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randyp
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You all remember when you went in the Parts store before the age of computers and they looked everything up in a parts book? The store I traded in here for years, one man owned and ran in by himself. He had this huge steel shelf or rack on the counter in front of him, and when you told him what you needed, he licked his finger, reached into the rack and usually moved a big load of books to one side or the other, he always seemed to land at the right place in the big stack.,When you paid him, he wrote it up on a receipt machine with a crank handle, turned the crank, and gave you your copy. He mixed paint, put acid in batteries, and usually gave excellent, correct diagnosis of what you needed to buy, based on what you told him. Dam,,,i miss those days,,,,randy

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You all remember when you went in the Parts store before the age of computers and they looked everything up in a parts book? The store I traded in here for years, one man owned and ran in by himself. He had this huge steel shelf or rack on the counter in front of him, and when you told him what you needed, he licked his finger, reached into the rack and usually moved a big load of books to one side or the other, he always seemed to land at the right place in the big stack.,When you paid him, he wrote it up on a receipt machine with a crank handle, turned the crank, and gave you your copy. He mixed paint, put acid in batteries, and usually gave excellent, correct diagnosis of what you needed to buy, based on what you told him. Dam,,,i miss those days,,,,randy

I remember that very well.

Guess that means I'm getting old!!!!!!!!

Funny thing is, in those days, without the "help" of computers, it seemed like I always got the right part, and it was usually in stock. None of this "we'll have it for you tomorrow" B.S.

.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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You all remember when you went in the Parts store before the age of computers and they looked everything up in a parts book? The store I traded in here for years, one man owned and ran in by himself. He had this huge steel shelf or rack on the counter in front of him, and when you told him what you needed, he licked his finger, reached into the rack and usually moved a big load of books to one side or the other, he always seemed to land at the right place in the big stack.,When you paid him, he wrote it up on a receipt machine with a crank handle, turned the crank, and gave you your copy. He mixed paint, put acid in batteries, and usually gave excellent, correct diagnosis of what you needed to buy, based on what you told him. Dam,,,i miss those days,,,,randy

You used to be able to get parts books for a specific chassis. After books came microfiche. When computers came along they got rid of almost all of the old books and the microfiche (strangely enough they still have the microfiche machine). If those books/microfiche were available I think I would have a Burgess Meredith/Twilight Zone type of breakdown

"Mebbe I'm too ugly and stupid to give up!"

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i remenber the days very well but do you thing you would want to stand there that the time it would take to look somthing up by a book with some one that has not been in the store very long. I think not. The PC has spoild us. The reason it was simple back then is because like cummins they had maybe two different pistons and injectors and one turbo fit all and no EPA junk to worry about and DD had a white tag or brown tag injector.caT HAD NOT GOT STARTED IN TRUCKS AND MACK was a 673 or a 711 so things were more simple in that respect.And ever one made less than two dollars a hour.That is in the mid 60s. I dont know about the 50s.and in the 40s i guess the guys made their own parts.My father in law said the only good thing about the old days was they are gone.

glenn akers

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im not that old but I remember the parts books. what I really liked was pumping my gas/diesel and then going in after I was done filling up.

now its..... going in to pay, going back out to pump....going in to get your recipt and snacks...back out to you car..... and they dident have cameras back them to catch people driving off because it rarely happend...

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Yes guys I remember those parts houses fondly. I recall two different stores, one having a engine rebuilding area in the basement called Auto Bearings and Parts. The sign and building are the only thing left. The other place was called Shelby Street Auto Parts. They rebuilt starters and generators.The Shelby Street bridge is still there but only used now for pedestrian traffic for the Titans Football Fans and the Shelby Street Auto Parts store is history for those that still have a memory. I have not rebuilt anything since 1990 and since i've owned my B Model for two years now,I was looking for a radiator shop only to find there were only a few left in Nashville. That was a real eye opener for me. And yes I remember the big auto manuals in the rack. Things were organized and people were glad to help you. I'm proud to have lived during that time in history.

Oh yea bout to forget.....I recall an auto parts store called Madam Mopar with women working the counters. That in itself was a real pleasure to visit but, I didn't own a Mopar. :pat:

mike

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Man i miss those days as well!,i can remember going in to our local mack dealer and they actually had what you wanted in stock! knew what it was,where it went,and usually could offer install advise/tips! nowadays they have NOTHING in stock,and i mean nothing! unless you want a hat or a license plate frame! i mean this dealer stocked frame rails,fuel tanks,rears,hoods,trimmed cabs on pallets! the guy i'm talking about is still the parts guy for the company that bought out the mack dealer, is still there,still does things "old school" only uses the computer when he has to. And he does'nt need the last 6 of my VIN# to look up a part! when i ask for an oil filter for an 01' CX,thats what i get! guys like this are getting fewer and farther between thats for sure! me personally,i think people today rely on computers to do too much of their thinking for them! so if you ever find youself in south jersey and are in need of a mack part,be sure to give melvin street (streetzy) at bergeys truck center(formerly horner mack) in vineland,NJ a call! if he can't find what you want nobody can!.......Mark

Mack Truck literate. Computer illiterate.

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The rack of books, but most important, it smelled like oil and grease. Now they kinda smell like a French whore (sorry Frenchy)

In back, they could test, rebuild just about anything. Machine cyl heads.

Where I grew up, two brothers owned the business. One was up front, the other, i don't think he knew there was a front door. LOL

Success is only a stones throw away.................................................................for a Palestinian

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The rack of books, but most important, it smelled like oil and grease. Now they kinda smell like a French whore (sorry Frenchy)

In back, they could test, rebuild just about anything. Machine cyl heads.

Where I grew up, two brothers owned the business. One was up front, the other, i don't think he knew there was a front door. LOL

heh heh,,yeah, thas what im talking bout hatcity. We still got one place in nother town bout 20 miles away, 3 men , all in their seventies run it, its a starter, generator, electical rebuild shop. They work on air conditoners too. These 3 guys know their business inside out, when they work on something,,its fixed! They all 3 wear leather aprons, got parts and stuff scattered everywhere, store smells oily, and they dont put you off, they work on it right when you come in the door, even let you stand by and watch them tear into something. I needed a starter solenoid for 69 galion motorgrader bout a month ago, took it off, stopped in local chain parts store in town cause i was in a hurry. They wanted to order it, take 3 days to get it, and cost $88.00. I told them I would find it, drove twenty miles to starter shop, walked in door, showed them, old guy reached up on shelf over his head, gave it to me and charged me $22.00, the exact solenoid! Now thats service you got to just appreciate! Dont care what anybody says, those were the good ole days,,randy

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heh heh,,yeah, thas what im talking bout hatcity. We still got one place in nother town bout 20 miles away, 3 men , all in their seventies run it, its a starter, generator, electical rebuild shop. They work on air conditoners too. These 3 guys know their business inside out, when they work on something,,its fixed! They all 3 wear leather aprons, got parts and stuff scattered everywhere, store smells oily, and they dont put you off, they work on it right when you come in the door, even let you stand by and watch them tear into something. I needed a starter solenoid for 69 galion motorgrader bout a month ago, took it off, stopped in local chain parts store in town cause i was in a hurry. They wanted to order it, take 3 days to get it, and cost $88.00. I told them I would find it, drove twenty miles to starter shop, walked in door, showed them, old guy reached up on shelf over his head, gave it to me and charged me $22.00, the exact solenoid! Now thats service you got to just appreciate! Dont care what anybody says, those were the good ole days,,randy

I remember the old parts book. It just burns me up now to go to a parts store for a generic type item like a wheel stud or headlight and they want to know the make and model of the vehicle so they can look it up. Advance Auto Parts is the worst. I stopped at the one in Dillwyn one time to get a low beam headlight for the truck- a 2A1 I think it is, you can get them anywhere and they're all the same. First thing the guy wanted to know was the make and model of the vehicle. I didn't figure they listed Peterbilt parts anyway so I said "i'm building a spaceship in the backyard and I want to put headlights on it". He just stood there looking stupid and speechless. Then I started to leave and the woman in there went and got one off the shelf and put it on the counter. I paid for it and as I was leaving she said "good luck with your spaceship".

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Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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I remember the old parts book. It just burns me up now to go to a parts store for a generic type item like a wheel stud or headlight and they want to know the make and model of the vehicle so they can look it up. Advance Auto Parts is the worst. I stopped at the one in Dillwyn one time to get a low beam headlight for the truck- a 2A1 I think it is, you can get them anywhere and they're all the same. First thing the guy wanted to know was the make and model of the vehicle. I didn't figure they listed Peterbilt parts anyway so I said "i'm building a spaceship in the backyard and I want to put headlights on it". He just stood there looking stupid and speechless. Then I started to leave and the woman in there went and got one off the shelf and put it on the counter. I paid for it and as I was leaving she said "good luck with your spaceship".

LOL,,I think we may have the same attitude, OD,,,I like that story! randy

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This is a good subject! i know there have been many advances in technology regarding cars and trucks over the last century,but i long for the days when people who worked on cars and trucks for a living were mechanics,not "technicians" and would actually try and diagnose a mechanical problem before starting to throw parts and money at it! my maternal grandfather was one of these guys,he could barely read or write,but could machine,repair,weld,build,re-build damn near ANYTHING that was put in front of him! if a job or part was not to his liking,he would re-build or re-do the part to his satisfaction,before making out his "bill" he repaired a cracked block on an old 8-N ford tractor we had on the farm 46 years ago,and i know for a fact its still running,and still used almost daily! just kinda' bothers me that no one seems to take this kind of pride in their work anymore,seems to be a "let somebody else worry about it now" not my job type world............Mark

Mack Truck literate. Computer illiterate.

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This is a good subject! i know there have been many advances in technology regarding cars and trucks over the last century,but i long for the days when people who worked on cars and trucks for a living were mechanics,not "technicians" and would actually try and diagnose a mechanical problem before starting to throw parts and money at it! my maternal grandfather was one of these guys,he could barely read or write,but could machine,repair,weld,build,re-build damn near ANYTHING that was put in front of him! if a job or part was not to his liking,he would re-build or re-do the part to his satisfaction,before making out his "bill" he repaired a cracked block on an old 8-N ford tractor we had on the farm 46 years ago,and i know for a fact its still running,and still used almost daily! just kinda' bothers me that no one seems to take this kind of pride in their work anymore,seems to be a "let somebody else worry about it now" not my job type world............Mark

Yeah, your right Mark, and we are running out of those kind of people. I really miss those days a lot. randy

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In that time frame my local Mack shop was a Mom&Pop where Pop ran the shop and raised 3 boys who knew every part for a Mack and how to install them. Mom and her sister sold trucks.

Our local Detroit-GMC shop was the same story with his 2 sons. Both the shops used books and went extinct about the time they all had to go to computers..

Corporate shops have replaced both dealers now but it was fun while it lasted. I was always amazed when I went in and ask for something that even the children knew where to go get my parts off the rack without looking at a book and how to bill it out.

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This is a good subject! i know there have been many advances in technology regarding cars and trucks over the last century,but i long for the days when people who worked on cars and trucks for a living were mechanics,not "technicians" and would actually try and diagnose a mechanical problem before starting to throw parts and money at it! my maternal grandfather was one of these guys,he could barely read or write,but could machine,repair,weld,build,re-build damn near ANYTHING that was put in front of him! if a job or part was not to his liking,he would re-build or re-do the part to his satisfaction,before making out his "bill" he repaired a cracked block on an old 8-N ford tractor we had on the farm 46 years ago,and i know for a fact its still running,and still used almost daily! just kinda' bothers me that no one seems to take this kind of pride in their work anymore,seems to be a "let somebody else worry about it now" not my job type world............Mark

One of the first things I learned was how to rebuild starters-pretty easy putting new bushings,brushes,and a bendix in.But nobody does it now-like honing and rebuilding a wheel cylinder,you just go buy a rebuilt unit and slap it on.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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One of the first things I learned was how to rebuild starters-pretty easy putting new bushings,brushes,and a bendix in.But nobody does it now-like honing and rebuilding a wheel cylinder,you just go buy a rebuilt unit and slap it on.

I should point out that much of the reason the local rebuild industry is gone is that manufacturers have made many of the parts needed for rebuilding their products so expensive that, by the time labor for the rebuild is added in, it is cost prohibitive to rebuild many items. Also consider that the number of individual parts that must be stocked in order to cover the many variations of a assembly causes more capital to be tied up than if a complete unit is stocked instead. The rebuild industry has declined in recent years so much that now the ASE has decided to eliminate it's Engine Machinist test series.

As far as mechanic versus technician, much of that is just an image type of thing being pushed by manufacturers. At some point in the past, "mechanic" was viewed as a dirty and greasy job, so it was changed to "technician" which I suppose was seen as cleaner and more "white collar" (why this would be desirable in the trucking industry I don't know). It seems like "technician" has come to have a negative connotation and means less "hands on" I think Mark is right on the money. A little extra time inspecting a truck and a firm understanding of the workings of various systems on a truck go a long way towards making a lasting repair.

"Mebbe I'm too ugly and stupid to give up!"

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Mechanic vs technician is really related to the engine type. Mechanical engines were a straight forward machine. Listening to it, many "good' mechanics could diagnose the problem. And a couple things here and there to check and replace the proper part.

Now, with computerized units, the computer "should" diagnose the problem. BUT, to get the proper replacement. Many of you gentlemen here have told that the engine computer has to be re-flashed because a part was changed.

A $2.00 part was changed but the re-flash cost, what $300 or more.

But what do I know, I just stab it and steer it

Success is only a stones throw away.................................................................for a Palestinian

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Mechanic vs technician is really related to the engine type. Mechanical engines were a straight forward machine. Listening to it, many "good' mechanics could diagnose the problem. And a couple things here and there to check and replace the proper part.

Now, with computerized units, the computer "should" diagnose the problem. BUT, to get the proper replacement. Many of you gentlemen here have told that the engine computer has to be re-flashed because a part was changed.

A $2.00 part was changed but the re-flash cost, what $300 or more.

But what do I know, I just stab it and steer it

All heve excellent, good, true valid points. Why cant politicians see things as clearly as we do on here? randy

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I should point out that much of the reason the local rebuild industry is gone is that manufacturers have made many of the parts needed for rebuilding their products so expensive that, by the time labor for the rebuild is added in, it is cost prohibitive to rebuild many items. Also consider that the number of individual parts that must be stocked in order to cover the many variations of a assembly causes more capital to be tied up than if a complete unit is stocked instead. The rebuild industry has declined in recent years so much that now the ASE has decided to eliminate it's Engine Machinist test series.

As far as mechanic versus technician, much of that is just an image type of thing being pushed by manufacturers. At some point in the past, "mechanic" was viewed as a dirty and greasy job, so it was changed to "technician" which I suppose was seen as cleaner and more "white collar" (why this would be desirable in the trucking industry I don't know). It seems like "technician" has come to have a negative connotation and means less "hands on" I think Mark is right on the money. A little extra time inspecting a truck and a firm understanding of the workings of various systems on a truck go a long way towards making a lasting repair.

Yep,that was my point,a little extra time on the diagnosis goes a long way! i wish they would listen a little closer when you come in with a problem as well, i was at the mack dealer in albuquerque,NM last year with a leaking rear wheelseal,( straightfoward problem as far as i'm concerned) ended up with a $1200.00 bill for the replacement of the coolant tank (again!) new throttle position sensor,numerous other sundry B.S., all without a consult first! one of the worst shops i have encountered! made a mess out of my truck,grease,cigarette ashes all over the place,grease,filth all over the fairings! of course i had a fit! I am normally not a hard person to get along with,but i take a great deal of pride/time in the effort to keep my tractor up, and don't think it's asking too much for a little consideration/professionalism when having repairs done! some shops still treat you very well,others not so much! but the "good" ones are getting fewer and farther between!........Mark

Mack Truck literate. Computer illiterate.

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This is a good subject! i know there have been many advances in technology regarding cars and trucks over the last century,but i long for the days when people who worked on cars and trucks for a living were mechanics,not "technicians" and would actually try and diagnose a mechanical problem before starting to throw parts and money at it! my maternal grandfather was one of these guys,he could barely read or write,but could machine,repair,weld,build,re-build damn near ANYTHING that was put in front of him! if a job or part was not to his liking,he would re-build or re-do the part to his satisfaction,before making out his "bill" he repaired a cracked block on an old 8-N ford tractor we had on the farm 46 years ago,and i know for a fact its still running,and still used almost daily! just kinda' bothers me that no one seems to take this kind of pride in their work anymore,seems to be a "let somebody else worry about it now" not my job type world............Mark

Mark, Randy

Yaw going to make me start crying in a minute. I'm feeling everday now like i'm in a foreign country and lost and no where to go. My dad and his dad was that kind of persons. They could take crap and make something good from it. It was fun to grow up handing them tools and moving outa tha way trying to learn something. Ok i'm through rambling.

mike

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Mark, Randy

Yaw going to make me start crying in a minute. I'm feeling everday now like i'm in a foreign country and lost and no where to go. My dad and his dad was that kind of persons. They could take crap and make something good from it. It was fun to grow up handing them tools and moving outa tha way trying to learn something. Ok i'm through rambling.

mike

Mike,,I think thats whats making me dwell on those days, my dad was the same way, we worked together for several years. Hes been gone 15 years now. I can tear something up or breakdown and when im working on it, i keep looking around, waiting for his advice. My uncle worked with us and he was the same way, 2 very gifted, talented people. they are both gone now and really miss their advice and skills. Now, im through rambling. randy

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