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Romania is plowing snow with Ford trucks


kscarbel2
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7 hours ago, RoadwayR said:

Otosan will probably go after the Venezuelan market next.  Of course they will have to lend them money to buy the trucks.......... 

 

No they can get that same model I believe from Brazil.  And as for the money?  No problem-Maduro will put it on his Cuba-Visa card-if he isn't living in Cuba before long!

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12 minutes ago, Red Horse said:

No they can get that same model I believe from Brazil.  And as for the money?  No problem-Maduro will put it on his Cuba-Visa card-if he isn't living in Cuba before long!

No, the 3542D is exclusively a Ford-Otosan model Bob.

http://www.fordtrucks.com.gh/Content/Resources/Vehicle/3542D.pdf

https://www.fordcaminhoes.com.br/content/ford-brazil-trucks/pt-br/cargo.html

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As long as the front axle assembly has the capacity to handle a plow, no problem. MN DOT had some tandem MR dump trucks with plows assigned to the Minneapolis-St.Paul metro area, I suspect the better visibility was an advantage in the cities. Following similar logic, NYC has informed the truck makers that it wants better visibility in it's future truck purchases and they may switch to cabovers.

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Back around 2007 when the U.S. Postal Service was damn near giving away their used MR tandem tractors with the Allison autos I was tempted to build something like those Scanias- Stretch the frame in back and add a steerable tag axle to up the legal GVW from 46K to 54K pounds, would have made a great dump/plow truck for urban applications.

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On 1/28/2019 at 10:57 PM, kscarbel2 said:

OK Kevin thx- I was thinking of the 3133-but I see clearly a different animal. In any case, I think many of those Brazilian Cargos would do well here to compete with the Chevy-badged Isuzus.

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19 hours ago, Maxidyne said:

As long as the front axle assembly has the capacity to handle a plow, no problem. MN DOT had some tandem MR dump trucks with plows assigned to the Minneapolis-St.Paul metro area, I suspect the better visibility was an advantage in the cities. Following similar logic, NYC has informed the truck makers that it wants better visibility in it's future truck purchases and they may switch to cabovers.

Agree-IMO front axle rating is key.  Other factor though would be just how do you mount the head gear on a cabover?  it is one thing to have lift up access panels on a fiberglass hood-quite another to accommodate a heavy system that can handle say a 10+ ft reversible plow and still be able to tilt the cab.

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19 hours ago, Maxidyne said:

As long as the front axle assembly has the capacity to handle a plow, no problem. MN DOT had some tandem MR dump trucks with plows assigned to the Minneapolis-St.Paul metro area, I suspect the better visibility was an advantage in the cities. Following similar logic, NYC has informed the truck makers that it wants better visibility in it's future truck purchases and they may switch to cabovers.

NYC is following London on visibility requirements.

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Kscarbel  I did not say a COE could not handle a plow, I said that most trucks I see are axle forward. That COE is not set up like DOT trucks I see here. It has no under body scraper or spreader body. I think a axle forward truck can carry a heavy plow and a heavy loaded spreader body better. A Mack MR makes a great city plow truck , but I do not think it would be good highway plow - spreader truck.  I do not know how to set up a truck for plowing, but I think a over loaded front axle can make a truck hard to handle at speed. A truck that left a yard loaded with salt or sand will drive good with the plow up or down. But if plowing and spreading as many do, when un loaded  and plow up going back for more salt, I would want a truck that is not hard too handle. May be some BMT member who drive large DOT trucks will comment on this.

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9 hours ago, Red Horse said:

Any clue what that box like structure is hanging off front end? Impressive shop in that first picture.  

Bob, if I remember correctly, that covers the hitch while the plow is removed for the summer months. It's functional from a safety standpoint, and aesthetically appealing. 

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18 hours ago, TS7 said:

Kscarbel  I did not say a COE could not handle a plow, I said that most trucks I see are axle forward. That COE is not set up like DOT trucks I see here. It has no under body scraper or spreader body. I think a axle forward truck can carry a heavy plow and a heavy loaded spreader body better. A Mack MR makes a great city plow truck , but I do not think it would be good highway plow - spreader truck.  I do not know how to set up a truck for plowing, but I think a over loaded front axle can make a truck hard to handle at speed. A truck that left a yard loaded with salt or sand will drive good with the plow up or down. But if plowing and spreading as many do, when un loaded  and plow up going back for more salt, I would want a truck that is not hard too handle. May be some BMT member who drive large DOT trucks will comment on this.

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Kscarbel I think large brooms are used on runways to clean pavement bare after plowing because they cannot use salt. A broom is not very good on hard packed snow, runways do not have that issue. The only way to clear hardpacked snow to bare pavement is a steel edge plow. You need down force on hardpacked snow. We plow a large parking lot with a Cat 950G loader with a 16' pusher box. The rubber edge needs to be adjusted about every 10-12 hours of use. Its takes more than one pass to clean the pavement bare. I think a heavy steel edge plow or underbody scraper are the best way clear a road fast. I used to work for a road builder that was on call for a county road commission and ran a Cat 12G grader with a 14' blade,  cleared a lot side roads after a heavy snow with that.   

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29 minutes ago, TS7 said:

Kscarbel I think large brooms are used on runways to clean pavement bare after plowing because they cannot use salt. A broom is not very good on hard packed snow, runways do not have that issue. The only way to clear hardpacked snow to bare pavement is a steel edge plow. You need down force on hardpacked snow. We plow a large parking lot with a Cat 950G loader with a 16' pusher box. The rubber edge needs to be adjusted about every 10-12 hours of use. Its takes more than one pass to clean the pavement bare. I think a heavy steel edge plow or underbody scraper are the best way clear a road fast. I used to work for a road builder that was on call for a county road commission and ran a Cat 12G grader with a 14' blade,  cleared a lot side roads after a heavy snow with that.   

I hear you. The great thing about brooms is they are far less destructive, and more forgiving.

And obviously, snow-type rotary brooms clear the road surface more completely of snow and ice.

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