Jump to content
kscarbel

When Freightliner ran Volvo in America

Recommended Posts

So it was Volvo that combined White and GMC? I thought that happened prior to the Volvo takeover.

As always, great info and pics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

God I got a ton of brochures lurking around. Don't get me started. :)

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very interesting. It is strange and a little upsetting when you realize that only two domestic truck manufacturers remain intact, PACCAR and Navistar. With VW sniffing around the door we may be at one builder before you know it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More Americans are running in the direction of getting what they want, then realizing what they have. If companies started flying flags out front identifying the country that owned them I think we would all be in for a shocking reality check!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More Americans are running in the direction of getting what they want, then realizing what they have. If companies started flying flags out front identifying the country that owned them I think we would all be in for a shocking reality check!

That is a great idea....and would be sad wake up call...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry... I missed this topic before, so I want to ask you: didn't Volvo bring the F10 and F12 (which outside of North America were known as the F88 and F89 respectively until 1977) into the U.S. market in 1982-83? They of course were the larger relatives to the F6 and F7.

~Ben

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry... I missed this topic before, so I want to ask you: didn't Volvo bring the F10 and F12 (which outside of North America were known as the F88 and F89 respectively until 1977) into the U.S. market in 1982-83? They of course were the larger relatives to the F6 and F7.

~Ben

A little confusion here. The F10 and F12 were not known outside North America as the F88 and F89.

The F88 and F89 were produced from 1965 to 1977, when they were replaced by the F10 and F12 (1977 thru 1993).

The F6 and F7 were indeed sold in the United States, imported and distributed by Freightliner Corporation. However the F10 and F12 were never sold here because Freightliner already had a heavy COE to sell.

The smaller F6 and F7 gave Freightliner a medium straight truck (24,500 to 29,000 GVW) and city/regional tractor (40,000 to 66,000 GCW) to extend their product range downward.

The one other model sold by Freightliner Corporation was the conventional cab N10 series (N1016T 4x2 and N1023T 6x4)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish VW would buy Ford. Maybe they would be reliable again.

I have traded my Ford's for VW's and my bank account thanks me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry... I missed this topic before, so I want to ask you: didn't Volvo bring the F10 and F12 (which outside of North America were known as the F88 and F89 respectively until 1977) into the U.S. market in 1982-83? They of course were the larger relatives to the F6 and F7.

~Ben

Volvo did bring a class 8 heavy to North America in 1964, feeling there was a market they tested the then prototype L4591 Titan Tiptop... not seeing a fit here they focused more within Europe and especially the UK. Within a year this truck was to morph into the very successful F88 and, repowered, the F89. The F10/12 was never imported into the US, however I have seen one many years ago here in Western Canada which I heard was a one off personal import...

BC Mack

post-10384-0-64559900-1394156093_thumb.p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little confusion here. The F10 and F12 were not known outside North America as the F88 and F89.

The F88 and F89 were produced from 1965 to 1977, when they were replaced by the F10 and F12 (1977 thru 1993).

The F6 and F7 were indeed sold in the United States, imported and distributed by Freightliner Corporation. However the F10 and F12 were never sold here because Freightliner already had a heavy COE to sell.

The smaller F6 and F7 gave Freightliner a medium straight truck (24,500 to 29,000 GVW) and city/regional tractor (40,000 to 66,000 GCW) to extend their product range downward.

The one other model sold by Freightliner Corporation was the conventional cab N10 series (N1016T 4x2 and N1023T 6x4)

But in late 1981, Freightliner came under the control of Mercedes-Benz. However, then there was the White "Road Commander" COE (and a related Autocar model), so another reason the F10/12 didn't quite show up here.

~Ben

Edited by ClassicTVMan1981X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But in late 1981, Freightliner came under the control of Mercedes-Benz. However, then there was the White "Road Commander" COE (and a related Autocar model), so another reason the F10/12 didn't quite show up here.

~Ben

Autocar never offered a high COE. The COE related to the White Road Commander 2 was branded as a Western Star (it came out in 1978 and was quite attractive).

At any rate, the F10/F12 were not suitable to the demands of the US market at that time in the heavy COE segment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At any rate, the F10/F12 were not suitable to the demands of the US market at that time in the heavy COE segment.

With respect to your vast knowledge, I can't say I can fully agree with you on this point....

I feel that.. a. the product they produced, a COE, was on a fast demise in the US due to length law changes and b. Volvo knew that to enter a market as vast as the US would stretch them too far trying to support a coast-coast dealer network demanded by buyers used to what currently existed.... especially when Volvo were already enjoying success elsewhere... that's why they bought an existing brand in GM and remodelled it...

I was on one of the first F10 maintenance courses at Ailsa Trucks, Scotland... and what I saw as the improvements over the F88 impressed me, stronger chassis, wider cab, improved engine after the TD100B... the F12 came soon after and in right hand drive which the F89 could not have...

the F12 became a very strong contender on the gold run, the Europe to Middle East run via Turkey and Iran... which was the torture test for the durability of any truck... it has evolved into the FH16 with continued success.

I feel that F10/12 would have done very well in the US.. however, there is more to this than just the technical merits of any design, the dealer support, creating new market share, financial investment in a low profit market.... I know that you know all about that..!!!!!!

The tie up with the "club cab" gave them an inside track when the French rationalised their truck industry gave them an inside track to grab Mack for a song after they had tested the waters with the GM White deal..

World trade is here to stay, shareholder return is the driving force and company loyalty has gone out the window for profit. Watch VW, Scania, MAN........ same pattern. And an American company owns DAF, so it's NOT all one way traffic in the mergers and aquisitions game..!!!

BC Mack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More Americans are running in the direction of getting what they want, then realizing what they have. If companies started flying flags out front identifying the country that owned them I think we would all be in for a shocking reality check!

MAN you got that right!! I keep checkin the Whitehouse on line just ta make sure Old Glory still flies with pride there!! Ya just never know what the guy that lives there might do! If it aint broke, he'll break it!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With respect to your vast knowledge, I can't say I can fully agree with you on this point....

I feel that.. a. the product they produced, a COE, was on a fast demise in the US due to length law changes and b. Volvo knew that to enter a market as vast as the US would stretch them too far trying to support a coast-coast dealer network demanded by buyers used to what currently existed.... especially when Volvo were already enjoying success elsewhere... that's why they bought an existing brand in GM and remodelled it...

I was on one of the first F10 maintenance courses at Ailsa Trucks, Scotland... and what I saw as the improvements over the F88 impressed me, stronger chassis, wider cab, improved engine after the TD100B... the F12 came soon after and in right hand drive which the F89 could not have...

the F12 became a very strong contender on the gold run, the Europe to Middle East run via Turkey and Iran... which was the torture test for the durability of any truck... it has evolved into the FH16 with continued success.

I feel that F10/12 would have done very well in the US.. however, there is more to this than just the technical merits of any design, the dealer support, creating new market share, financial investment in a low profit market.... I know that you know all about that..!!!!!!

The tie up with the "club cab" gave them an inside track when the French rationalised their truck industry gave them an inside track to grab Mack for a song after they had tested the waters with the GM White deal..

World trade is here to stay, shareholder return is the driving force and company loyalty has gone out the window for profit. Watch VW, Scania, MAN........ same pattern. And an American company owns DAF, so it's NOT all one way traffic in the mergers and aquisitions game..!!!

BC Mack

That company is, of course, PACCAR, which owns Peterbilt and Kenworth. It also took over the British truck builder Foden when it went bankrupt in 1980. Ironically, for a short period of time, production of the Ford Transcontinental moved from Holland to the former Foden plant in Sandbach, England.

~Ben

Edited by ClassicTVMan1981X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am wondering if the F12 and F16 would've been likely competitors to the domestic class 8 COE segment that included the White Road Commander, the Freightliner COE, the Kenworth K100/Peterbilt 352/362, GMC Astro 9500 and the Ford Louisville CL(T)9000?

~Ben

Edited by ClassicTVMan1981X

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Volvo did bring a class 8 heavy to North America in 1964, feeling there was a market they tested the then prototype L4591 Titan Tiptop... not seeing a fit here they focused more within Europe and especially the UK. Within a year this truck was to morph into the very successful F88 and, repowered, the F89. The F10/12 was never imported into the US, however I have seen one many years ago here in Western Canada which I heard was a one off personal import...

BC Mack

That looks like a cross between a White 5000 and a GMC Crackerbox. We shoulda seen it coming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...