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What's everyones oppinion on the new Mack rear ends? Can the interwheel power dividers work as effectively as the Merritor/Eaton with 4 way locks in a vocational application? I ran many years with the R Model in my avatar and never had a problem with traction or reliability, but can't figure out why most Mack dealers try to steer me clear of Mack transmissions and rears?

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Mack has just introduced their first driver controlled locking differential. The new series will be called 150/151 series, and production will begin in the first half of 2010. 92/93 series and 112/113 series will be phased out.

At the last dealer meeting, dealers were encouraged to sell more Mack components.

Should be interesting to see how that goes.

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I wonder if the carriers will fit into existing housings and if they will be available for replacement of existing units through ReMack, or parts channels?

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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For dump trucks and off-road the Mack rear-ends are the way to go. On road or over the road the Mack rear ends are way to heavy. I love the Mack rear-ends more than any other but when we spec out trucks and the customer see the weight difference the usually go with the Eatons or Rockwell/Meitors. And Mack wont let any HP bigger than 427 with the 93/93 carriers, if the customer wants bigger HP they must use 200 series Mack or vendor carriers/axles. The 200 series are even heavier and more $$$. I was doing a HP conversion on a 2003 CH613 355/380 HP going up to a 460HP and Mack didnt want to turn on the download because the truck had 92/93 carriers/axles. If the new Mack carriers are as light as the vendor carriers it will be a big hit. I hate doing the warranty on vendor carriers, Mack warranty is much easier to deal with.

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I've been in a few situations where the interwheel locks would have maybe prevented my having to dig out the chain and get pulled out. The Mack rears will only do so much for ya...work GREAT as long as I am moving, but once I stop (to load/unload/figure out where I need to go)... :pat:

What would make it better, though, if it were set up on a pair of switches...like a freighshaker I drove as a company driver. One controlled the power divider, the other locked the center differentials. That way, if you were just needing a little extra traction to keep you moving (and you still needed to be able to steer) you could just engage the power divider....but if it was really bad and you just needed to get moving, you could lock it all in and go straight.

I like the idea of stronger axles...but are they :mack1: axles? Or are they V*lv* axles with a :mack1: stamp on 'em? :idunno:

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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I was waiting for someone to point out tha Mack hasnt built their own axles in a long time, they do have a rep at the factory to make sure they get what they want but they done make them. I notidced the post about the axle locks being handy some times but the old air shift is a good strong rear and guess what if your rear brakes are all 30-30's and they are adjusted even, when you get into a sticky situation you can flip in the power divider (which you should have done before you drove into soft ground to begin with) then set the parking brakes put the truck into the lowest gear possible and ease into it if the truck runs like all the Makc dump trucks I have driven it will pull right out. The brakes being set causes the power to go to all of the wheels fairly evenly the way those diffs work they put the power to the axle that can turn the easiest, so by setting the brakes they become a quasi axle lock. I will say this is not covered under warranty and is not advised by techs or dealers but I bewt I have used that trick a thousand times and it works. I do love a Mack rear they are heavy as crap but they hold up where others dont, I worked for a company with one Mack and three petes and two kw's for a while all dump trucks. The paccars with 46,000 eaton rears and the Mack with 44,000 camelbacks with 90series diffs the eatons would break axles left and right in soft ground you didnt even have to try hard but the Mack never broke a one in 200,000 hard miles on construction sites. Ryan

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[

I like the idea of stronger axles...but are they :mack1: axles? Or are they V*lv* axles with a :mack1: stamp on 'em? :idunno:

vulva I doubt it but would not be shocked if Meritor built them

I think Meritor makes Volvo's axles as well. Meritor makes drive line components for just about every auto maker out there be it car or truck.

-Thad

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