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david wild

Paris under attack

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Before we know it will happen here! But don't worry our commander of the golf course tells every one the Isis is under control. Wake up (expletive) and act like a commander in chief!!!!

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Don't forget that o bammy is allowing 20,000 to 35000 Syrian refuges here on an "emergency edict". Guess he needs them to get a few shots in before the elections are cancelled.

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I can assure you that at any one time, the common people are only privy to around 15 to 20 percent of what's going on in the world, who'd doing it, and why. The rest is hidden from view. Think about that.

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Here's a photo of Raqqa, Syria, otherwise known as ISIS Central.

Note that the ISIS headquarters and Islamic court buildings were still standing undisturbed, until France bombed it Sunday night. Odd, isn't it.

Now, for how long has the U.S. been supporting a fight against ISIS, including aerial strikes?

.

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Watching the Sunday Morning shows today.... just unbelievable. Obama seems so incredibly detached.

They say the French bombed an ISIS command center in Raqqa today.... why the f@ck wasn't that command center not blown up months ago????

Somebody is gonna have to grow a pair and start dismantling these extremist without concern collateral damage.

Here's what they should do to Raqqa:

Fotothek_df_ps_0000010_Blick_vom_Rathaus

Dresden 1945.

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Here's a photo of Raqqa, Syria, otherwise known as ISIS Central.

Note that the ISIS headquarters and Islamic court buildings are standing undisturbed. Odd, isn't it.

Now, how long has the U.S. been supporting a fight against ISIS, including aerial strikes?

.

You and I were typing about the same thing at the same time....

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france put twenty some bombs into raqqa today I wonder if that picture still looks the same?

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20 is a nice start.

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france put twenty some bombs into raqqa today I wonder if that picture still looks the same?

A whole 20 bombs. Carpet bombing of the area is more like what I had in mind.

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A whole 20 bombs. Carpet bombing of the area is more like what I had in mind.

promised more tomorrow

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A whole 20 bombs. Carpet bombing of the area is more like what I had in mind.

I guess that it depends on the size/type of those 20 bombs. Twenty MOAB's might well make a good impression. ;)

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Paris attacks: How a ‘really great guy’ became a suicide bomber

The Financial Times / November 15, 2015

Omar Ismael Mostefai was identified by a finger blown off in the blast of the explosive belt he detonated in the Bataclan concert hall — as he tried to kill as many people around him as possible.

But three years ago, in a quiet neighbourhood of Chartres, about an hour’s drive south-west of Paris, he had seemed like any normal local resident.

“Omar was a really great guy: friendly; open,” said a neighbour who knew him and his family between 2005 and 2012, when they moved out. “He talked to the kids; played football with the neighbours.”

Another neighbour, Alexandre, 21, concurred: “Normal — really nothing special.”

The 29-year-old was one of the Islamist terrorists who staged the deadly attacks on Paris on Friday evening. They killed 129 people and wounded more than 350 in a series of co-ordinated and meticulously planned assaults.

Mostefai was also one of at least three French-born attackers in the group. This suggests that the threat from homegrown jihadis has become more severe since January, when three Islamist extremists murdered 17 people in a series of shootings against Charlie Hebdo magazine, the police and a Jewish supermarket in Paris.

“It’s unfortunately not that surprising,” said Sebastien Pietrasanta, a French lawmaker who has written a report on homegrown terrorism. “We’ve moved up to another level with suicide bombings. But the risk of seeing more of this kind of attack is real.”

The threat is particularly acute for France. With about 571 French nationals fighting for Isis or other terrorist organisations, the country has the largest contingent of foreign jihadis in Syria. Up to 141 have died there and about 246 have returned to France, according to French authorities.

This may be the tip of the iceberg. About 2,000 French citizens are thought to be involved in jihadi cells in France, and another 3,800 individuals are said to be showing signs of Islamist radicalization.

Besides Mostefei, two other Frenchmen — two brothers — were being linked by authorities to Friday’s carnage. One blew himself up in a restaurant on Boulevard Voltaire, while police believe that the other may have escaped. On Sunday, officers were hunting for Abdeslam Salah, born in Brussels in 1989.

The first details to emerge of Mostefai show similarities with the group that targeted Paris in January.

Like Saïd and Cherif Kouachi, the brothers who attacked Charlie Hebdo, he was of Algerian origin. Like Amedy Coulibaly, who killed a police officer and four Jewish hostages, he was from Essone, a region on the southeastern outskirts of Paris.

Mostefei was known to police, having been convicted eight times for minor crimes, including driving without a license. But he never spent time in prison, unlike Coulibaly, who became radicalized while in custody.

Mostefei’s birthplace was Courcouronnes, a grim housing estate similar to Grigny, where Coulibaly lived. But Mostefai spent at least eight years in the peaceful and residential Madeleine district, in eastern Chartres, a small town renowned for its medieval cathedral.

There, in a cul de sac, he lived in a two-storey house, with a black door and cream façade, with his parents, two sisters and two brothers. The family had their own indoor garage and a decent-sized back garden overlooking a sports complex. On Sunday, children were riding bicycles and playing football in the street.

Two years before leaving the neighborhood, French intelligence services flagged Mostefei for Islamist radicalization. But neighbors did not spot anything.

“He wore normal clothes, with training shoes — there was no hint of radicalization,” one of them said. His father was retired, and seemed to live off odd jobs, he added. “The mother wore a veil, but nothing out of the ordinary. She wasn’t fanatically religious at all.”

The neighbor also said that both Mostefei’s parents shook the hand of people of the opposite sex, suggesting that they were far from radical in their religious beliefs.

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At the Democratic presidential primary debate on Saturday in Des Moines, Hillary said of ISIS:

"It cannot be an American fight." Rather, "We will support those who take the fight to ISIS."

Now 24 hours later, she's done a total flip-flop saying:

"This is a worldwide fight......I know America has to lead it, but we cannot and should not do it alone."

If you're going to be president of the United States, you can't flip-flop on your position or you lose all credibility with both the American people and foreign leaders (that need to both respect and fear you).

Why does America always have to lead.........and pay the bill. Frankly speaking, we can no longer afford to be the world's policeman (based on what we're told). The result is a 500-ship Navy shrunk to 273 ships, and inferior one-size-fits-all fighter-bombers with no range that put our carriers within range of hostile land-based missiles, our government having abandoned the purchase of vastly superior purpose-designed USN fighters and bombers that once upon a time gave us undisputed air superiority.

Here's a thought, why not have our wealthy friend-of-convenience Saudi Arabia lead the effort? They're one of the king pins in ISIS's neighborhood.

I support helping those who help themselves. But the Arab League is NOT trying to help itself and eliminate ISIS.

Why spill American blood for countries that won't help themselves. Tens of thousands of able-bodied Syrian men ran to Europe, unwilling to fight for the homeland.

And again, speaking of the Arab League countries, why aren't their armed forces fighting ISIS?

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In the worst of Friday's attacks, gunmen stormed the Bataclan theater during a rock concert, taking the audience hostage and firing on them repeatedly. 89 people were killed and many more wounded.

Julien Pearce, a journalist at Europe 1 radio who escaped by crawling onto the stage, said he got a good look at one attacker who appeared "very young."

"That's what struck me, his childish face, very determined, cold, calm, frightening," Pearce said.

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