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Why Ruin A Perfectly Good Truck?


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:pat: Somebody has an R600 on ebay with what looks to be maybe a C-12 Cat in it. I don't know why anybody would ruin a perfectly good truck by sticking a bull-dozer motor under a bull dog?

What's this world comming to?post-2383-1246713495.jpg

it could have been worse

At least it is not a 350 chevy or any other gaser :pat:

but still they have messed up that truck

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I HAVE SEEN A COUPLE OF MACK R700 SUPERLINERS WITH CATERPILLAR ENGINES (MECHANICAL 3406) AND A BIG V8 3408 STUFFFED UNDER THE HOOD OF ANOTHER MACK (F700)

THE WORST ONE ? A RARE BIG R MODEL WITH THAT HORRENDOUS AND NOISY DETROIT DIESEL 8V92

THIS PUPPIES LOST THEIR PURE BREED

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:pat: Somebody has an R600 on ebay with what looks to be maybe a C-12 Cat in it. I don't know why anybody would ruin a perfectly good truck by sticking a bull-dozer motor under a bull dog?

What's this world comming to?post-2383-1246713495.jpg

Yup, looks like a C12!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I get up close & personal with those on a daily basis.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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Guest 45LMSWM

Dave,

Back in the mid 1990s, Leahman Tank Lines repowered a large fleet of their R-models tractors with 3176B truck engines, the predecessor to the C12. We used to get them in all the time at the dealer where I work. I believe Cat dealers did the engine swaps, as well.

I also spent several years as a driver's helper in a 1975 Mack DM800 that had been repowered with a 3406A 400. That truck was a monster.

John

Edited by 45LMSWM
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PROVAN Transport here in NY state back in the 70's had a large fleet of R600's with DD318's and 10 speeds in them. I think they were cut back to 270 or something. Real screamers.. Mike

Is it just me or did those buffalo wings taste like chicken?

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Dave,

Back in the mid 1990s, Leahman Tank Lines repowered a large fleet of their R-models tractors with 3176B truck engines, the predecessor to the C12. We used to get them in all the time at the dealer where I work. I believe Cat dealers did the engine swaps, as well.

I also spent several years as a driver's helper in a 1975 Mack DM800 that had been repowered with a 3406A 400. That truck was a monster.

John

I should probably qualify my remarks here. Mack power is by far the preference of most Mack users, but historically Mack often times came up "short" in the horsepower offerings department. Before the availability of the E9's in certain models, like the DM800's, if a customer wanted to "break" the 300 - 350 hosepower barrier, vendor engines were the only choice.

Even when E9's did become available, people still had a bad taste in their mouths from the earlier failings of the 865 /866 engines, and they were pricey, and that also opened the door to other altenatives. In the most recent engine options in the CL's, Mack offered 3406 Cats, and S60 Detroits, but they were built in limited numbers. I don't remember if there were any Cummins offerings in the CL before the demise of the E9's, which were replaced by the ISX & Signature Cummins.

Mack trucks over the years was lucky enough to experience the highest brand loyalty of any truck manufacturer, despite some of their engine problems. Who knows how much longer they can say that. Every time an engine family reached maturity, the Feds raised the bar, and everyone started over again.

I'm a Mack guy. Unfortunately, I think we've seen the glory days of Mack Trucks, I hope I'm wrong. I would love to be wrong. That's my story, and I'm stickin to it!!

Dave

Edited by daveigou

See my Flickr photostream page

http://www.flickr.com/photos/96692978@N05/

 

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The worst I seen was a single axle MH flight kit with a 6-71, Allison and rear out of a fire truck. I cant imagine a gutless 6-71 and an old Allison in an 80's tractor. Was used to haul a horse trailer. The C-12 in an R600 to me is not that bad of a thing.

-Thad

What America needs is less bull and more Bulldog!

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Ain't nothin wrong with a Cat in a Mack; But only if Mack built it that way.

Rob

post-78-1247017396_thumb.jpg

post-78-1247017443_thumb.jpg

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Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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One of the fleets with trucks leased to the carrier I'm with has a lot of Mack trucks...one in particular has a kitty cat under the hood. The motor that was in the truck was plum wore out, and they had the Cat sitting around in the shop ready to go...so they swapped it in. Minimized the downtime, and a Cat under the hood is better than tryin' ta run down the road fully loaded with anyone else's wore out motor. :wacko:

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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I like the macks for the off road but not everone is a mack fan. I agree that one of the down sides of the older macks was that they did not offer off breed "standard power" as a more common alternative options. I think that a good running 300 mack is just fine for the city but pull hills all day and that 500 cat looks alot better. the only down side I see with off breed power is that they all had higher operation costs and they were not as easy to work on as the old ENDT675-676 /E6 etc... I have only driven one mack that had an off breed motor and I like it. It was a 350 big cam cummins. it would run away from all the 300 macks in the hills but could not out pull from them stop lights with all the shifting going on.

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One of the advantages Mack had with the Mack Westerns was the ability to offer "vendor" powertrain components to customers who liked Mack but wanted someone else's engine/tranny/axles. For example, some of Continental Baking's fleet managers preferred Macks, while some of their fleet managers preferred Detroit Diesel power. They also had mechanics that were familiar with Detroits and had built up a parts stock for them. By offering Continental Baking a Detroit engine in a Mack FS cabover Mack was able to make a sale of 200 trucks that otherwise wouldn't have happened.

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One of the advantages Mack had with the Mack Westerns was the ability to offer "vendor" powertrain components to customers who liked Mack but wanted someone else's engine/tranny/axles. For example, some of Continental Baking's fleet managers preferred Macks, while some of their fleet managers preferred Detroit Diesel power. They also had mechanics that were familiar with Detroits and had built up a parts stock for them. By offering Continental Baking a Detroit engine in a Mack FS cabover Mack was able to make a sale of 200 trucks that otherwise wouldn't have happened.

nothing wrong with a putty cat, most the prime movers down here in Western Australia run them, they pull well and pretty reliable.

there is an R700 for sale in kalgoorlie for 15000 with an 8v92 in it. that could be interesting.

Grant

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nothing wrong with a putty cat, most the prime movers down here in Western Australia run them, they pull well and pretty reliable.

there is an R700 for sale in kalgoorlie for 15000 with an 8v92 in it. that could be interesting.

Grant

Grant, send me your email addrss. I'm out of posting room on the board and want to send some photos your way.

Thanks,

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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I am sorry about the 350 coment

She's just razzin on ya. Don't take it to heart.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Every coin has two sides. By re-powering with a known good engine, that was available, they probably saved a decent R model from oblivion. It might have gone to the scrap heap, or the shredder. These days you are not going to have an engine of any manufacture overhauled, for much less than $8,000. Usually a lot more. It is still a Mack, somebody can still use it for a while. It is not ruined, an R model is so tough that only rust or a major catastrophe can defeat one.

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thank you for the razzin' and I am taking to heart

tree fifty (350) is a decent gas engine and that is coming from a Dodge boy 2nd to Macks

Brand don't matter as long as it American built (or at least American plants)

with American jobs.

but any ways back to the trucks and issuses

I don't want to upset any who can brake down a 10.00 x 20 with tools in their pocket book

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Every coin has two sides. By re-powering with a known good engine, that was available, they probably saved a decent R model from oblivion. It might have gone to the scrap heap, or the shredder. These days you are not going to have an engine of any manufacture overhauled, for much less than $8,000. Usually a lot more. It is still a Mack, somebody can still use it for a while. It is not ruined, an R model is so tough that only rust or a major catastrophe can defeat one.

James has been through this & has a damn fine truck out of it. I think a Mack is the best of both worlds so to speak. With a 350 cummins, cat, detroit, or just straight mack power. That Bulldog is still on the hood. Just my .02 cents

This message was brought to you by Hargraves Potted Meat Product. Chopped full of "Peckers & Lips" since 1933 - John Boy & Billy

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I like the macks for the off road but not everone is a mack fan. I agree that one of the down sides of the older macks was that they did not offer off breed "standard power" as a more common alternative options. I think that a good running 300 mack is just fine for the city but pull hills all day and that 500 cat looks alot better. the only down side I see with off breed power is that they all had higher operation costs and they were not as easy to work on as the old ENDT675-676 /E6 etc... I have only driven one mack that had an off breed motor and I like it. It was a 350 big cam cummins. it would run away from all the 300 macks in the hills but could not out pull from them stop lights with all the shifting going on.

that's like the F-models I drove, one a 300 five speed, the other a 350 Cummins with a 10 speed Roadranger.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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