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1955 International RDFC-405


j hancock
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Was Page and Page suspension popular in N.H. and VT.? I looked at a B and a REO  in the respective states  and both had the same suspension.

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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I drove a 61 KW conventional for a while with Page and Page, seemed to ride better than Reyco or Freightliner 4 leaf with the short equalizers. 

Also seemed to get around on rough ground well too. I think equalizing the rear of the spring packs helped. 

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8 hours ago, 41chevy said:

Was Page and Page suspension popular in N.H. and VT.? I looked at a B and a REO  in the respective states  and both had the same suspension.

In northern NE, more of an oddball than anything, I would say.  Probably trucks with it got saved because it was so different.

Jim

It doesn't cost anything to pay attention.

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11 hours ago, 41chevy said:

Was Page and Page suspension popular in N.H. and VT.? I looked at a B and a REO  in the respective states  and both had the same suspension.

My B has page and page suspension. Was that suspension used more in straight truck applications? Mine was built as a straight truck. 

The problems we face today exist because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by the people who vote for a living.

The government can only "give" someone what they first take from another.

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22 hours ago, HeavyGunner said:

Was that suspension used more in straight truck applications? 

Seen some straight and some tractor.  Possibly more tractors but not enough to say one way or another.

Jim

It doesn't cost anything to pay attention.

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  • 1 year later...
On 8/24/2018 at 8:39 PM, 41chevy said:

Was Page and Page suspension popular in N.H. and VT.? I looked at a B and a REO  in the respective states  and both had the same suspension.

My B75 has Page and Page suspension. No clue about it popularity though. 

The problems we face today exist because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by the people who vote for a living.

The government can only "give" someone what they first take from another.

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page and page was popular in Aust, 1965 Inter R200 with Page and page, lower truck tare weight more pay load for highway work, reduced maintenance so made a lot of sense, really how often is the tandem drive used on highway work where snow and ice not a concern?

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Makes sense Harry. Makes even more sense to me as to why it would’ve been put on my B75. Mine is a light weight model with lots of aluminum parts and it was originally a straight truck. 

The problems we face today exist because the people who work for a living are outnumbered by the people who vote for a living.

The government can only "give" someone what they first take from another.

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A B61 I was looking over at the Rambler Ranch had the Page and Page with one powered axle. Seems that gives you the best of both worlds for OTR. The B also had a belt set up to power the dead axle wheels. Different unit but they wanted 3 times what it was worth.  The owner is a heavy car collector (6 or 700 Ramblers in his collection)  but no knowledge of vintage trucks.

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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Thank you for the reminder of Transpec, yes this company was the Page and page supplier and fitter of the pusher axle. I see on the picture of the P&P, the pusher axle has spyder wheels and the drive wheels are budds!!! Did the P&P have budd wheels? In Australia 50's, 60' and 70's most trucks had spyder wheels so followed that the P&P axle had spyders.

I cannot recall seeing any P&P with budds.

Also in Australia, a single wheel pusher axle was popular, it was fitted in front of the drive axle for prime movers (tractors) to avoid extending the frame, and the P&P axle had brakes fitted. For tray trucks it was popular to fit a single wheel pusher which were mainly fitted behind the drive axle, to allow a longer frame and tray, to gain more loading capacity (1 or 2 pallets) and avoid having to extend the tail shaft. These single wheel pushers had if I recall a front steer axle with non turning wheels and individual springs, I can't recall if they all had brakes on these single wheels.

And this single wheel pusher was most common across Europe and UK, I think that we copied the UK with the single wheel axles. I have seen the UK and European single pushers fitted both in front and behind the drive axle.

Single wheel pushers were also fitted to long distance buses, mostly behind the drive axle. 

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I have been thinking - there would be a lot of benefits to reintroduce a pusher axle for highway trucks, that are not really requiring the 2nd drive axle, and using for example the  Neway air bag suspension, the drive and pusher axles are independent, unlike the Page and Page system.  

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11 minutes ago, harrybarbon said:

I have been thinking - there would be a lot of benefits to reintroduce a pusher axle for highway trucks, that are not really requiring the 2nd drive axle, and using for example the  Neway air bag suspension, the drive and pusher axles are independent, unlike the Page and Page system.  

I've thought that for years Harry. Both pusher and drag axles were very popular for a lot of years in trucks in my area, but faded out when "twin" screw became the normal. Two of my former tandem trucks are going to single drive with a drop axle for this very purpose. Tires are too expensive anymore to not need on the pavement constant for me. I have a drop axle on my water truck and another out back of the shop to use. 

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Seems to me that what is written by manufacturers about efficiency, environment, minimising materials for manufacture and future running and maintenance costs is more talk than really being serious to actually do what they say. The more I think about a single drive axle and a lifting pusher, for highway and normal road trucks, makes simple sense - which unfortunately is so missing at present. Tandem drive is not necessary for all trucks, so why is so much money invested in tandem drives!!! Think of the $'s that would be saved.

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9 minutes ago, harrybarbon said:

Seems to me that what is written by manufacturers about efficiency, environment, minimising materials for manufacture and future running and maintenance costs is more talk than really being serious to actually do what they say. The more I think about a single drive axle and a lifting pusher, for highway and normal road trucks, makes simple sense - which unfortunately is so missing at present. Tandem drive is not necessary for all trucks, so why is so much money invested in tandem drives!!! Think of the $'s that would be saved.

The savings would continue also not pulling the additional weight of the components. Of course that weight loss could easily convert to additional payload if running full truck loads. The savings are greater when running less that full load or short runs too.

I've said time and time again the manufactures need to look to the past to build for the future.

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, harrybarbon said:

Seems to me that what is written by manufacturers about efficiency, environment, minimising materials for manufacture and future running and maintenance costs is more talk than really being serious to actually do what they say. The more I think about a single drive axle and a lifting pusher, for highway and normal road trucks, makes simple sense - which unfortunately is so missing at present. Tandem drive is not necessary for all trucks, so why is so much money invested in tandem drives!!! Think of the $'s that would be saved.

I work for a world wide company that has both single and tandem drive tractors. When l was told there would be a new tractor being added. They asked what l thought could be spec'd to cut operating costs. The first thing l mentioned was a lift push axle. My thoughts were 60% of the time we don't need a tandem. Your not using two sets of brakes, running four tires, turning a rearend, not paying a toll for that axle when lifted, and an improvement in fuel mileage. Being the penny pinching company they are this went on for six months asking different questions about what to order. ln the end a used Penske rental tandem rolled into the yard. Go figure! 

There is a local milk distributor that has a lift axel on there air ride refer trailers. The axle lifts automatically per how much weight is on the tandems.    .....Hippy     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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