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What the heck is this beast?


NY-B61
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Road King Moving and Storage, now Road King Transportation has been around since the 1920's (now based in Georgia) , wonder if they built their own trucks like the C.F Freightliners , LaCrosse Auto Carriers, Convoy Auto Carriers or ARCO Auto Carriers. Paul

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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A McCullough Road King is the closest I've ever seen. Thank you, PZ 1! I've included all three pics and noticed only one significant difference. The RK has stamped or rolled side skirts with square wheel openings; the ? has flat metal with semi-circular wheel openings. Other than that they're as near as twins as you can get.

The ? could also be a knockoff of the McCullough Road King. Twin steer buses, for instance, have been made in Mexico since at least the '50's, many copied from GM's stable of 'new', at the time, streamlined body styles.

I sure appreciate the info so far. The identity of this thing has been like a worn toilet flapper under my saddle for the better part of a decade. Off to research the Road King.

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Bus examples

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post-15438-0-30587100-1402709314_thumb.j

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More we look at the truck the more we have come to the conclusion it is based on a mid 50's Fruehauf or Trailer Mobile unit look at the general details of the units. I lean towards Freuhauf because of last photo of the Fruehauf Sport Cruiser

1956 Fruehauf

post-3242-0-90078800-1402776848_thumb.jp

1962 Trailer Mobile

post-3242-0-56949200-1402776859_thumb.jp

Museum de Transport, Caracas, Venezuela. Describes this as a 1959 Road King Nestle coffee transporter

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Fruehauf Sport Cruiser

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"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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You are probably correct in that 41chevy. Fageol also used Fruehauf trailers and I wonder if there was some connection between Fageol and the Road King. Fageol quit production in 1954 and it looks like the Road King was started in 1956. Possibly someone involved in Fageol started the McCullogh Motor Co?

Many of the Fageol's were lighter and smaller than the Road King, but they did have a similar model, except instead of two front axles, it had a single with dual wheels. The Fageol was called a "Super Freighter".

$_1.JPG

Found this.

http://www.newspapers.com/clip/654125/the_gazette_and_daily/?

It appears Road King's may have been made in the Fredericksburg/Lebanon area.

A good truck for a company dealing in "Poultry Parts".

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Might be just a coincidence,but the shape of the windshield and center emblem reminds me of a Crown school bus?...........................................Mark

It's starting to look like the vehicle could have been manufactured from a number of existing assemblies. Production tool and dies would be hideously expensive if starting from scratch. Several prototypes could be made using components readily available during that era.

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More we look at the truck the more we have come to the conclusion it is based on a mid 50's Fruehauf or Trailer Mobile unit look at the general details of the units. I lean towards Freuhauf because of last photo of the Fruehauf Sport Cruiser

1956 Fruehauf

attachicon.gif56Frue.JPG

1962 Trailer Mobile

attachicon.gif1962trailermobile.JPG

Museum de Transport, Caracas, Venezuela. Describes this as a 1959 Road King Nestle coffee transporter

attachicon.gifc84ea5be-ee8e-405a-9030-aa0a.jpg

Fruehauf Sport Cruiser

attachicon.giffreuhauf-sportcruiser.jpg

Hands down, the Sports Cruiser is one cool vehicle! I like the rig pulling it also. I can't find anything anywhere of any substance on the McCullough company as it relates to truck manufacturing. Could the vehicle I originally posted be a McCullough prototype assembled using Freuhauf, GM and other available components? There are minor differences in the pictures kindly posted so far by others, but many identicalities as well.

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You are probably correct in that 41chevy. Fageol also used Fruehauf trailers and I wonder if there was some connection between Fageol and the Road King. Fageol quit production in 1954 and it looks like the Road King was started in 1956. Possibly someone involved in Fageol started the McCullogh Motor Co?

Many of the Fageol's were lighter and smaller than the Road King, but they did have a similar model, except instead of two front axles, it had a single with dual wheels. The Fageol was called a "Super Freighter".

$_1.JPG

Found this.

http://www.newspapers.com/clip/654125/the_gazette_and_daily/?

It appears Road King's may have been made in the Fredericksburg/Lebanon area.

A good truck for a company dealing in "Poultry Parts".

I was unable to open the link but I'm glad to hear the behemoths were most likely made in the USA. It appears as if several companies were experimenting with the concept of a shorter, non-articulated highway rig. Poultry parts makes sense on two levels, PZ 1. Gainesville, Georgia is/was the poultry capitol of the U.S. and this truck did have a Georgia sticker on it. Also, many of the pics found and posted so far show these rigs set up as reefers. Lebanon, Pa continues to be a meat capital now as it was throughout the 40's and 50's but on a smaller scale. Could the four axles have been necessary to cope with the crappy Pennsylvania 'hiways' of the time?

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You are probably correct in that 41chevy. Fageol also used Fruehauf trailers and I wonder if there was some connection between Fageol and the Road King. Fageol quit production in 1954 and it looks like the Road King was started in 1956. Possibly someone involved in Fageol started the McCullogh Motor Co?

Many of the Fageol's were lighter and smaller than the Road King, but they did have a similar model, except instead of two front axles, it had a single with dual wheels. The Fageol was called a "Super Freighter".

$_1.JPG

Found this.

http://www.newspapers.com/clip/654125/the_gazette_and_daily/?

It appears Road King's may have been made in the Fredericksburg/Lebanon area.

A good truck for a company dealing in "Poultry Parts".

One thing is the time frame of the early mid 50's, A perfect idea to beat the length laws of the time tractor trailer ( 42 foot total length law Illinois had). It sure would have saved time wasted tucking the trailer up to the cab to get that and than moving it back for local use.

I saw a lot of similarities between Fageol, but how much different can adding a drivers compartment on a trailer. Fruehauf also made Mobil Televison Broadcast trailers for KTLA T.V. in 1954 and they were used until 1967. Fruehauf also converted a pair of Crown buses to Box Trucks for Red Skelton in 1962. Paul

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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Try this link:

http://www.newspapers.com/clip/654125//

Almost everything on these trucks was probably sourced from other companies. But that was not unusual with many other companies that made trucks. They were most likely bus windshields. The Road King had the engine in the rear, so it was probably a bus powertrain.

Interesting! I see Brighbill Body Works was tied it with Wayne Busses.

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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Try this link:

http://www.newspapers.com/clip/654125//

Almost everything on these trucks was probably sourced from other companies. But that was not unusual with many other companies that made trucks. They were most likely bus windshields. The Road King had the engine in the rear, so it was probably a bus powertrain.

The link worked great, thank you! The concept of building these things from components off the shelf reminds me of what Tucker did with automobiles.

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One thing is the time frame of the early mid 50's, A perfect idea to beat the length laws of the time tractor trailer ( 42 foot total length law Illinois had). It sure would have saved time wasted tucking the trailer up to the cab to get that and than moving it back for local use.

I saw a lot of similarities between Fageol, but how much different can adding a drivers compartment on a trailer. Fruehauf also made Mobil Televison Broadcast trailers for KTLA T.V. in 1954 and they were used until 1967. Fruehauf also converted a pair of GMC buses to Box Trucks for Red Skelton in 1952. Paul

You're right, length and weight laws were all over the place depending on which state or burg you found yourself in. The Road King could have been built with the myriad of state and local regulations of the time in mind. Now we know what a truck built around regulations as opposed to efficiency and common sense looks like. :lol:

I'd be interested in seeing any pictures you might have of Red Skelton's bus-based box trucks. Buses are another illness of mine. Thanks for a great answer!

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