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dek1581

removing engine

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what would be the SAFEST way of removing an engine, particularly from a mack c or cf model?

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Wise ass answer; let someone else do it. 

You need to remove the roof panel and clear all of the accessories out of the way; radiator, fuel lines, etc. Most shops use an overhead crane, but any machine capable of lifting the engine weight and able to lift high enough to clear the cab would work. 

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yeah I have researched gantry cranes, forklifts, even bobcats and I wanted to know if anyone ever tried a 3 ton engine hoist or would it not be able to lift high enough...

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1 hour ago, dek1581 said:

yeah I have researched gantry cranes, forklifts, even bobcats and I wanted to know if anyone ever tried a 3 ton engine hoist or would it not be able to lift high enough...

won't go high enough. You need almost 7 foot clearance. that means you need a 12 lift ability. Backhoe, excavator,...... Hey, even a grapple truck

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If you have the ability to move the vehicle outside prior to removal, and back into the space without power, you may want to consider contacting a tow service that has the ability to telescope their boom out and pick it that way. I removed the 707 gas engine in my B model with a forklift, and that engine was 2000lbs. A diesel will be heavier, and you will want to make sure you have something to place the engine on once it is removed.  

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I have seen engines for sale. it appears that they are resting on the oil pan. is it in illusion, or are the oil pans that thick that they can handle the weight without warping?

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I would be concerned about the oil plug being pushed into the pan. Yes I have seen them on the pan and usually there is damage.

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After thinking a bit about this my question is why are you removing the engine? If it is to replace it or re-build it than care is needed. If you are doing it to salvage the engine than just cutting it up would be easier.

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repowering from gas to diesel...

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Most of the inline six Mack diesel engines I've pulled are right at 1950-2000# when near fully dressed. Pulling from a CF is going to be a challenge without an overhead hoist to not bang anything up during the extraction or install. I use a Gantry Crane with about 14' under hook height. The gantry is about 18' in width so an engine is picked, slid over, then set on a pallet, cradle, or truck bed for the next operation(s). I suppose a forklift with a side shift mast would work also but I've never done it this way. 

I assume you are pulling an EN-707 series engine. If going to a diesel there are a few to avoid in the application like just about any END-711 if staying with Mack. Assuming you want to stay with a Mack engine a good selection would be near any early 70's ENDT-675, ENDT-676, or most any E6 series of the early 80's. If you plan to incorporate air to air CAC, you have a lot more options for power upgrades. Regardless, step up the cooling capacity as you really need to get the heat out of the heads and a heavy multi row radiator core is the way to do it best. Airflow is somewhat impeded in that chassis design so could use help, (IMO).  

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On 12.01.2017 at 7:58 PM, dek1581 said:

I have seen engines for sale. it appears that they are resting on the oil pan. is it in illusion, or are the oil pans that thick that they can handle the weight without warping?

I have done it such way, onto the concrete floor.

Got a small oil leak after that and had to hit the pan back in shape during the engine rebuild. 

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repowering from gas to diese

I'll play the devil's advocate; Why? If it is a "C" model it will be hard to find a diesel, but if it is a CF it will be easier and cheaper to find a diesel rather than attempt to re-power a gasser.

Even if the truck is a favorite from your past I'd clone a diesel rather than go to the expense and trouble of a re-power.

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Another suggestion for an "engine cradle" is old tires, they spread out the weight some and protect the oil pan..

PICT0140.JPGPICT0139.JPG

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On ‎1‎/‎13‎/‎2017 at 0:27 PM, Rob said:

Most of the inline six Mack diesel engines I've pulled are right at 1950-2000# when near fully dressed. Pulling from a CF is going to be a challenge without an overhead hoist to not bang anything up during the extraction or install. I use a Gantry Crane with about 14' under hook height. The gantry is about 18' in width so an engine is picked, slid over, then set on a pallet, cradle, or truck bed for the next operation(s). I suppose a forklift with a side shift mast would work also but I've never done it this way. 

I assume you are pulling an EN-707 series engine. If going to a diesel there are a few to avoid in the application like just about any END-711 if staying with Mack. Assuming you want to stay with a Mack engine a good selection would be near any early 70's ENDT-675, ENDT-676, or most any E6 series of the early 80's. If you plan to incorporate air to air CAC, you have a lot more options for power upgrades. Regardless, step up the cooling capacity as you really need to get the heat out of the heads and a heavy multi row radiator core is the way to do it best. Airflow is somewhat impeded in that chassis design so could use help, (IMO).  

thanks for the info!

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