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JoeH

Easy day at the country club.

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2 hours ago, JoeH said:

1995 RD688S

 

KIMG0332~2.JPG

I’ve never seen any concrete distributed this way; is this like a plant on wheels? 

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it is a metered delivery truck. can mix what you need on the job. from 1 wheelbarrow full, to the whole truck load. 

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Pretty neat setup. We have a guy here local whom can mix down 1/8 yard precisely. It is mounted onto a F-550 Ford chassis and he custom casts small items in place such as concrete pillars, goldfish ponds, birdbaths, etc. right off the truck. I've done some buildup and repair to his prior apparatus but this one is only about two years old. Neat thing about his setup is he "washes out" afterward into a self contained tank leaving no trace on a customer's property. Never seen anything like that prior.   

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This truck has 18,600 hours on it, not all of them by us. Truck has about 250,000 miles, we got it around 215,000 or so.

Our trucks meter concrete to the nearest 1/10th of a yard, this one packed out full will do 10 yards, weighing in at roughly 73,280, PA's max triaxle weight.

This particular mixer is a 1975 Daffin Concrete Mobile. We renovated it from a 7 yarder to a 10 yarder and have had it on the road for nearly 5 years now. Daffin no longer exists, but some of their mixers are still sneaking around, we have 3 of them. One of Daffin's dealers, CemenTech, ultimately wound up buying Daffin Concrete Mobile rights, and today they are a major Volumetric Concrete Mixer manufacturer.

Sand, stone, cement, water all kept separate. There are 2 tanks on the passenger side for calcium chloride (accelerant) and air entrainment. It's a "ribbon feed" manufacturing unit, basically meaning it siphons materials continuously. Materials drop off a conveyor that runs above the truck frame into the auger you can see sticking out the back of the truck. Three 4' chutes can be hung off the auger for a total reach of 18' 6" (on level ground) from the back center of the truck. Can start and stop at any point, and the auger will have anywhere from 1-2  wheelbarrows in it depending on auger mix angle. If customer gives me a heads up when we are almost done the pour I can usually time it so I only leave a 5 gallon bucket or less of washout. 

This truck mixes slow at a rate of about 15-17 yards per hour, CemenTech makes a mixer that will put out 90 yards per hour! That's a little fast for us, a lot of our customers use wheelbarrows. A barrow would be full in about 2 or 3 seconds, and would probably get knocked over in the process.

These trucks can be used in remote locations and can mix concrete non stop as long as you can keep feeding materials in.  You could literally mix concrete 24/7 without having to stop the truck. Some structures like silos and water towers get poured continuously with Slip Forms So there are no cold seams.  Being only 15 miles from the edge of Philadelphia, I've never been anywhere remote with our trucks. We also don't bid on jobs, we're C.O.D. Which means nobody owes us money, and we pay our bills.

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3 hours ago, j hancock said:

Golf can be fun!

Sexy golfer.jpg

I think I might take up golfing

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