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Wonder if I will be up for restoration at 1,003,109 miles like my B-30?


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Lady at the MTO office wanted to know mileage on my B-30 when I went to transfer ownership latest week. 3,109 miles I says. She says, "And you paid only $1,200?". "Yep", says I, "but I think you have to add a million to that number". She tells me I need an appraisal. Got the appraisal and went back to MTO and tells the lady I think I got ripped off. It only appraised at $1,000. She charged tax on the amount I told her in the first place.

Wonder if I will still be a candidate for restoration at a million miles?

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Best regards, Dennis

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pretty hard to believe any small gas job B model could have more than 150,000 on them period. the small flathead gas engines were only good for about 80,000 before a rebuild and that's if you babied them. that's the reason why the sheet metal is usually so good on them. the diesels I have seen a few 61's with over 2 million miles on them. think mine had 1,400,000 on it actually . she should have given you a break. like they said, they got their money the first time around

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pretty hard to believe any small gas job B model could have more than 150,000 on them period. the small flathead gas engines were only good for about 80,000 before a rebuild and that's if you babied them. that's the reason why the sheet metal is usually so good on them. the diesels I have seen a few 61's with over 2 million miles on them. think mine had 1,400,000 on it actually . she should have given you a break. like they said, they got their money the first time around

I have to wonder about the 1,003,109 myself. I can say that the previous owner would have looked after it like it was one of the kids so whatever it would have been good for, he would have got it. I don't if I would call it babying though given the 2000 Imperial gallon tanks he had on it.

Based on a vague knowledge of dairy farms and potential route lengths around here, a milk tanker in 1960 would have had to travel at least 50 miles per day for five or six days a week the year 'round. Even at that rate, the odometer would had to have failed within in three months of new, which doesn't make much sense either.

Based on typical B-30s, that engine should have gone through at least five rebuilds to rack up over a million miles. Maybe I should mention the mileage in my request to the Mack Museum.

On the taxes, it is actually a quality tax when applied to hardware. The more quality a manufacturer builds in, the more the hardware will be passed and the more tax that is collected thereby penalizing a manufacturer for building quality. We don't like to encourage too much good stuff up here in Canada.

While I am on the stupid things we do up here, some bunch of jackasses ( I think it might have been the police) started television commercials telling motorists that they have to pull over and stop when an emergency vehicle approaches with lights flashing when the law requires one to make way. In other words, one must get the f.... out the way. Now we have motorists pulling over and stopping in the emergency lanes on freeways, which they think are shoulders, in traffic jams. That crap came close to costing me my life back in 2007.

Edited by dmlinton

Best regards, Dennis

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Appraisal cost $20 so not bad. Was just thinking about the pic I posted of a restored one down in Niagara Region, Ontario. Owner is asking $50,000. Tax would be $6,500 on top of that.

I actually bought my truck for about $50 less than scrap (assuming she at least 10,000 lb with old dump body) so gov lost out on $6.50 of tax. The previous owner really wants to see the old truck restored - had the whole family - wife, son, daughter-in-law, grandkids and some people from down the road - out to take pics, watch it loaded and bid farewell. The PO has a lot of trouble walking but his mind still sharp. I hope to have the restoration well underway, maybe even finished, while he can still do an inspection.

I think it is great that you are thinking about the previous owner when you are doing your restoration. Imagine how happy he will be to see his old girl on the road again.

Some of us get pretty attached to our trucks, when you spend a lot of time in them, you can't help but get attached. So when you see it heading down the road , you hope its to a better place, not the scrap yard.

Looks to me, that B30 has a great new home!

Thanks for sharing your restoration with us.

Keith

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Keith 

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Just remember if there's no pictures it didn't happen

I will take lots of pics. I am planning on making a video of the engine turning first time and, hopefully, starting in four years. Should happen this week. Going to use my JD MT with a flat belt off the pulley to a rear truck tire for a starter kuzz the truck starter needs repair. It will sort of be like bump starting with out the truck moving. There is only me, myself and I so between the tree of us, there will be just enough to operate the truck and tractor. Of course there is likely to be an audience. That has been known to happen when the neighbours notice me up to another weird scheme.

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Best regards, Dennis

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the MT looks like she is still in her original work cloths, we had a M in the 50's here on the ranch they traded it for a 40 before I came along, nice to see one that is still used and not rotting into the ground! our 40 went through a fire and got repowered with a M engine, a friend of mine has it now to play with, when he's done tractor showing i'll get her back.

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the MT looks like she is still in her original work cloths, we had a M in the 50's here on the ranch they traded it for a 40 before I came along, nice to see one that is still used and not rotting into the ground! our 40 went through a fire and got repowered with a M engine, a friend of mine has it now to play with, when he's done tractor showing i'll get her back.

It has actually been painted and decals added. If you look close, "John Deere" is a decal instead of the original hand painted script. Otherwise, the tractor is pretty well original - I put a carburetor kit and muffler on it this weekend.

The Ms are neat old tractors. Bought another one today with two furrow plow, scuffler and dozer.

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Edited by dmlinton

Best regards, Dennis

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Not so sure you will be able to use a belt to start it as with both wheels off the ground it would most likely just spin not turning the drive train, but I could be wrong, make sure to film it I would like to see that.

I will jack only one wheel off the ground and securely chock all the rest. The diff should favour the easy to turn wheel ... hope she doesn't have some sort of limited slip diff but will find out when I put the M pulley in gear. I will probably have to do some serious "ground speed" guessing and double clutching to get the truck into gear but the "starter" will only be idling - rather stall the tractor while figuring things out than something more serious. Doubt I need a 17 HP starter anyhow so tractor at idle should be more than enough.

Edited by dmlinton

Best regards, Dennis

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Normally a milk truck would run 7 days a week, 365 a year - thinking it was milk pick up - not delivery. 50 miles a day is probably below average. They usually had to hit a lot of farms to get a load back then. Does the odometer have a 100,000 mile digit?

Wouldn't it be better just to fix the starter? It will have to be done anyway.

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Normally a milk truck would run 7 days a week, 365 a year - thinking it was milk pick up - not delivery. 50 miles a day is probably below average. They usually had to hit a lot of farms to get a load back then. Does the odometer have a 100,000 mile digit?

Wouldn't it be better just to fix the starter? It will have to be done anyway.

The guy that owned the truck also drove it so 7 days a week would have been unlikely given that he also had his own dairy farm to run. Milk pickup was every second day around these parts starting in the late sixties so unless the guy had contracted for two routes, 3 - 4 days per week would have been the norm. Every other farm, sometimes more, were dairy farms here back in those days. However, the first 10 years of operation the truck belonged to a fleet operator so 364 days per year could be realistic. Last 12 years of milk pickup (1970 - 1981, inclusive) would be the PO's operating schedule.

Nevertheless, even if the truck did run 364 days per year (they never ran on Christmas Day) for 22 years, the odometer reading still does not seem to make sense.

The odometer is a six digit one, i.e., 999999 is max value it could display.

Best regards, Dennis

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