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kscarbel2

Mack – Scania Cooperation

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great history of the mack v8 . i have a few queations though mostly about the reliablility of the older 864/5/6 mack v8s. ive always been told they were not very reliable . ive heard stories of guys changing head gaskets every few months . one guy told me he got so good at changing head gaskets he could do one in about 4 hrs . is there any truth to that ? i know the e9 was pretty much bullet proof unless you abused them .

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I have 4 B755's and out west they were quite popular however 3 of the 4 now have in line cummins in them as that was the engine of choice for loggers after the V8's gave up. I have heard stories of those that loved them and those that hated them. The late Bob Brown told a story when he was the service manager for Mack in the NW a fleet of 864's were sold to a company in Alaska and he said it was a disaster as he considered it to be an experimental engine especially when turbo'd. His opinion was this experience hurt Mack sales in Alaska ever since.

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thamks mackdaddy for the input. i know the guys ive talked to say they had alot of power but didnt hold together. im sure the e9 lost sales because of the early ones. i know my dad wanted to buy a 450 or 500 e9 when he bought his first superliner but was told theu were junk by alot of mack guys so he bought the 350 but latr learned the e9 was a vert dependable motor and ended up putting ane9 in the superliner when the e6 was worn out . i know where one old r700 sets now with a 375 hp v8 . its pretty rough . id like to save it .

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I was under the impression that all Mack V-8's were of the wet liner design.

First the 864, then the 865/866 series, and finally the E-9 series.

Am I wrong?

Ron


"Mack used a dry sleeve liner design while Scania chose wet sleeves."

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I was under the impression that all Mack V-8's were of the wet liner design.

First the 864, then the 865/866 series, and finally the E-9 series.

Am I wrong?

Ron

Mack used a dry sleeve liner design while Scania chose wet sleeves.

You are right of course (too much jet lag this month). From the 864 to the E9, the Mack V8s had wet sleeves just as their Scania relatives always have (right up to the present).

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The 864 and 865 used wet liners.I have been in them when they were around.

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That is one cool website!

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I cant get enough of playing that V8 video!

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Wow! What an education!! Thanks for that info.

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Great info once again.....I think we should sticky some of these threads on these important topics.....

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When Scania introduced the 140 series in 1969 with the 350hp V8 DS14 it became the most powerful highway truck available in Europe... it had an achilles heel that let it down, the G672 trans from the 110 was not up to par until replaced by the GR860 in 1971.

10,000 LB140's were produced from 1969-76, a high number for a premium truck in those days, when it was replaced by the 141 series as competition from Volvo, Mercedes and Fiat were encroaching on the 350hp market.. the DS14.01 in the 141 series incorporated redesigned cylinder heads, camshaft and fuel system to encourage another 25bhp out of it and a torque increase of 21% to 1100ft/lb..

The V8 Scania 141 was the "king of the road" in my days in the UK/Euro trucking industry..

BC Mack

post-10384-0-01831100-1394483192_thumb.j

post-10384-0-96571600-1394483218.jpg

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I wonder why scania went with single heads vs the dual like on the Mack's,....was one considered better than the other?

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That's what I figured with maintance issues...if you have a bad piston or rocker much more easy to pull down one hole than 2

I think some locomotive diesels have individual heads as well for ease of maintance

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KS

Does the Scania V8 have an Engine brake function (Dynatard) they don't mention it!

That in my opinion was one of the down falls of the v 8 lack of engine braking!

Edited by fjh

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