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67RModel

Porch Pup
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Everything posted by 67RModel

  1. I have noticed over the last year and a half that people spat off what seems to be large numbers and/or statistics but really fail to understand any perspective as to what they are saying. If you use March 1st, 2020 as the "start" of the pandemic, about 592 days have passed since then. Per the US CDC on average 8159 people die every single day from all causes of death. Some real quick 4th grade math will tell you that about 4,830,128 people have died since March 1st 2020. A little 5th or 6th grade math will tell you this 737,589 figure is about 15% of the total deaths since March 1st 2020. Its impossible to know how many of the 737,589 would have passed on during this timeframe had there never been Covid 19 but lets just infer 300,000 (since we know the overwhelming majority of deaths attributed to Covid19 are very elderly and/or already very ill people) so your number number now drops to 437,589 of actual Covid 19 deaths of individuals who would probably still be currently living had there not been Covid 19. The population of the USA is currently about 329,500,000. That same 5th or 6th grade math from before will tell you that 0.2% have died from Covid 19. Less than one quarter of one percent. Nevermind the fact the 737,589 figure is artificially inflated for numerous reasons. Hospitals were/are incentivized with government money to record the cause of death as Covid 19. The network of traveling nurses and healthcare workers setup and subsidized by the government early on were allocated to hospitals with higher Covid death rates. Testing early on was non existent or unreliable. Is Covid 19 real? It absolutely is 100% real, and it is more deadly than the seasonal flu to a very small portion of the population. Nobody is arguing about that at all. Nobody ever was. What people are arguing about is the complete and total unnecessary transformation in the way we conduct our lives. The complete and total disruption to the global economy and supply chain. The amount of debt and spending the government has unnecessarily taken on in the last 592 days (this to me me is the largest travesty of all). And finally, the draconian measures the government has continually rolled out to force its citizens' hands. If you dig further into the numbers and data to fully understand what has actually happened in the last 592 days you will most likely be amazed. The effects of these decisions are far reaching and very long lasting and in the end will most likely have a net negative benefit to the world. Have a nice day.
  2. If it was some type of specialty truck with very unique specs or had a type of body that was "rare" or difficult to replace I would be more inclined to agree it is worth it. It sounds like it is a garden variety triaxle dump truck in which case it can't be economically "worth it" to rerail, overhaul engine, and replace the dump body vs buying a similar, fully depreciated, turnkey unit. If your objective is nostalgia, hobby, or some other reason that is not economics then yes it could be "worth it". If you had other truck(s) to run and eliminate the downtime you would have while rebuilding the truck it could also be worth it in that scenario as well.
  3. Looks like a late 1940s Diamond T to me.
  4. Probably not worth it. You can find those trucks all day long with good frame rails and beds for anywhere from $20k to $35k. Granted they probably wont have the same drivetrain specs as yours, however, you could keep yours as a parts truck. You could buy a turn key truck with similar specs and just start running it. Reframing a truck and having a new/used bed put on it can't cost less than $25k if you are paying a shop to do it plus you will be missing out on several weeks worth of revenue. Additionally you then have to rebuild the engine. I would find a solid used truck that suits your needs and go that route. And have your current engine rebuilt as a spare. And hang onto your current rears and transmission as good parts.
  5. Any manufacturer's truck can be set up to be "the toughest truck on the market". Its all about correct specifications for the task. You could in theory spec a Granite so poorly it would give you as much trouble as the Cascadias you are referring to. In turn, you also can't take 8 Freightliner Cascadias off the interstate, which are set up for maximum fuel economy, throw them into a muddy field and expect them to hold up to that abuse.
  6. Where are you located? I have a parts DM 800 and a parts DM600 for sale: https://www.bigmacktrucks.com/topic/65212-mack-steel-dash-dm600-dm800/
  7. I am running a fully mechanical EM7 in a 1994 RD690 dump truck. It is a bone stock, one owner (before me), all original unit with 335,000 miles and 11,500 hours on the clock. It has some type of miss while under light throttle input from 1100 - 1300 rpm. For instance, if you are slowing down to make a turn, downshift, and your rpms fall within that range and you apply light throttle to maintain that speed/rpm it will make and audible missing sound. If you lift completely out of the throttle and let the trucks momentum carry itself it will go away. If you apply more throttle (say half or more) it will accelerate and go away around 1300 rpm. If the truck is on a downgrade or coasting in that rpm range under its own momentum with no throttle input at all it will not happen. It only happens when the throttle is lightly depressed in that certain rpm range. Any idea what it could be or tips on how to troubleshoot it. It appears the pump has never been apart as it and the timing gear cover still have the security wires and pressed lead fasteners still intact. Its drivable as is but annoying and obviously not right. For reference this is an EM7, 250 horsepower, governed at 1750rpm. Thanks in advance.
  8. I would get the engine serial number and CPL (critical parts list) number and call a Cummins distributor. They probably have one on their shelf. The Cummins distributor by me is Bridgeway Cummins. If you have those two numbers off your engine they can get you anything for it. Very similar to Caterpillar's parts network.
  9. I always thought this was the case. I think the trucks with maxidynes that have the econodyne badge on the hood are governed at 1750 rpm. From the beginning the maxidynes were 2100 rpm engines. Somewhere along the line some of them were governed at 1750rpm to save fuel and reduce driver fatigue by cruising at 1750 instead of 2100. My 1994 RD690 has a fully mechanical EM7-250 under the hood but it is governed at 1750rpm. It has a silver bulldog on the hood and no econodyne badging though.
  10. I have always wondered about this. I feel like if I were to go to Australia I would not be able to drive a manual transmission. It seems so ridiculously nuts to have to shift with my left hand since I am right handed. I don't know if I have that coordination. I guess it would be the same concept for leftys pretty much everywhere else that drive manual transmissions. I guess you just get used to it?
  11. 67RModel

    WTB-B61

    No I jacked the pinion up with a floor jack and just rolled the whole assembly forward by hand. I had to cage the spring chambers to release the emergency brakes but once released the whole axle assembly will roll very easily on a level concrete floor. Yes air lines can easily be shortened. If they are the new style plastic material you can simply cut them, install an new ferrule, and reinstall them into the fitting and tighten. Mine were still the original flared copper tubing. I just ended up replacing mine with all new materials and fittings since the copper was covered in hardened grease and 3 different colors of paint.
  12. 67RModel

    WTB-B61

    Shortening the wheelbase and driveline is a generally fairly simple project. Especially something with leaf spring rear suspension. I shortened my R model from 207" to 165" wheelbase with just basic tools last spring when I was forced to stay home for covid19 lockdown. Took about three days of work to complete but I took my time and was methodical about it. Pretty much all I needed was a 1/2" breaker bar with a 15/16" socket, 15/16" wrench, 1/2" drill, 5/8" drill bit, a tape measure, sledge hammer, and a lot of muscle. The driveshaft can be shortened by a driveline shop fairly easily and quickly once you get the rear axle bolted back in to its new location, and a final measurement. I think the shop charged me somewhere around $150 to shorten and rebalance my driveshaft. I wouldn't hesitate for a minute if all a truck needed was some wheelbase removed to be what you wanted....Attached are some of the pictures of when I shortened mine. Very doable project.
  13. 67RModel

    WTB-B61

    Here is another single axle diesel B model that is not rusty for sale on Ebay. https://www.ebay.com/itm/203543149764?hash=item2f641dfcc4:g:9i8AAOSwWo1hBgw8
  14. Yes. You can buy remanufactured compressors so they can obviously be rebuilt, however I'm not certain if you can buy a parts kit to do it yourself. I'm guessing most likely but someone else on here will know for sure.
  15. Yes the air compressors are pressure lubricated by engine oil. They also generally have a coolant line going to them too for cooling.
  16. 67RModel

    WTB-B61

    Here is another fairly close to me. Near Youngstown, OH. They are literally all over if you look....
  17. 67RModel

    WTB-B61

    4 in Scranton PA.......
  18. 67RModel

    WTB-B61

    I always see at least 2 or 3 for sale on Facebook Marketplace whenever I look. Granted they are not always close to me but they are definitely out there. Look on the ATHS backlot classified listings as well. Always at least one for sale on there as well. Below is a very nice one in Uniontown Ohio.....There are 2 or three very close to me on Marketplace but they are project trucks requiring considerable investment..
  19. Yes. When you pull the pump away that machined/keyed coupler will fall out. Once you see it you will understand. It only goes back together one way. Just don't spin the engine while the pump is off.
  20. That looks like an American Bosch pump. Removal is very strait forward. Disconnect all linkages and lines then just unbolt it from the front cover / timing gears. There should be a support underneath pump that supports the back end of it. The two bolts a real bear to access. In my opinion that is the hardest part of the job...removing and reinstalling these support bolts. Once it is unbolted it just slides out of the timing gears and lifts out. A real back breaker. It is a lot harder when it is the engine is in the truck and you are leaning over a frame rail to get to everything. It can only be installed the correct way or 180 degrees from the correct way so as long as you dont move the truck (or rotate the engine in this case) while the pump is out you will not loose the timing. There is machined metal puck that couples the pump to the timing gears much like the rubber part of a lovejoy coupler. It will fall out when you take remove the pump so be ready to catch it. The gasket to reseal the pump to the engine is still readily available from the Mack parts counter for about $12. I will look in my records to see if I can find a part number.
  21. I don't even know where to start with this one. Running on 11R22.5 rubber with a 2.28 rear end and a T2070 you would be turning 678 rpms at 60mph and 791 rpm at 70 mph in 7th gear😂. A 4700 or 4900 series poop spreader chassis is not designed to fit a 12 or 15 liter engine under the hood so serious modifications would have to be done plus the front suspension would need beefed up....A DT 466 is only 7.6 liter by comparison. Plus I doubt either of the two larger engines' radiators would fit under the hood. I don't know you so I would never pass judgement, but in this case I will say it is just another stupid idea of yours 😅. Just change the rear end gear in the truck you buy.
  22. This truck is on Ebay for sale. Looks like it got damaged in some type of accident.... https://www.ebay.com/itm/194216557302?_trkparms=aid%3D111001%26algo%3DREC.SEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20160908105057%26meid%3D5794447c5c4d480680f156e7047d40cf%26pid%3D100675%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D15%26sd%3D194216557302%26itm%3D194216557302%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2380057&_trksid=p2380057.c100675.m4236&_trkparms=pageci%3Ae1afbddc-d8f5-11eb-9b10-d6abf6455abd|parentrq%3A58922e0717a0a44e6ab6a657ffec1818|iid%3A1
  23. Why do so many LTL freight trucks from the 60s, 70s, and 80s have the front bumper cut off on the ends? You only really see it on the fleet trucks from that time. Was it a weight and/or cost saving measure? It always jumps out at me and I don't know why companies did it.
  24. Yes. And this combination is easily worth $32,000 to somebody who wants a nice B model and realizes its going to take $30k - $40k and a year or two of their lives to build one from a $2500 pile of would be scrap metal they bought off Craigslist or Marketplace....assuming they even had the means to do a restoration. Plus you get a trailer with this one.
  25. Generally how large is the annual White bash? Is there a large turnout?
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