire service truck to arrive, then paying that tire service guy to install two tires rather than one as the original problem was negated or minimized in priority.

Cannot say I really ever had many tire problems as always purchased decent quality up front, ran to about 25% and rotated them through as they had trade value with the tire dealer I used. I would pay "dead time" to my driver's also so there wasn't really any motivation to run equipment till failure which would have ultimately bitten into everyone's profit sharing offered at Christmas time. Never ran a mix of Budd, and Dayton hubs so the spare tire always fit the truck.

That's just kinda the way I did things over 10 years and was always profitable. Not suggesting it works for everyone, but maintaining is always cheaper than replacing to/for me.

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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A nail in tubeless is more than likely a slow leaker and can finish the day. A nail in tube type is flat in no time. It can't finish a day. 

One causes a truck to pull off the job, the other doesn't.

 

I've noticed most on this board are collectors so it really doesn't matter in that instance. Run what you like and what looks good to you.

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