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New Tires


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I am no expert on truck tires, most of my mechanical experience is with light vehicles, but I assume there must be some differences with rubber compounds used. Some softer and some harder? One of the fire engines at the fire department I work at, got a new set of rear tires (Michelens), I don't recall what brand of tire was on the the truck before. Anywho, the engine used to be a joy to drive, seemed solid and gripped the road. Ever since the new hoops, the truck is a real turd! Feels like a wet noodle. The slightest lane change and the thinks feels like shes going to roll! Need nerves of steel to drive it. I suppose now that they are on there, we will have to live with them, even thought everyone that drives it is bitching.

Dave

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I had (...well, have) the same problem when I got 8 new drive tires put on my truck last year. When I bought the truck it had a mis-matched set of about 6 different brands of tires on it, but went down the road like a dream. After the 8 new tires were put on the handling is a bit wishy-washy and I've been blessed with an intermittent 'hop'. While I'll admit, the tires I bought weren't the highest priced/quality tires on the market, but still they were a matched set of new tires. Due to the nature of the work I do...construction work...a lot of stopping/starting and turning and off-road...I'm not going to grind off a set of $400+ tires in 50,000 miles.

I'm sure a lot of it has to do with new rubber being more flexible...and more tread enabling the tire to feel as if it 'rolls'. As my tires wear down that feeling has more or less gone away.

Ever wonder how a blind person knows when to stop wiping?

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I had (...well, have) the same problem when I got 8 new drive tires put on my truck last year. When I bought the truck it had a mis-matched set of about 6 different brands of tires on it, but went down the road like a dream. After the 8 new tires were put on the handling is a bit wishy-washy and I've been blessed with an intermittent 'hop'. While I'll admit, the tires I bought weren't the highest priced/quality tires on the market, but still they were a matched set of new tires. Due to the nature of the work I do...construction work...a lot of stopping/starting and turning and off-road...I'm not going to grind off a set of $400+ tires in 50,000 miles.

I'm sure a lot of it has to do with new rubber being more flexible...and more tread enabling the tire to feel as if it 'rolls'. As my tires wear down that feeling has more or less gone away.

But even when the truck was brand new with matched virgin rubber...the truck road like a dream. That is why I wonder that there are different grades, or pliability?

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Two things come to mind with your problem. Be sure it does not have bias ply tires on the front that will cause that problem. Then the other thing I think of is load rating on the tire. Fire trucks often use a larger or heavier tire than freight trucks. Part of the reason is to control sway from a water tank sloshing. Michelin makes a very good truck tire it just sounds like the application is wrong.

Chuck

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Michelin makes a very good truck tire it just sounds like the application is wrong.

Chuck

I agree with Chuck on the Michelin tires. Air pressure is vital in that application also.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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I have experienced the same situation on road tractors, when replacing worn out tires with a full set of cross bar or lugged type drive tires. The problem always went away after a few thousand miles, as the tires began to wear in. Inflation pressure is critical to performance and tire life. On a set of new tires the " Roll Out", or inflated diameter will always vary somewhat. Usually not enough to create a problem. A rough tread tire with lugs sticking out every which way, compounds the problem. A few thousand miles on a fire truck, which I am assuming sits most of the time might be another problem. A single axle truck will behave differently than a tandem axle. Before I blamed it all on the tires, I would check the axle and spring mounting points for something loose.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have had the same problem before when only replacing the drive tires. I had Bridgestone V-Steel's all the way around on an old truck and it drove great. I put new Goodyears on the rear later and the truck felt like the rear end was about to fall out. I ended up bitching enough they took the Goodyears back. I bought 4 more V-Steel's and everything was back to normal, the truck drove fine again. The Goodyear regional rep. explained that the V-Steel's sidewall was much stiffer than the Goodyear so any steering input was being magnified by the Goodyear sidewall flex. He said it would have been fine if there were Goodyears up front too, but at that point I just wanted my V-Steel's back.

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  • 4 months later...

Well, after a visit from a Michelen rep, they agreed to go half way with us on a new set of tires. They are the same load rating, but a different design...still Michelen. Truck drives like a dream again. Must have been something with the first set.

Thanks for the replies and Happy Easter

Dave

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I have experienced the same situation on road tractors, when replacing worn out tires with a full set of cross bar or lugged type drive tires. The problem always went away after a few thousand miles, as the tires began to wear in. Inflation pressure is critical to performance and tire life. On a set of new tires the " Roll Out", or inflated diameter will always vary somewhat. Usually not enough to create a problem. A rough tread tire with lugs sticking out every which way, compounds the problem. A few thousand miles on a fire truck, which I am assuming sits most of the time might be another problem. A single axle truck will behave differently than a tandem axle. Before I blamed it all on the tires, I would check the axle and spring mounting points for something loose.

I had the exact same situation myself. Last time I got a new set of drive tires it felt like I was driving on ice at first. By the time i'd made one trip it was unnoticable.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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Well, after a visit from a Michelen rep, they agreed to go half way with us on a new set of tires. They are the same load rating, but a different design...still Michelen. Truck drives like a dream again. Must have been something with the first set.

Thanks for the replies and Happy Easter

Dave

Dave,

What designs were the first and final Michelins? I have XDN2 on the rear and XZA3 on the front.

Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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Dave,

What designs were the first and final Michelins? I have XDN2 on the rear and XZA3 on the front.

The old were XDN2, pretty sure...they made the truck wiggle and jiggle, and started to throw rubber. I will have to look for the model of the new ones, I don't remember.

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I had the exact same situation myself. Last time I got a new set of drive tires it felt like I was driving on ice at first. By the time i'd made one trip it was unnoticable.

We ran the old tires for probably six months, ride never improved. Then the tires started to throw rubber. The new ones seem to be a huge improvement.

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The old were XDN2, pretty sure...they made the truck wiggle and jiggle, and started to throw rubber. I will have to look for the model of the new ones, I don't remember.

Maybe that is why my MH bounces. :unsure:

Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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You need Rob to sit on your fifth wheel plate to make it ride smooth! :loldude:

He only has a single axle. I'm afraid he'd rut the pavement, and wear tires out real quick. Not to mention dealing with the cops for being overweight!!

I smell sombody pickin on me again.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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He only has a single axle. I'm afraid he'd rut the pavement, and wear tires out real quick. Not to mention dealing with the cops for being overweight!!

I smell sombody pickin on me again.

Rob

I am not getting in the middle of this one. (But a little extra weight might help!) :rolleyes:

Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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