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1984 MC686F


MissouriDreaming
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Looks great.

Do you have any fire flea markets in the area? If so, you will probably find the valve handles, etc. there.

The gaskets can be found at any truck body parts supplier. Here is one link: http://www.mooreindhardware.com/index.html and another http://www.austinhardware.com/index.cfm

Mack pump gauges show up on eBay all the time.

Good luck and have fun.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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If you have not done so, contact the Mack Museum with the serial number and they will provide everything about the truck. Sending a donation is greatly appreciated and keeps them going. As was said most of what you need can be found at musters and online.

Great looking truck - have fun with it.

Mark

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I have a question on storage of an old truck. I know I must keep it out of the rain but how important is climate control? Right now I plan on storing this behind my shop under an RV cover, at least from April-Oct, and then indoors if I can find a place suitable.

If climate control is not a huge issue then I might just build a truckport behind the shop and park it under that. Anyone have any experience?

Gregg

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I don't mean to be harsh, but the bottom line is you cannot find indoor storage for the truck please consider selling it before it deteriorates to the point that only a scrap dealer wants it. Fire trucks live their entire lives indoors and quickly deteriorate if they are left outdoors. The bright work fails, paint fades, etc. and before long the owner loses interest in his/her pet because it looks like crap.

Climate control is not at all important as long as you drain the pump and tank and keep the proper mix of anti-freeze in the coolant system. It is important to get it indoors, not just under a carport type structure. I'm having fits re-doing my 25 AB because a former owner put it under a carport and it rusted badly on one side where the carport failed to keep the weather off of it.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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Well, that settles that. Indoors it goes. Sounds like I just need to build it a garage but until then I will put it in indoor storage and forget the cover/truckport idea.

This truck has been on my mind and in my dreams since I was a child. I will not allow it to further rust, deteriorate or otherwise turn to crap and to do so I have a lot to learn. Today it got an inspection, brakes adjusted, coolant system checked ect, ect. Only issues found was a rusted exhaust clamp needed replaced and the new brakes were way out of adjustment. Hopefully it stops better now.

Thanks for the info!

Gregg

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Well, that settles that. Indoors it goes.

That's great news! Whenever fire truck collectors get together you can count on them talking about two things: their trucks and the buildings they put them in.

If you have the room to build on you can put up a pole building that is plenty large enough to hold the truck (and the next one you buy) for less than $10K. Having a concrete floor is nice, but not necessary to keep the truck up and it will lower the cost of the building quite a bit to stay with a gravel floor.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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we where lucky we had put up a 42 x52 pole bldg. 3yrs. before we got our 54 Mack to house landscape equip., started to get too small so last year we put up another

42 x 60 and connected together with a hallway ,this one will be insulated and finished off on the interior ,to keep the dust off the truck

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I think I already have the answer from another thread but just to confirm. Raising the cab only requires the pumping of the jack with the valve switch in the "raise" position. To lower the cab one will just move the valve switch to lower and then pump the jack to lower the cab back down. It appears there is no interlock or latch that keeps the cab down. While the cab is in the raised position there should be a safety bar or latch to help support the cab while raised up so it does not come down unexpectedly. Does this sound correct?

I just noticed wires hanging down to the ground from under the dash area of the cab. No doubt when the mechanic raised the cab for the inspection he went too far and ripped out some wires!!!! I need to get back under it to trace and repair.

Gregg

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Raise is correct. The cab should return under its own weight when you move the lever to LOWER. The only time you need to pump to lower is if you go "over center" (cab will be almost flat on its windshield). If it is like my MH, the interlock is automatic. There should be a safety bar (mine is on same side as the pump). NEVER work under the cab without the safety bar in place. As a secondary precaution, use a 4x4 from the cab to the floor. Again, this is on my MH. The MC may be different.

Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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Don't forget to remove any and all loose tools, lunch box , radio, because it is going threw the windshield, been there done that !

Second that! I once put an SCBA through the windshield of a C model Ford when I forgot to remove it before tilting the cab for the morning check :pat: Fortunately the windshield just popped out of the rubber molding and we were able to put it back. No harm, no foul.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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Yep, I had a horse shoe up my ass that day. Like most places things have changed over the years. In those days if you broke it you fixed it if it all possible. Even if we had broken the windshield I'm sure we would have tried to get it fixed, at my expense, before we reported it as an accident.

I was on a call where a driver bent the back step up almost to the body by gong up a driveway that the angle of departure didn't allow. We traded a member to another company so they could send us a welder who had it fixed that night. Now that would be a firing offense on both counts.

That was the first rig I drove regularly after getting on the job and it did some bizarre things to me. I was returning from the shop when the dual's passed me by just before it took a profound dip to the left. (We started putting yellow stripes on all lug nuts after that to make sure they were noticed if they came loose) I also had the cab come up on me when I stopped at an intersection while on the way to the shops. Yes, I know there is a positive safety latch, but it didn't stop it from coming forward. before it fell back into place.

67 Ford C-800, 534 V8, 2 speed rear, by Young with an extended cab.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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  • 4 weeks later...

A little update on the truck. I have found a place to store it indoors. Not exactly what I want but it will keep it dry and out of the weather until something better comes along. I really need it at a shop or big garage so I can work on it. Kind of a pain to have to get it out of storage and then take it somewhere else to work on it and so on. I have had it out on the road a couple of times so I am getting more comfortable driving it. Still only take it out on late evenings when there is not many people on the road. Other than getting used to the shifting of the auto at low speeds and the effect it has on the truck all seems to be going well. I think its first event will be the local Kansas City SPAAMFAA Chapter Firefest 2015 in Independence, Mo.

Is there anything I should be keeping in mind when driving a heavy truck like this with an automatic? Seems like once it gets into 4th gear it get nice and smooth, fast and can be scary to stop if going down a short hill. If I try to keep the speeds low and not hit 4th gear(35-40MPH) it seems like the RPMs are way high (2100 or so) and I fear bad things will happen. I know experience behind the wheel is really what I need the most, and I am getting it, I just do not want to damage the truck by doing something that I am simply not aware of.

Thanks

Gregg

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Congrats on the storage. Getting it out to work on it will not be as difficult as it would be to try to bring the finish back after it sat outside.

Stand on it and steer was our motto; in other words there is nothing you can do to hurt it. Just make sure the brakes are adjusted properly, keep a reasonable distance between you and the next vehicle, and get out and enjoy it.

Air brakes do take some getting used to. Take it out to a vacant lot and lock it up a few times to get a feel for it.

Money, sex, and fire; everybody thinks everyone else is getting more than they are!

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  • 2 weeks later...

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