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Flywheel housing alignment


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I am swapping a different flywheel housing onto my '58 673 because it had the shallow housing before and the duplex that mates to it has some issues. The housing is about .032" off center so I need to ream for larger dowels (the existing dowels are 5/8"). Does anyone know if I have to go to 3/4" dowels, or can I get something like .650"? I haven't been able to find anything but 3/4".

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3 hours ago, h67st said:

I am swapping a different flywheel housing onto my '58 673 because it had the shallow housing before and the duplex that mates to it has some issues. The housing is about .032" off center so I need to ream for larger dowels (the existing dowels are 5/8"). Does anyone know if I have to go to 3/4" dowels, or can I get something like .650"? I haven't been able to find anything but 3/4".

Know of anybody with a lathe to turn down from a bigger pin?     terry:MackLogo:

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On 7/27/2018 at 3:49 PM, 12V71 said:

I have a machinist buddy that will make any size dowel from 4140 shaft stock. He has also done a few custom reaming jobs for me on site. 

Have you done the dowel holes on a flywheel housing before? Can I just use a reamer with a jig to hold it square?

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On 7/24/2018 at 2:46 PM, h67st said:

I am swapping a different flywheel housing onto my '58 673 because it had the shallow housing before and the duplex that mates to it has some issues. The housing is about .032" off center so I need to ream for larger dowels (the existing dowels are 5/8"). Does anyone know if I have to go to 3/4" dowels, or can I get something like .650"? I haven't been able to find anything but 3/4".

metric 17mm equals .669. Many foreign trucks use them.

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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1 hour ago, h67st said:

Any idea which manufacturers use them?

I'll get the info for you over the next day or so. I'll start with my parts guru at the Mack, Hino Volvo dealer.    Paul

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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On ‎7‎/‎28‎/‎2018 at 6:50 PM, h67st said:

Have you done the dowel holes on a flywheel housing before? Can I just use a reamer with a jig to hold it square?

He has a jig for his reamer that bolts onto the housing. I let him make his own dowels and do the reaming to match. He has done 3 Cummins engines for me over the years. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Those bell housing bolts drilled for safety wire?

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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13 hours ago, 41chevy said:

Those bell housing bolts drilled for safety wire?

Trying to remember if my 673 had wire on the bolts?   I know they used castle nuts.

 

Just as reference, a Rolls Royce 6 cyl motor had castle nuts on the rods.  Pretty sure they used cotter pins.   Glad that motor didn't see many RPM.  This was a '55 Silver Cloud,  picked it up in Florida back in very early 90's.  Friend bought it, fixed the hole in the block and got it running.  I inherited it when he passed in late 90's.

 

rolls3.jpg

Edited by Freightrain
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IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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5 hours ago, Freightrain said:

Trying to remember if my 673 had wire on the bolts?   I know they used castle nuts.

 

Just as reference, a Rolls Royce 6 cyl motor had castle nuts on the rods.  Pretty sure they used cotter pins.   Glad that motor didn't see many RPM.  This was a '55 Silver Cloud,  picked it up in Florida back in very early 90's.  Friend bought it, fixed the hole in the block and got it running.  I inherited it when he passed in late 90's.

 

rolls3.jpg

 V=8 was  331 Caddie based  In line is / was GMC 261 , later kicked up to 280 ci except cross flow head was GMC bottom end machined and assembled by R.R.  All their 6, 8, class C diesels and V12s used Castile nuts . Their 4 speed auto was  a 1950 51 GM Hydramatic pre park unit.  The head on my 320 GMC in my 55chevy is a 1958 Bentley 6 cylinder cross flow head as good or better than the Wayne head. When I was still in high school I apprenticed at Raycor Rolls Royce, BMW, Rover. got to learn all the RR secrets of the time.

Edited by 41chevy
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"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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Neat Paul.

Friend bought this car, with blown motor.  Seems motor was "Fresh", but if I recall a pin froze and the piston punched a hole in the block.  Friend sleeved it(he had all the old school equipment at home), patched the side of the block and got it all running again.  I won't say it was a great engine, but it ran.  He drove it just a little, then realized there was no lube in the rearend and it starting howling, bad.  Knowing what it would cost, I found a 9" ford housing from a buddies Torino that bolted in.  Just had to change rims to match bolt pattern.  The braking system on those cars are RIDICULOUS and this one was in very poor shape.  I never did get the brakes working well enough to actually drive it again.  Friend got ill and passed quickly.  He had changed his will to give the car to me.  It was too much of a project for me at the time and no place to work on it.  I sold it.  I wanted to keep the manual, but gave it to the new owner.  It was actually written speaking to "The driver", not the owner of the car.  It had more linkages and lube lines then you can even imagine and so much of it was in bad shape.  But it was RH drive and maybe today I would have taken it on and got it running better.

 

Now back to our regularly scheduled program....... ;)

Edited by Freightrain
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IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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The Bango rear was all 1938 and up Ford 1 ton mechanisticals, Bango was cast aluminum.  Yeah brakes took a bit to understand. First thing we learned was if you back up, stopped and went forward  you had zero brakes until the servo's rotated back to the forward mode. Learning that usually was accompanied by white knuckles and a loud Aw F$%K.

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"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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