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Brockway "Toughest Truck In The World"


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Here are my dad's from the 60's

Some more of the V12 and then a 318 and then the 290 cummins

Moved some stuff for a friend yesterday U360 powered by a V12 Detroit

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My 57 B-61 had a belt drive Page&Page axle but it was gone when I got the truck. The brackets were still there but everything else was gone.

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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On 1/10/2020 at 9:10 AM, Red Horse said:

Hah-judging by "slicks" this  is now running qtr mile at Epping?😎

Does great in the yard.  Hasn't seen pavement in a couple of days...

Jim

It doesn't cost anything to pay attention.

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I see from a side view that the 1976 blue Brockway with the R model Mack cab and the Australian R model V 8 valueliner, seem very similar because the set back front axle/wheels appear to be about same position on the frame of both trucks.

I can see that the one piece hood and guards of the V8 Valueliner would virtually fit onto the Brockway. Is it therefore possible that Aussie V8 Valueliner was based on the 1976 Brockway? And maybe the flat hood 6 cylinder Valueliner model was based on the Brockway?

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Green 6 cyl Mack Valueliner.jpg

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Could have some cross pollination happening.  Certainly would have been economical to reuse the already engineered trucks specs from Brockway if they would fit the parameters of the Australian market.

Jim

It doesn't cost anything to pay attention.

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Harry,

I believe that Brockway always used their own frames (????) especially as the majority were built for semi off road, severe service, duty.. It has always been claimed that the prototype 1978 Brockway became the American Mack Superliner. So it would not surprise me that Mack of Australia borrowed many of Brockway's developments. Especially for Outback Road Train work.

I also do not believe that the Mack and Brockway design engineering departments worked together much until into the early 70's when Brockway started to use the Sheller Globe built Mack R model cab that Brockway introduced in 1974 or 5.. 

Edited by Brocky

Brocky

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