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1956 B475CF


achiefire
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Most of the B models were delivered with 707 gas engines, but they also came with diesels and the smaller in-line Mack 6 cylinders. Any of them would be a good option.

If you want to modernize the rig I'd think about doing a Cummins 5.7 with a Mopar auto tranny.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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Here is a pic. Just some history on this vehicle. It served at a military base in the California desert. I rode on this fire truck when I first started in the fire service. It was taken out of service and sold to a private party. I found it minus the motor and trans 2 years ago. Have been trying to get it back into running shape ever since.

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I would put a chevy v8 in it and a GM transmission. It would be cheaper and easier to get parts for. I would not be inclined to put a diesel in it, but you were the 237 is a good choice. Good luck. Mike

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Also, staying with a gas engine the gear ratio in the rear axle could probably remain depending on what it is and how you intend to use the truck.

If you put a diesel where a gas motor had been and leave the rear axle alone, the truck will be way too slow due to the different rpm operating ranges.

Certainly a nice truck to save!

Jim

It doesn't cost anything to pay attention.

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Also, staying with a gas engine the gear ratio in the rear axle could probably remain depending on what it is and how you intend to use the truck.

If you put a diesel where a gas motor had been and leave the rear axle alone, the truck will be way too slow due to the different rpm operating ranges.

Certainly a nice truck to save!

If you use a Detroit 6-V53 Diesel you can keep the the rear, I think they turn over 3200 RPM's and are compact enough to shoe horn into many diff. trucks I have seen many Diamond Reo Gold Comet gas conversons in the past using this motor and they worked well

BULLHUSK

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Ok I have a 1957 B-95 with a 707 in it. the truck has been parked since 2002 when the gas prices went through the roof. The last show I went to was Litiz when Harvy had the Mack 100th year show on Saturday for Fire trucks[ all Mack fire trucks only]and the normal show on sunday. I drove it round trip a little over 500 miles from the Catkills N.Y and it cost me $900.00 in gas. Today it will be around $3,000.00 in gas .I say this because you have to know how you are going to use your prize . I have a 671 Detroit[yes F.W.D.] ready to go in it so I can show the truck again. It will not be original but what good is it sitting in my barn not going any where because of cost. A buddy of mine has a 1950 Ward Lafrance that had a blown motor and went with a 466 International diesel which is very common and easy to find. He has the cost of diesel and the availabilty of a common engine. I may go that way but thought about buying a school bus used late model and taking the whole drive train out GM or International junk the bus or use it as a work shop this way you have a modern matching drive line with highway speeds. PS your engine was taken out because it is well sought after 413 wedge and a cheap way to get one !

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his engine WAS a Hemi, Not the 413. his was a 354.but was probably still sold off cause it was highly sought after. and im thinkin when i saw his truck about a year ago on the military site for sale it still had the engine and the guy wrote he would not sell just the engine, guess someone gave him a good offer. i have a brand new 413 sittin on a stand in my garage with a 100 miles on it, noone seems to be bustin down my doors for it and id get rid of it complete carb to muffler for less than a grand. also a 237 would be way too heavy for a B475 unless you changed the springs and front axle and you still have to address the fact that is has juice brakes. i am thinkin maybe even a 8.2 liter driptroit would slide right in that firetrucka dn you could keep the original rear. have read good and bad on the 8.2 and they were found in a lot of trucks GM and Fords even busses thru the 90's

post-6-0-64947600-1408238925_thumb.jpg

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"Ok I have a 1957 B-95 with a 707 in it. the truck has been parked since 2002 when the gas prices went through the roof. The last show I went to was Litiz when Harvy had the Mack 100th year show on Saturday for Fire trucks[ all Mack fire trucks only]and the normal show on sunday. I drove it round trip a little over 500 miles from the Catkills N.Y and it cost me $900.00 in gas. Today it will be around $3,000.00 in gas ."

Not to hijack the thread, but you have really hit on the crux of why collecting and showing fire trucks appeals to so few folks. Unless you can afford to have a highway truck with a lowboy to transport them most full size fire trucks are just too slow and fuel hungry to take anywhere.

I'd love to have an AC or some other classic like a 400 series LaFrance, but if I bought one all I could afford to do is keep it in the garage and tell folks I own it unless the show was within a few miles of the house.

I'm a bit of a purist, but re-powering a common rig like a B model makes sense to me if it means it will be shown for all of us to enjoy.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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Nice going Carl. Now I am going to continue the hijacking. I am lucking to have a lot of great shows in my area. I am also lucky that my father has a tractor trailer that he can haul my junk on. But I am also happy just to have the stuff sitting in my garage. I do not need to show them. I get just as much enjoyment from walking around the garage as I do driving down the road and it doesn't cost me anything except the electric to turn on the lights.

As for the hemi powered B model, I had not thought of the 237 being so much heavier than the hemi. I would still go with a Chevy V8. There was a local Dodge dealership that shut down a bunch of years ago. Their 2 mid-sixties dodge tow trucks sat around until 3 or 4 years ago when someone bought them, cut the hemis out and sent the rest for scrap.

Mike

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Holly cow. My post generated allot of discussion. To the purists out there I agree with you all. I would love to have the original motor and trans. They went away between the time it was taken oos and the time I acquired it. My plan when I got it was to donate it back to the fire department. At the time nobody was interested in it. I did put it up for sale. No takers. Now some of the guys are getting interested in it so hopefully it will have a permanent home back in the fire house.

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I do not need to show them. I get just as much enjoyment from walking around the garage as I do driving down the road

And I agree, a big part of my mental well being is just working on the trucks or even sitting in them while the world passes by. But we are really just care takers for the next generation and letting everyone else have the pleasure of seeing them is part of that responsibility. Kind of like putting the Mona Lisa in a private collection; great for the owner's ego, but none of us could get to enjoy it.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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agree myself. got my 354 Hemi runnin over the winter in my B475 and I can tell you a few trips around the yard sucks a 5 gallon can of gas dry. I still think if you found an old school bus with an 8.2 liter Detroit in it it would be a good engine for that. it would fit right in, they are fuel sippers, most had juice brakes and you could probably find one with a 5 speed and use the transmission and rear end.

post-6-0-64947600-1408238925_thumb.jpg

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And I agree, a big part of my mental well being is just working on the trucks or even sitting in them while the world passes by. But we are really just care takers for the next generation and letting everyone else have the pleasure of seeing them is part of that responsibility. Kind of like putting the Mona Lisa in a private collection; great for the owner's ego, but none of us could get to enjoy it.

Thanks to all you guys who maintain old Mack trucks for our enjoyment. I would love to have an old Mack fire engine but I have three strikes against me:

1. I'm a retired firefighter - No money (but lots of "L" and "B" memories)

2. No place to park one. No way I would buy one to leave it outdoors in New England

3. I'm not a mechanic, I think that you have to be able to do maintenance on them. I read a lot of these threads and I'm amazed (and jealous) at what you guys know and can do to your trucks.

I'll continue to live vicariously through you guys.

bulldogboy

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Thanks to all you guys who maintain old Mack trucks for our enjoyment. I would love to have an old Mack fire engine

Find out if there is a local SPAAMFAA chapter near you. Most of our club members have more than one rig and they are always on the look out for someone who would drive a rig to a parade or show for them. Join the chapter and see what happens.

We even have members who store rigs for other members who don't have room for a truck.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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as fxfymn said join a club , if you had L' and B' knowledge you are valuable , if you just like them that's great too. we are having the national muster at cooper river park in Pennsauken ,n.j. on aug 3 ,2013 ,will have many trucks their( I'll have my totally restored LS85 their).

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Those are some great points all of you hit on......I agree with Yarnall.....first and foremost is the enjoyment of owning And working on an antique truck. As far as showing trucks......I wondered how guys moved their trucks around? Seems it would add up quick no matter which way you went. As for me I'm content seeing the nose of the L model peeking out of the barn.....and the smiles the kids have climbing all over it.....

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Achiefire,

Have you thought that maybe the person that owned the vehicle before you, might be wanting to sell the engine and transmission that it had in it? Anything is possible in this world. Maybe just a little research could make it possible. If not, then this BMT site has some of the best people around. They can sure give you help and ideas as to your restoration. The main thing to do is, sit down and make a list of your needs and make sure that you know what you want to do with this fire truck. Charlie Hatfield is another person that can be of help with your concerns. Charlie is from Louisville, Ky. And has many years of fire truck experience. Best regards in your decision.

mike

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