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Receiver hitch fabrication recommendation in NJ


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Does anyone know of a good shop in NJ who can fab up a 2" receiver hitch for my General? I maybe jumping the gun since I still have to get I road worthy but I would like to be able to pull my shops 2 car open and 2 car enclosed trailers that are bumper pull. Plus I may be able to get some side work moving RV trailers for the place across from me.

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  • 2 weeks later...

1/2" thick plate steel, notch out for frame rails, slide plate on and weld to the frame. I also like to bolt a piece of 1/4" 2x3 or 3x3 angle iron to the plate and thru the frame sides.

you can get a 2" receiver at tractor supply, mark out the size and cut a square hole in plate, slide in the receiver and weld it in place, front and back. I also welded a 1' piece of 2x2 square stock on top of the receiver and welded it to the plate for extra strength in case I had something real heavy on.

If you drop the plate real low beneath the frame, weld a piece of 1/8" or 1/4" 2x2 angle iron to the plate and run up the outside of the frame rail and bolt it there, This will add more lateral support.

We've installed a few of these this way and have never had a problem pulling excavators and dozers. I've had a 10k mini on the trailer and hooked to my dually and the hitch worked fine.

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Does anyone know of a good shop in NJ who can fab up a 2" receiver hitch for my General? I maybe jumping the gun since I still have to get I road worthy but I would like to be able to pull my shops 2 car open and 2 car enclosed trailers that are bumper pull. Plus I may be able to get some side work moving RV trailers for the place across from me.

Call any Car or truck dealer and they will tell you, or better yet try the Pete dealer over at ex 16 by Great Adv. some one does put there bodies and stuff on there new trucks

BULLHUSK

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Does anyone know of a good shop in NJ who can fab up a 2" receiver hitch for my General? I maybe jumping the gun since I still have to get I road worthy but I would like to be able to pull my shops 2 car open and 2 car enclosed trailers that are bumper pull. Plus I may be able to get some side work moving RV trailers for the place across from me.

How are you registering the truck? If you do it as a hobby truck and get nailed for commercial work. It is going to turn into a headache you will not soon forget

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Can you weld? Most farm supply stores sell 2" receiver tubes in varying lengths. I torched a square hole out of my rear cross member and welded in one of those tubes....then reinforced that with some angle iron. Bolted in a pair of 10,000 pound rated D-rings and then welded them in place as well. It's a LITTLE higher than I would have liked, but it works. I had wanted to weld the receiver tube on to the underside of the rear cross member, but that would have been more involved because it would have required modifications to the light bar.

Some pics:

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When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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BTW, that's an 8" drop hitch...really needs more drop, but that's all that's available off-the-shelf around here. Anything bigger and I'd either have to special order it or make it myself. Would have been better if the hitch was under the rear cross member instead of in it....and I should have used a 2.5" receiver tube instead of the 2" for better weight ratings. They sell an adapter so that you can use 2" hitch in the 2.5" receiver, or just use a 2.5" hitch to take advantage of the increased weight ratings....less likely to bend/break if you use it as an anchor point to either get pulled out or to pull somebody else out of a sticky situation.

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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I talked to a welder who said he can custom fab something for me. The idea i have is to do a whole tail piece with a hitch on the lower end, a pintle above that and new lights up top. Also going to mount in a 7 pin connector for trailers and an electric brake controller.

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I talked to a welder who said he can custom fab something for me. The idea i have is to do a whole tail piece with a hitch on the lower end, a pintle above that and new lights up top. Also going to mount in a 7 pin connector for trailers and an electric brake controller.

Like th above response. 1/2 INCH plate for the main part and you can have everything mounted on that.

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I just used a 6-pin, but only 4 are wired up because that's all I needed for the tow lights on the back of the beater truck. I spliced into the wiring for the Left & Right turn/stop lights and the tail lights right there at the back of the tractor, and grounded it directly to the frame. The reverse can be spliced in there, too. They make an electric brake controller that plumbs into the air line rather than the electricals...although you can still splice the more commonly available units off the rack into the brake light wiring by the pedals and then run the blue wire back for that. Aux circuit would have to be run from a power source...usually on a keyed circuit so that when the key is on it is powered, but no power when key is off to avoid draining the vehicle's battery.

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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Most of my bumper pull trailers are 7 pin so it make sense to install one of those. Plus the 3 car wedge trailers are 7 pin and electric brakes. I am not the best welder so something like this, I would have a professional do. 1/2 plate steel sounds right. This of course will not be immediate but once I get everything else worked out squared away with the truck, then I will start to plan the additions. Thanks as always for the advice.

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Heck, I didn't know how to weld either until I bought a welder and started playing around with it a bit. For what it'll cost to have somebody else do the work for you, you can buy a welder and learn to use it....then the next project that comes up, you'll be ready to go instead of needing to hire somebody else to do the work for you again. Just make sure you get one that is capable of welding the thickness you are going to be working with....and that you've got the power at your shop to run it. My wire feed calls for a 20A 110V circuit....pops the 15A breaker if I try welding too hot. My stick welder is 220V and calls for 50A, but I only have a 40A breaker. Works well for most...handles the thicker stuff better than my wire feed...but if I'm running a long bead on thicker metal, it'll still pop the breaker. The entire garage is only on 60A...so while I COULD increase the breaker size to 50A, if much else is being used in the garage at the same time (lights, etc.) I'll have a longer walk to reset the breaker at the main box in the house. Really a silly design if you ask me....200A electrical service at the house and only 60A going to the garage.

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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