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58000 lb rear info needed


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I have a 1998 R model with the 58000 lb rears and would like to convert to hub pilot or stud pilot.

I’ve been told they take special rims due to the larger hub/cone assembly 

can someone give me some information about this ?

what would the correct rims be for this and could I run 24.5 tires ?

I’ve hear it’s only for the 11r 24 set up

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I don't know if I've ever seen 58k rears with tubeless rims/tires. Only 11.00-24 and 12.00-24 tube type tires. Its an interesting question if the wheel ends can be converted to 22" hubs to run 24.5 tubeless tires. Someone on here will probably know if its possible to do, however, I would call Barry at Watts Mack and ask the question. If it is possible he will be able to give you all the correct part numbers for the hubs, bearings (if necessary), seals, etc. My buddy did a conversion of 38k Mack spoke hubs to hub pilot and Barry told him everything that was needed and gave him all the part numbers in only a few minutes. Being the truck is a 1998 I don't think finding the information will be much of an issue. 

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Thanks for the update,

it originally came with the 12r24 tube tires with 24” Dayton and was converted to 22” Dayton’s to run 11R24.5

i was thinking about changing it over to run hub/stud pilot but was told it required special rims and even then may be for the 12r24 tube tires.

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Sounds like you would be good to go then. Like I said if its already converted to 22" hubs to run 24.5" tubeless rims then I don't see a problem. There should be a hub pilot hub that crosses to that spoke hub's dimensions I would think. Maybe you would run into weight rating issues. Maybe hub pilot isn't rated for that much weight? Just looking at the two styles its easy to see how spoke hubs can safely bear a lot more weight than hubs supported by wheel studs. I dunno. I would just call the experts and ask the question. Also what is the truck used for? Depending on the application, spokes provide a lot of benefits in my opinion. And being that they are already converted to 24.5" tubeless hubs/wheels I'd say you probably in the best position already.....

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There may be a "European" bolt pattern disk hub that will carry the big bearings. Plenty of disks made for those hubs, but still not what I'd call common. That said, I wouldn't have made the change to begin with.

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This is an expensive change even if the stuff is still available.  If I'm not mistaken it requires a hub change (obviously) along with different drive plates. There used to be a guy here with a Superliner with 58s, he had chrome Daytons on it. I remeber seeing Budds with 58s, not sure I ever saw hub pilots on them.  Budds are kinda going backwards as far as a truck with 58s as they can't take the weight anyway.

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13 minutes ago, Mark T said:

T.  Budds are kinda going backwards as far as a truck with 58s as they can't take the weight anyway.

Kinda begs the question, what is the intended use of the truck? If you plan on using the 58's to their fullest, then stay with 24" TT, if you are not, but are still going to load the truck, I think those 58's would be an albatross in terms of parts when on the road. If it is a "hobby" truck then the 24" tires will out last your lifetime, so again no reason to change.

 Seams like a whole lot of money to spend if you don't need too.

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16 minutes ago, JoeH said:

Being a two man company, I prefer Budds because brakes are much easier to replace by yourself.  But on the roadside, a flat tire is much easier to replace with spoke hubs instead of Budds, if you have someone able to bring you a wheel and a lug wrench.

I have a good heavy duty plug kit and a can of starting fluid,that’s what I love about tubeless tires..🤔🤣

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28 minutes ago, JoeH said:

Being a two man company, I prefer Budds because brakes are much easier to replace by yourself.  But on the roadside, a flat tire is much easier to replace with spoke hubs instead of Budds, if you have someone able to bring you a wheel and a lug wrench.

Those in the picture JoeH posted look like they might be it.  They're inboard brakes. No advantage to them as far as brake work goes. I'm thinking they may be the only way to get disc type wheels on 58s.  I could be wrong though. 

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I know more than a few oldtimer that never pull the wheels for brake jobs, doesn't matter if inboard or outboard, they pull the hub and wheels as one. If you are working on a smooth shop floor, a big piece of tin layed under the tires and slicked up with soap and water, just slide them out. I was always doing it in dirt, so would use my boom truck when I could. Trailer hubs you can't do that, but they make a slider tray for dual, which is slick.

 Quicker to pull the hub and wheels together and allows for bearing inspection also. Only down side is if you find you need a drum, with out board you have to pull them apart, in board it can depend.

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Greased up board or a pallet jack is pretty much the standard deal

Doing it with the wheels on is by far the easiest by a long way

They just slip right on

If you do have to drop the wheels for some reason, a motor bike jack works a treat

1-99f374c51b-slide1_3ab6309f-5ab7-42b6-b076-bf4528c887ed.jpg.d36cf3c7c66be698981a3c5c812990ca.jpg

If your on dirt, chuck a sheet of 5 ply down to wheel a pallet jack on

Even if using a greased board a sheet of ply makes the job a lot more pleasant 

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On 4/7/2024 at 11:03 AM, JoeH said:

https://truckpartsinventory.com/part-details/82219704/used-stud-pilot-budd-rear-wheel-end-spoke-hub-for-sale

 

Pulled this off the googleweb. Haven't been able to find a P/N. Gonna hop on Truck Paper and look up RD/DM SX models and see if anyone has budds. Then you can pull a VIN off the truck,go to Mack and get drive hub part numbers.

Screenshot_20240407-105536.png

I inquired about them and was told even though they are stud pilot they require a special rim and can only run 24” tube tires

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On 4/7/2024 at 4:22 PM, MACKS said:

I can’t say I have ever saw anything but spoke wheels on 58000 rears,I have 58000 on my cl and run 12R24.5 rubber,what’s the reason for trying to swap it out if you don’t mind me asking?

Ease of maintenance mostly 

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On 4/7/2024 at 12:09 PM, Geoff Weeks said:

Kinda begs the question, what is the intended use of the truck? If you plan on using the 58's to their fullest, then stay with 24" TT, if you are not, but are still going to load the truck, I think those 58's would be an albatross in terms of parts when on the road. If it is a "hobby" truck then the 24" tires will out last your lifetime, so again no reason to change.

 Seams like a whole lot of money to spend if you don't need too.

I like the 58’s as they ride much nicer than a 44 plus I get into some severe off road situations and like the idea of having the heavy rears to keep parts from breaking 

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