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Not for the faint of heart.....


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....but I just finished converting the FA505 steer axle on my B-61 from Dayton to Hub pilot budds. It is unfortunate that I had to hire out a couple operations that made the project rather costly but often you just have to "buck up" to get what you want. It would have been quite cost effective had I had a lathe big enough to handle the hubs and drums.....but I don't. Oh well, it's done so now I will not have mismatched wheels front and back. On to the next "Challenge" to the pocket book. 

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I would like to see some pics I have a b42 that has dayton in the front and hub pilot in the rear and want to go full hub pilot what all needed machined ?

If your going to be a bear be a grizzly

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3 hours ago, mowerman said:

Doesn’t matter you got what you wanted sometimes that’s the way it is$$$$ bob

Aint that the truth, I jave always felt I'm better to wait and save for longer than get something I dont want and regret it for ever

 

Paul 

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BTW, I forgot to mention, there was what appeared to be a grease shield that was bolted to the backing plate that the original hubs went into. I suspect that it was there so any gease that escaped from the seal would not get on the shoes (at least I think of any other reason for it). I had to eliminate that as the new hub was too big to fit inside it. I contemplated making a new one that would clear the larger hub but decided it wasn't worth the effort.  

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Great job.  I never even contemplated doing the machine work to get hubs on like that.  I have access to all the equipment to do it.

 

It basically is just making the old bearing spacing fit the newer hubs.

 

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IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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I still have all the budd hubs for my rear axle.  Guess maybe I need to start poking around for front hubs that I can convert my 517 axle?

IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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19 hours ago, Brocky said:

Larry, LEAVE THE SPOKES!!!!!!!!!!!

Now that I got them painted up better, I'll likely leave them.  Though shiny aluminum is nice to look at too.

IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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On 1/27/2022 at 7:35 PM, Licensed to kill said:

I searched but was unable to find a drum that was the correct depth. I needed 10" and the closest I could find was 9.75. They would have probably worked but the inner edge of the drum would have been right at the inner edge of the shoe. I didn't like that so I bought the common 10.5 deep drums and had them machined down 1/2" for a perfect fit ($300 + the cost of the drum). 

 

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For $300 I think you could cut the edge of the drum by an angle grinder. Half an hour or so to cut and 20 minutes to even up the edge.

Being where I am I sure would bring drums to a machine shop. But I doubt it would cost more than US $30 for each drum to cut.

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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On 1/27/2022 at 8:23 PM, Licensed to kill said:

BTW, I forgot to mention, there was what appeared to be a grease shield that was bolted to the backing plate that the original hubs went into. I suspect that it was there so any gease that escaped from the seal would not get on the shoes (at least I think of any other reason for it). I had to eliminate that as the new hub was too big to fit inside it. I contemplated making a new one that would clear the larger hub but decided it wasn't worth the effort.  

My understanding is those shields were important when seals were not efficient enough. My 1945 Mack truck had hub seals made of leather. Modern stuff wouldn't allow any greas to go out if all was centered well during machining so my guess you will be Ok with what you've done.

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Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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11 minutes ago, Vladislav said:

For $300 I think you could cut the edge of the drum by an angle grinder. Half an hour or so to cut and 20 minutes to even up the edge.

Being where I am I sure would bring drums to a machine shop. But I doubt it would cost more than US $30 for each drum to cut.

Problem with the angle grinder idea is that it had to be stepped down to go into the back plate so there is 1/2" on the very end that is about 17.5" OD going g into the back plate then it steps up to the big OD of about 18.5" or so. The reason that it took so long is that, being such a large diameter AND having to hold from the inside with the chuck jaws, (and perhaps due to the fact that it is cast) it had to be turned very slow or it would chatter. When I took them in, the machinist estimated 45 minutes for the first one and 30 minutes for the second but was concerned about the aforementioned issues. It ended up taking 2 hours and he rushed as quickly as he could. He felt bad and offered to take the difference out of his salary but it is what it is. I don't expect anyone too work for free or at a loss. 

Edited by Licensed to kill
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