Recommended Posts

What are people running for fuel? We have a 1935 Mack Fire Truck (engine is a 36) and just had the fuel tank relined and the carb completely rebuilt with all new components. I need to bring suggestions to our committee to make a decision on fuel for our old girl. Primarily the truck will be used only for community events, local shows and parades. So not a lot of miles. Maybe going out once or twice a month into the fall and then stored for the winter. I have heard a bunch of suggestions from race fuel, to AV fuel, to regular 93 octane. I know a stabilizer is a must, thoughts also on a lead additive? I would love to hear what people are running. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would run non-ethanol fuel. Most of the "real" fuel sold is mid-grade octane, so that should be sufficient. A friend tried running racing fuel in his 29 White, but it caused a severe vapor lock problem.

I assume you put a fuel shut off at the tank. If the truck is going to get minimal use I'd run it dry every time it is parked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, fxfymn said:

I would run non-ethanol fuel. Most of the "real" fuel sold is mid-grade octane, so that should be sufficient. A friend tried running racing fuel in his 29 White, but it caused a severe vapor lock problem.

I assume you put a fuel shut off at the tank. If the truck is going to get minimal use I'd run it dry every time it is parked.

i agree. run non ethanol if you can, and make sure you always run the carb dry after use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a few antique autos and use non ethanol with Marvel Mystery Oil added. The nearest non ethanol gas station to me is about 35 miles but well worth it. Prior to the non ethanol regular I used av gas  but that was very expensive and became hard to get without a tail number.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LFD1935:

That's the early "B" model that used to be Meadowood, NH's muster truck? I read somewhere recently that it was originally from Lunenburg, MA and that LFD reacquired it. If you need advice, two

other MA fire departments that have early "B" models are Barnstable, a 1935 model and Three Rivers (Palmer), a 1933 model. I put a picture of Meadowood's truck on the "New Hampshire Macks" thread.

                                                                         bulldogboy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, bulldogboy said:

LFD1935:

That's the early "B" model that used to be Meadowood, NH's muster truck? I read somewhere recently that it was originally from Lunenburg, MA and that LFD reacquired it. If you need advice, two

other MA fire departments that have early "B" models are Barnstable, a 1935 model and Three Rivers (Palmer), a 1933 model. I put a picture of Meadowood's truck on the "New Hampshire Macks" thread.

                                                                         bulldogboy

Yep. Here is an article that outlines the history.

http://blogs.sentinelandenterprise.com/communityconversations/2015/07/23/saving-a-1935-mack-fire-truck-priceless/

I believe there is a sister truck, one number off down in CT as well. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  I would also use oils for vintage engines with elevated levels of ZDDP/ZDTP, they're offered by many suppliers (I get mine from Napa or the Edlebrock or Risoline additive alone from Advanced Auto). Regardless, if you are purchasing off-the-shelf oil for your classic car, ILSAC multi-viscosity oils rated SM or CJ-4 should have stated zinc and phosphorus additive supplements for use in older engines or an additional separate additive should be purchased and used with the new oil. The new API rating SN becAme available in 2013 even more caution should be taken as the levels will be reduced even further.  The use of zinc and phosphorus additives helps prevent lifter and cam wear on the older engines more so from the late 1950's and older.   Paul

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, LFD1935 said:

I believe there is a sister truck, one number off down in CT as well. 

Weston, CT has a 1934 "B" model, that could be the one.

                    bulldogboy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/11/2017 at 6:42 PM, 1958 F.W.D. said:

It is absolutely CRITICAL to run non-ethanol gasoline in your antique **ESPECIALLY if it sits for long periods of time** 

Corn gas ate a hole in the diaphragm of the mechanical pump on my Waukesha. Cannot find parts anymore. Had to install an electric pump. I am fortunate in that I have a non-ethanol/special fuels station 10 miles from me and I can get 87 Octane non-eth straight out of a pump, right now it is about $2.89 a gallon. I also add StarTron or StaBil to it for extra insurance. In the summer, when I go to a lot of shows, I will add corn gas in small quantities if I cannot get over to the non eth place.

Some people run AvGas or racing fuels, I will not, I am convinced this runs too hot and will burn valves in older stuff. 

Here is a good website to find non-eth fuels: www.pure-gas.org

On a side note: I switched all of my small engines to non-eth 2 years ago. The difference in performance is DAY AND NIGHT. The smaller the engine, the better it runs on non-eth....My string trimmer and hand held blower became BEASTS when I switched. 



 

You are fortunate for sure. Closest non ethanol is about 30 miles away... $9.99 gal. 

Had a good conversation with a gentleman who restores classic vehicles. He suggested, because we will run through a couple tanks in the warmer months to run premium 93 with a lead additive and when it comes time to store her for the winter, drain or run down the fuel to almost nothing and put in 5 gallons of non ethanol, run until you can smell the change to ensure the lines and carb are filled with non ethanol fuel and park it. 

 

 

Edited by LFD1935
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, LFD1935 said:

drain or run down the fuel to almost nothing and put in 5 gallons of non ethanol, run until you can smell the change to ensure the lines and carb are filled with non ethanol fuel and park it. 

Given how far away you are and the cost, I concur. I do run corn gas through the Waukesha in the summer when I am attending shows regularly, but I do add StarTron or StaBil. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

You are fortunate for sure. Closest non ethanol is about 30 miles away... $9.99 gal. 

Keep looking around as it is becoming much more common. Even the local WaWa sells it now at a price point about $1.50 higher than regular unleaded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LFD1935:

Another 1935 Mack "B" model pumper in Connecticut was operated by North End Hose Company #3 in West Haven. According to "firenews.org" it is now privately owned. Surfing the web shows quite a few

of these early "B" models still around.

                                                          bulldogboy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On  side note.......I ran out of ethanol free gas last week (all I will run in my mower/trimmer/blower.) I meant to get over to the Ethanol-free gas having place again but it's 10 miles away and I forgot about it. But HAD to do the grass tonight as the wife is having a pica-nick tomorrow. So I had no choice- ran corn squeezings in the mower and it RAN LIKE SH*T!!!!! I finished the grass and then ran down to the local hardware store and bought a quart of the pre-mix synthetic stuff for the trimmer and blower. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer non-ETOH fuel, but if you mix Star-Brite with the ethanol fuel and it will run like a top. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What kind of money did he charge?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It cost $115. plus shipping $10. media blasted ,all new internals ,2 mounting gaskets.  turnaround was 3 days too,I'm happy

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good price. Thanks, I think I'll send mine in at the end of the show season.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LFD 1935, from all the articles I've read the ethanol gas is harder on carbureted engines! I'd run non eth. And a stabilizer like stabil! I have a Isuzu p.u with a Weber non emissions carb and all the emissions devices removed and I use ethanol gas and Lucas additive,runs perfect for ten yrs haven't had the carb apart!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now