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Detroit Diesel 75th Anniversary


farmer52
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From Light and Medium Duty Truck Magazine May 8, 2013

Detroit Diesel Corp. is celebrating its 75th anniversary in 2013, the company announced.

Founded as the General Motors Diesel Division, the company produced its first engine in March 1938. Today, the company, now known simply as Detroit, has a product portfolio that includes engines, transmissions and axles.

Among the company’s product milestones are the Series 60 diesel, which was launched in 1987 and remains in production today. The one-millionth version of the engine was sold in 2009, Detroit said.

“The Series 60 is an important part of our history,” said Brad Williamson, manager, engine and component marketing for Daimler Trucks North America. “It was the first production engine to have integrated electronic controls as a standard feature.”

The company officially changed its name to Detroit Diesel Corporation in 1988 as part of a joint venture between Penske Corporation and General Motors. In 2000, it was acquired by truck and engine maker Daimler AG.

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Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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The oil stain that looks like Jesus has been submitted to the Vatican for consideration of becoming a Miracle- for it came from one of those Anti-Christ and Un-Holy 2-strokes.

Also, note there was prominent mention of the 60-Series (4-Strokes) yet no mention at all of anything 2-stroke. That's corporate's way of finally acknowledging their sin of creating Satan's Engine. They would just rather forget about it. No need to have an exorcist at the end of the 60-Series assembly line.

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TWO STROKES ARE FOR GARDEN TOOLS

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Believe it or not, at one time, there used to be two different valve covers used on these engines.

I think the deal was, but I'm not sure, if the engine was put in a General Motors product the valve covers were stamped "General Motors Diesel".

If it was installed in another application, as in a different truck or marine application the valve covers were stamped "Detroit Diesel"

That's what someone told me at one time.

I do know we had a '65 400 series Brockway with an 8V71 in it that had a "General Motors Diesel" in it.

And all the later '68 400 series Brockways we had had 8V71 "Detroit Diesels" in them!

So I'm not really sure whether that was the case and the '65 had a GM motor that slipped through our it had something to do with year?

Ron

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Believe it or not, at one time, there used to be two different valve covers used on these engines.

I think the deal was, but I'm not sure, if the engine was put in a General Motors product the valve covers were stamped "General Motors Diesel".

If it was installed in another application, as in a different truck or marine application the valve covers were stamped "Detroit Diesel"

That's what someone told me at one time.

I do know we had a '65 400 series Brockway with an 8V71 in it that had a "General Motors Diesel" in it.

And all the later '68 400 series Brockways we had had 8V71 "Detroit Diesels" in them!

So I'm not really sure whether that was the case and the '65 had a GM motor that slipped through our it had something to do with year?

Ron

General Motors did not call them Detroit Diesel until that time. The name change was better for marketing purposes. Other truck companies did not like the idea of having what was then known as a "GMC engine" in their trucks. They were known as a Detroit diesel in the early years, but were not badged that until after International Harvester started calling them that later on (as the story goes).

General Motors bought the Winton company, a two stroke diesel engine manufacturer, in order to make engines for locomotives. Later they developed the engine for trucks.

There needs to be a book written about Detroit Diesel.

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Then and now, The best Diesel engine ever built ! without question. If any one has ever had there power go out in the dead of winter when the temp's went down into the single ## and your trucks were pluged in...... If you didn't have A 2 cycle Detroit in your fleet to tow your Big Bad Cat an Cummins???? The guy down the block with the oil leakers, no power, noise makers...... did your work!!

BULLHUSK

I had em back in hte 71 & 92 days and still run em today... and another word for boat anchor is A-Cert not Detroit

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Thanks alot Roger traitor Penske

How can Detroit Diesel be celebrating its 75th anniversary when it no longer exists. The company was acquired by Daimler Corp. in 2000. The terms "Detroit" and "Detroit Diesel" today are now simply brand names of Daimler Corp. (that's per Daimler).

Following in the footsteps of Mack Trucks, Freightliner, Sterling and Western Star, Detroit Diesel represents yet another global icon from the United States that is now owned by the Europeans, more humiliating proof that America no longer has the ability to compete and lead in our own domestic truck market.

I can't blame Roger if he decided to get out of the engine business, as that's his call (although I wish he hadn't). But I do wish that Detroit Diesel had been acquired by a U.S. truckmaker, and thus remained an American entity. It would have made sense for Navistar to acquire Detroit Diesel rather than build the MAN D20 and D26 engines under license.

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