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Yes, you read that right. I'm doing things backwards. The diff I'm getting has hub pilot budds of course but I want to stay with daytons. From what I understand the outside bearings are the same but the inner bearing is smaller on the daytons. I can deal with that but, as i was walking past my B-61 yesterday I noticed that it has 5 or 6 bolt axles. Well THAT certainly isnt going to work as the chance that the spline for the side gears is the same in both diffs is pretty much nill (plus the lengths may be different also). So, that leads me to finding some newer dayton hubs that take 8 bolt axles. My question is, to those that have done the typical swap from dayton to budd, are all 8 bolt axles the same bolt pattern? and, is there a visual difference between the hubs that came on the B and the newer 5 spoke daltons that take the 8 bolt axles? (or anything else i need to know). 

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I had complete;y forgotten that I have daytons with the 8bolt axles on my parts truck (R model bucket truck). I suppose I could wait until the "new" diff gets here and measure the bolt pattern to see if they are compatible. My parts truck hubs are 5 spoke, the B-61 has 6 spoke but that should still look OK. 

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R-models had both 5 or 6 spoke rear hubs and it depended on the weight rating. The bearings were different but some (many?) axle spindels were the same. Usually 6 bolt jack shaft flanges were used with heavier 6 spoke hubs and had floating shaft and that domed flange (cap) you see at the outside. 8 bolt shafts were made together with the flange. Many Macks of the era (80's) had the same size although other truck brands (non-Mack axles) had them different and the splines either. Also worth to point out I have aluminium budd hubs on a R-model with stud piloted Alcoas and 5 spoke Daytons on MH. Both have similar 8-bolt jack shafts and used the same bearings - 563/567 outer with 572/582 inner. But the seals (surprizingly) are different.

Can not say anything about B-series. And how it looks to me your way is taking both hubs off the axles and check out everything.

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Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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I just converted an '86 Superliner from spoke to budd wheels for a friend of mine. He still has the spoke hubs, rims, spacers, and drums. If you think you need these parts let me know and I will try to get a price for the whole pallet.. P.M. me if you'd like.. jojo

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6 hours ago, Vladislav said:

 Usually 6 bolt jack shaft flanges were used with heavier 6 spoke hubs and had floating shaft and that domed flange (cap) you see at the outside. 8 bolt shafts were made together with the flange. Many Macks of the era (80's) had the same size although other truck brands (non-Mack axles) had them different and the splines either.

My B has 6 spoke with 6 bolt axles (just like you describe) but I'm not sure I follow what you mean about "floating shaft". Is the shaft (axle) not a single forging with the flange? Are you saying the the axle SHAFT and the flange are two separate pieces on the 6 bolt?. 

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1 hour ago, Joey Mack said:

I just converted an '86 Superliner from spoke to budd wheels for a friend of mine. He still has the spoke hubs, rims, spacers, and drums. If you think you need these parts let me know and I will try to get a price for the whole pallet.. P.M. me if you'd like.. jojo

I appreciate the offer but suspect that the shipping would be prohibitive. 

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Yes sir... shipping will be expensive. I just realized you are in Canada.... The axle he is describing is 2 piece, axle and splined hub cap... Jojo

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5 hours ago, Licensed to kill said:

 

My B has 6 spoke with 6 bolt axles (just like you describe) but I'm not sure I follow what you mean about "floating shaft". Is the shaft (axle) not a single forging with the flange? Are you saying the the axle SHAFT and the flange are two separate pieces on the 6 bolt?. 

From 44,000 pound upwards Macks have a separate cap on the end and the axle is splined on both ends and floats between the the cone shaped cap on the hub and the spider gears in the diff 

44's and up in Australia were this way with Mack's

44's have 6 bolts holding the cone to the hub

58's up to around 65 have 8 studs 

And even bigger Macks had 10 studs, dunno what rating they changed and I have never seen one of the real big ones except on photos on this forum

Someone older and much wiser can probably answer that 

I'm a bit lost with what back end your gunna chuck under the B61, I haven't seen it mentioned yet 

 

Paul

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5 hours ago, Licensed to kill said:

 

My B has 6 spoke with 6 bolt axles (just like you describe) but I'm not sure I follow what you mean about "floating shaft". Is the shaft (axle) not a single forging with the flange? Are you saying the the axle SHAFT and the flange are two separate pieces on the 6 bolt?. 

Ok, my gray matter feels a bit more relaxed now since it's evening and it was morning when I typed that post.

Actually the things are more complex. There are (at least) two styles of Mack 6-bolt axle shafts. One of them has slightly domed, about flat flange. About the same look as the 8-bolt flange but for 6 bolts. These shafts are made together with the flange. As one piece, the same as 8-bolt shaft. Another style has a cone look. Also 6 bolts (and the same pattern?) but the center gets outside sufficiently. Those "mushrooms" are a separate castings with inner splines. The shafts used with them are just straight shafts. One end in the differential and another in the mushroom-flange. Interesting point I have this style on my 1945 Mack and there are additional seals which installed right in the "mushrooms'. Ok, caps or flanges, never mind. The reason is they seal against the axle spindel end so oil from diff doesn't go to wheel bearings. And the bearings roll in grease. Not sure newer axles have such desingn either but the outer look of the flanges is almost similar.

I belive 6-bolt flanges were used on 44000 pound axles and 8-bolt ones on 38000 and 34000 axles.

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Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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actually gets more complex.... 38000 and up Macks had the cone or full floating axle shafts with 6 bolts. full floating meanin it floated in that dome cover... and alot of the times with abuse pushed the cover right out.  34000 rears hadthe 8 bolts or 'Rockwell style'' axles. sometime after you could get 38 or 44's with flat cap single floating axles. most b and early r models with cones were 38 or 44s

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18 hours ago, Maddog13407 said:

actually gets more complex.... 38000 and up Macks had the cone or full floating axle shafts with 6 bolts. full floating meanin it floated in that dome cover... and alot of the times with abuse pushed the cover right out.  34000 rears hadthe 8 bolts or 'Rockwell style'' axles. sometime after you could get 38 or 44's with flat cap single floating axles. most b and early r models with cones were 38 or 44s

Im allconfuzzelled now lol

Yes Mack made and sold a huge variety in the U.S. compared to Australia 

I guess the parts supply was in their mind the whole time

Paul

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