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EM6-300L flywheel housing replacement


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We have a RD690S with an EM6-300L that has a cracked flywheel housing.  Found a good used replacement, 2 questions.  When I pulled the old one off there was no gasket between the block and flywheel housing, just some RTV.  It's been off before, apparently someone tried to weld the cracks in the past.  Does a gasket exist, or just use RTV or some other sealant?  Our Mack parts guy hasn't been too helpful on this old truck.  Also, since this isn't the original flywheel housing that came with this engine, do the dowel pin holes need to be reamed and oversized pins installed, or if the fit is tight just roll with it?  Thanks for any advice.

Edited by dieselfuelonly
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  • dieselfuelonly changed the title to EM6-300L flywheel housing replacement

Dunno about a gasket but I wouldn't of thought there would be one

The dowls I would imagine would be all machined to a precise measurements in the factory and should be interchangeable 

Thats my thoughts 

 

Paul 

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OK..... The sealant is Mack Gray! also, that fly wheel housing may need to have "Runout" checked.... put the housing up dry to check and set run-out... if needed on this engine. I have done this only a few times many years ago... I hope "F", and Glenn chime in. There is others that can tell you as well.... jojo

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16 minutes ago, Rob said:

The only one of these I've ever seen out of spec was a Maxidyne engine rebuild with a later aluminum flywheel housing incorporated. The fasteners retaining the flywheel housing to the block were not used with a thread locker and given the thermal expansion differences between aluminum and cast iron, they worked loose. In fact the flywheel housing being softer than the dowel pins was destroyed. A replacement cast iron flywheel housing was slipped onto new dowel pins and it was within circular runout tolerance upon reassembly and never another problem. This was a Fuller transmission install and owner operator end dump truck application.

Never was a fan of aluminum flywheel housings myself except on maybe a two stroke Detroit engine which did not have the "off idle" torque rise of others. There is a lot of torque absorbed through the flywheel and clutch housing upon acceleration and the fasteners need to remain tight to absorb it.  

I'm with you, seems like with all the stress between engine and transmission an iron housing would be best.

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I forgot to ask about a separate rear main housing. just curious. still need to do the runout check for the alignment of the clutch and tranny... I'm glad the others posted on this topic.. jojo

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