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other dog
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42 minutes ago, mrsmackpaul said:

Looks like a allcrop header to me, Allis chalmers were probably the biggest manufacturer of them but I think everyone had a go at building something along those lines 

 

Paul

When I was just a kid, many years ago, our neighbor had an International model 76 combine and a Farmall 300 tractor, which me and my brothers thought must be the biggest tractor in the world because my daddy and grandfather had 2 Farmall C tractors. He used to combine our wheat, and most everybody else's in the area, because most of the farmers around would sow a few acres of wheat, or barley, or oats, so it wouldn't be cost effective to buy a combine to thresh 2 acres of wheat every year. So our neighbor would combine it for them, when he could get to it, because he had the only combine around.

He had the kind you had to ride on and fill the bags and tie them, then dump them off the platform so they could be loaded onto a truck, or trailer, or wagon.  Somebody had to ride that combine behind that tractor all day, in the dust and heat. We used to like to get to ride it- all we did was hand the man that knew what he was doing the bags, or a piece of twine that we pre-cut to tie the bags with, and we thought it was fun, because we were kids. His looked like this, but I couldn't find any pictures of the one that had the platform that you had to ride, all the pictures showed a bin.

combine768.jpg.daf1405d88e8161f1fe125a385285a3e.jpg

Then after my Daddy bought a 5000 Ford tractor, he bought a combine too. You didn't have to ride it because it had a bin that held 26 bushels, but where the other combine never stopped, we had to stop when the bin was full and fill bags one at a time, because everybody still wanted their wheat in sacks. This combine didn't have the canvas belt to bring the wheat up, it had an auger. But the best thing was the hydraulic grain head. You had to turn a crank on that 76 to raise or lower the grain head, but the 80 had a cylinder underneath to raise and lower it by moving a lever on the tractor. It was the cat's ass when you got into wheat that had blown down. I combined a lot of grain with that unit. It looked like this-

comttsnewdonotcopypicatallfromtts11.jpg.3d36cfddb147c95c13d1349d4602bf98.jpg

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Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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I remember the pull type bagger combines also.

In 1957 one of our neighbors was in the Agri-trucking business and bought a Massey Harris self propelled combine with about a 10-12 foot header and corn picker/sheller to go with his 1956-57 Chevy 10500 with a 16 foot grain body and overhead over the cab for hay. 

In the spring he hauled lime and fertilizer, then grain all over, hay to the horse race tracks, and coal out of the Scranton PA area back to our houses.

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Brocky

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7 hours ago, other dog said:

When I was just a kid, many years ago, our neighbor had an International model 76 combine and a Farmall 300 tractor, which me and my brothers thought must be the biggest tractor in the world because my daddy and grandfather had 2 Farmall C tractors. He used to combine our wheat, and most everybody else's in the area, because most of the farmers around would sow a few acres of wheat, or barley, or oats, so it wouldn't be cost effective to buy a combine to thresh 2 acres of wheat every year. So our neighbor would combine it for them, when he could get to it, because he had the only combine around.

He had the kind you had to ride on and fill the bags and tie them, then dump them off the platform so they could be loaded onto a truck, or trailer, or wagon.  Somebody had to ride that combine behind that tractor all day, in the dust and heat. We used to like to get to ride it- all we did was hand the man that knew what he was doing the bags, or a piece of twine that we pre-cut to tie the bags with, and we thought it was fun, because we were kids. His looked like this, but I couldn't find any pictures of the one that had the platform that you had to ride, all the pictures showed a bin.

combine768.jpg.daf1405d88e8161f1fe125a385285a3e.jpg

Then after my Daddy bought a 5000 Ford tractor, he bought a combine too. You didn't have to ride it because it had a bin that held 26 bushels, but where the other combine never stopped, we had to stop when the bin was full and fill bags one at a time, because everybody still wanted their wheat in sacks. This combine didn't have the canvas belt to bring the wheat up, it had an auger. But the best thing was the hydraulic grain head. You had to turn a crank on that 76 to raise or lower the grain head, but the 80 had a cylinder underneath to raise and lower it by moving a lever on the tractor. It was the cat's ass when you got into wheat that had blown down. I combined a lot of grain with that unit. It looked like this-

comttsnewdonotcopypicatallfromtts11.jpg.3d36cfddb147c95c13d1349d4602bf98.jpg

I spent quite a few hours on the side of one of those baggers in my younger days . probably ate a couple hundred pounds of of dust and bug parts

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16 hours ago, tjc transport said:

we had a john deere 55 hydro gas.

not bad to run, but constantly overheated cause the radiator would always plug up. 

This one has an engine on it, but I've never seen one working that had it's own engine, they all worked off the tractor's PTO. I don't know what they're going to do with this one, I just saw it and stopped to take pictures, but it does look restorable.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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Is it a combine or a header ?

We call them headers in Australia and a combine I believe is what you lot call a drill

Last years debacle ended up with some quality gear out and about 

 

A Massey Ferguson 587 pto on the back of the Fordson Super Major 

What a mess lol20201115_154019.jpg

20201231-184817.jpg

And six weeks later on new years eve we were done 

 

Paul

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4 hours ago, mrsmackpaul said:

Is it a combine or a header ?

We call them headers in Australia and a combine I believe is what you lot call a drill

Last years debacle ended up with some quality gear out and about 

 

A Massey Ferguson 587 pto on the back of the Fordson Super Major 

What a mess lol20201115_154019.jpg

20201231-184817.jpg

And six weeks later on new years eve we were done 

 

Paul

What I call a drill is used to sow the grain and a combine harvests the grain.

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Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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Paul, Yes it is one of the MANY variations of the mother English language!!! Up here a Combine is so named because it combined the processes of the reaper which cut and bundled the grain with the stationary grain threshing machine.

If you call your grain planting machine a combine, it is maybe because it both plants the seed and fertilizes it at the same time? We call it a drill as it has discs and tubes to place the seed properly in the ground.. Up here we can also plant grass seed at the same time if using the grain crop as a cover crop.

Many More: Bonnet=hood, Boot=trunk, guard=fender, Paddock= lot or pasture, shed= barn or garage,  Pommy=English!!! Yank=American

I could go on and on!! Our trip Down Under in 2015 was very educational!!!

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Brocky

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A header is called a header in Australia because up until say 30 years ago we only harvested the head

received-1477100142722881.jpg

received-216445173764477.jpg

And the seed drill is called a combine because it combines three jobs 

Cultivate 

Seed 

Fertilize

 

Even in Australia a we call things vastly different names from end of the country to the other

A landing net that is used for fishing is called a didel (pronounced die dill, I  have no idea how it is spelt) in the area I farmed in north Queensland 

 

Yeah I have no idea about that one either 

Who knows probably Italian or from that part of the world as there is a lot of Italian descendents on the sugar cane 

 

Paul

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We used to keep the grain head kind of high when we were combining if we didn't want the straw, you could cover more ground quicker that way. I think our combine had a 7 foot head, and we never finished- when one field was done you moved on to the next one. But if we were going to bale the straw, then we would cut it as low as possible to get more straw. Another reason that hydraulic head was the cat's ass.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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  • 2 weeks later...

That second girl at the hardware store likely stayed outside because her friend warned her of the malfunctioning air conditioning.  It looks like maybe it's stuck on high in the store ???  Touching photo seeing such a devoted friend.

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definately like the chicks man,,but getting back to equipment,kind of sad to see very usefull machines just abanded...out here we have millians of dollars of mining equipment sitting in abanded dried up silver and gold mines.....just looks depressing....i guess the price to move these things outweighs just buying new stuff...bob

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