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Trump and Immigration (Illegal Immigrants in the US)

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23 hours ago, Mack Technician said:

Questions is why are these politicians walking out of closed door meetings and flapping their wings like a buncha wet hens then cherry picking portions of a conversation to create media flurry. They have used the impeachment card so much on Trump it is becoming laughable. 

 Two of the reporters who "broke" the story  said that Durban's text to them about a new " Trump scandal"" "peaked their interest.

Now here is my question, if DACA, border protection and Immigration are fixed what do the Democrats have to run on? All though maybe the media will blame a government shut down on the actions of Trump?

Also Bill Clinton in his second term wanted chain migration ended and immigratipon reform so  immigrants coming here had to have  usable skills or education to contribute to our country,  Isn't that what on the table now?

Maybe they should look at some of their boy LBJ's comments on voter groups and civil rights. So many bleeps is sounds like the button stuck.

 

Edited by 41chevy

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CBS/AP January 13, 2018, 11:36 PM

New details in police chase of Greyhound bus with 40 people on board

  • WADSWORTH, Ill. -- Reports of a man armed with a gun and threatening to kill fellow passengers on a Greyhound bus led to a police chase of the vehicle that started in Wisconsin and ended in northern Illinois.  A 33-year-old man previously deported from the United States faces felony charges, CBS Chicago reports

None of the 40 people aboard the bus bound for Chicago from Milwaukee on Friday night was injured and the suspect was taken into custody after authorities, using spike strips to flatten the tires of the bus, forced the vehicle to stop on Interstate 94 near the Illinois community of Wadsworth. Authorities said they began chasing the bus after getting a call from someone who was on board.

Margarito Vargas-Rosas, who most recently resided in Chicago, is the suspect who told passengers he had a gun and would kill people, Racine County, Wisconsin Sheriff Christopher Schmaling told reporters Saturday. Vargas-Rosas is being held at the Lake County (Ill.) jail. 

margarito-vargas-rosas-2018-1-13.jpg

  Margarito Vargas-Rosas is in custody after allegedly threatening to kill fellow passengers on a Greyhound bus pursuit and leading police on a chase. 

Racine County Wisconsin Sheriff via CBS Chicago

Police chased the bus overnight after passengers called 911. The bus came to a stop after its tires were deflated in Lake County, Illinois at I-94 and Route 173.

Vargas-Rosas was taken into custody. He works at a restaurant in Milwaukee and was returning to Chicago, Schmaling said, when he apparently got into an argument with other passengers. The suspect is an illegal immigrant who had been deported to Mexico five times, the sheriff said.

The Sheriff's Office is recommending Vargas-Rosas be charged with making terroristic threats, a felony, and disorderly conduct.

The suspect was saying "he was gonna kill us, that he was going to put a bullet in our head," passenger Patrick Todd told CBS 2 in Chicago after the nearly 40 passengers arrived at Union Station on another vehicle.

Police gave chase over the border into Illinois because the bus driver did not stop, suggesting it may have been a hijacking. Schmaling said the driver didn't know there was any potential danger.

Police put out spike strips to make the Greyhound bus stop. No firearm was recovered.

"Before I know it, there's like 20 police cars in front of us and on the side of the road," passenger Chris Walker says.

The suspect also made threats of violence against the arresting officers as well as the investigators at the police station, Schmaling said.

One passenger, Patrick Dodd, told the Chicago Tribune that the incident began when the man who said he had a gun started to threaten passengers riding in the back of the bus. Dodd said the man pulled something out of his pants that Dodd believed may have been a weapon.

Terrance Williams of New Jersey was in the middle of the bus and initially thought police were escorting the bus, not realizing what was happening in the back. But he too was confused about why it took so long for the driver to stop.

"The law is you see emergency lights you pull over," Williams said. "(The police) were in front of us, they were in back of us."

Sheriff Schmaling said the bus driver told authorities that he didn't stop the bus because he thought the squad cars were following another vehicle.  The driver was arrested also on multiple vehicular related charges.

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7 hours ago, Mack Technician said:

A cool headed carry member would have fit that situation well. 

Been better since the feds won't get to touch him in Illinois because it is a Sanctuary State, that's way Wisconsin want him extradited to them for trial.

 

Chicago HOY   August 28 2017 

(Ashlee Rezin /)
Julia EsparzaHOY

Illinois is officially a ‘sanctuary state’ for immigrants

ct-hoy-illinois-is-officially-a-sanctuary-stat-002.jpg.dcf8ee939354172abe0930b252bdcffb.jpg

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner smiles while surrounded by law enforcement officials and immigrant rights activists in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood Monday, Aug. 28, 2017, after signing legislation that will limit how local and state police can cooperate with federal immigration authorities.  AP

 
 

With mariachis performing in the background, Governor Bruce Rauner signed the TRUST Act on Monday, at a Mexican restaurant in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood, officially barring cooperation between Illinois police departments and immigration officials.

The TRUST Act, valid in all cases except where a federal judge has issued a warrant for arrest, will make Illinois more welcoming to immigrants and refugees, according to its supporters.

“We are glad Governor Rauner is doing the right thing by signing the TRUST Act, but it is important to remember that it is a result of our community’s efforts…. This is what the community needs and wants,” said Mony Ruiz-Velasco, president of the board of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (ICIRR).

The law denies local law enforcement the ability to detain people on behalf of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the federal agency charged with identifying and investigating immigrants present in the country illegally. It also prohibits local officials from inquiring about a person’s immigration status, something Ruiz-Velasco called a “very important protection,” that will make immigrants more comfortable reporting crimes to local police.

"The TRUST Act will ensure that those who live in this state of limbo [as concerns immigration status] can have one certainty: When their lives and their families are in danger, they can turn to the police without their world being taken away from them,” said Serafina Ha, of the Korean immigrant services agency, the Hana Center.

Support for the law came from Illinois law enforcement functionaries, as well as over 170 faith leaders, and over 170 Illinois employers. The Campaign for a Welcoming Illinois, in support of the bill, engaged over 84 organizations and 14,000 people in the state, according to ICIRR.

However some political leaders, including many downstate Republicans, voiced opposition.

"We are a country founded by immigrants, but those were legal immigrants, and I think the last thing Illinois wants is to see a sanctuary state, and this moves us in that direction," state Sen. Kyle McCarter, a Republican from Lebanon, Ill., told the Chicago Tribune.

Just five Republicans voted for the law in the Illinois Senate, and only one Republican voted for it in the House.

Passing with mainly Democratic support on May 5, 2017, the law had since sat on Governor Rauner’s desk as supporters organized through letters, press conferences and rallies.

“This will provide an unprecedented level of protection for Illinois’ half-million undocumented residents, who could otherwise enter the deportation pipeline through any simple interaction with police including a traffic violation,” ICIRR said in a statement. “Illinois is now the gold standard for statewide protections against deportation and federal detention of illegals"

 
 
 
 
 
Edited by 41chevy

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“This will provide an unprecedented level of protection for Illinois’ half-million" illegal immigrants, said public servant Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner.

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15 hours ago, 41chevy said:

Been better since the feds won't get to touch him in Illinois because it is a Sanctuary State, that's way Wisconsin want him extradited to them for trial.

 

Chicago HOY   August 28 2017 

(Ashlee Rezin /)
Julia EsparzaHOY

Illinois is officially a ‘sanctuary state’ for immigrants

ct-hoy-illinois-is-officially-a-sanctuary-stat-002.jpg.dcf8ee939354172abe0930b252bdcffb.jpg

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner smiles while surrounded by law enforcement officials and immigrant rights activists in Chicago's Little Village neighborhood Monday, Aug. 28, 2017, after signing legislation that will limit how local and state police can cooperate with federal immigration authorities.  AP

 
 

With mariachis performing in the background, Governor Bruce Rauner signed the TRUST Act on Monday, at a Mexican restaurant in Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood, officially barring cooperation between Illinois police departments and immigration officials.

The TRUST Act, valid in all cases except where a federal judge has issued a warrant for arrest, will make Illinois more welcoming to immigrants and refugees, according to its supporters.

“We are glad Governor Rauner is doing the right thing by signing the TRUST Act, but it is important to remember that it is a result of our community’s efforts…. This is what the community needs and wants,” said Mony Ruiz-Velasco, president of the board of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights (ICIRR).

The law denies local law enforcement the ability to detain people on behalf of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the federal agency charged with identifying and investigating immigrants present in the country illegally. It also prohibits local officials from inquiring about a person’s immigration status, something Ruiz-Velasco called a “very important protection,” that will make immigrants more comfortable reporting crimes to local police.

"The TRUST Act will ensure that those who live in this state of limbo [as concerns immigration status] can have one certainty: When their lives and their families are in danger, they can turn to the police without their world being taken away from them,” said Serafina Ha, of the Korean immigrant services agency, the Hana Center.

Support for the law came from Illinois law enforcement functionaries, as well as over 170 faith leaders, and over 170 Illinois employers. The Campaign for a Welcoming Illinois, in support of the bill, engaged over 84 organizations and 14,000 people in the state, according to ICIRR.

However some political leaders, including many downstate Republicans, voiced opposition.

"We are a country founded by immigrants, but those were legal immigrants, and I think the last thing Illinois wants is to see a sanctuary state, and this moves us in that direction," state Sen. Kyle McCarter, a Republican from Lebanon, Ill., told the Chicago Tribune.

Just five Republicans voted for the law in the Illinois Senate, and only one Republican voted for it in the House.

Passing with mainly Democratic support on May 5, 2017, the law had since sat on Governor Rauner’s desk as supporters organized through letters, press conferences and rallies.

“This will provide an unprecedented level of protection for Illinois’ half-million undocumented residents, who could otherwise enter the deportation pipeline through any simple interaction with police including a traffic violation,” ICIRR said in a statement. “Illinois is now the gold standard for statewide protections against deportation and federal detention of illegals"

 
 
 
 
 

 

Coincidently, I lost my job to an illegal immigrant from Woodstock, Illinois when I was 19 years old. Like to remind the libs I talk to that I was content working in the ginseng fields while saving for school and those were not jobs "no American would want". Wisconsin will be seeing snow-bird Mexicans coming across the South border every harvest season.   

These politicians default to the flesh and emotion. They indulge lawlessness like a Heroine addiction. Common sense and solid reasoning bounces right off the skull plate.

Kamp Dogg...........if you follow this thread you need to include the story of your car being totaled (and one side of the neighbor's house) being demolished by an illegal.

 

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New Jersey's new governor is a rabid believer in the state of New Jersey becoming a Sanctuary State for illegals also. He promises that will be one of his first jobs.

Since the Democrats now insist on Amnesty for all illegals in order for their support for funding the government. It will probably shut down. They appear to champion the illegals more than their own constituents that elected them and whom they are supposed to represent .

One democrat said the amnesty lobbyists that fund his campaign will accept nothing less. 

Edited by 41chevy

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Trump, flip-flopping, now willing to allowing the illegal immigrant children of illegal immigrant parents remain in the US and become US citizens

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Trump open to letting Dreamers ‘morph into’ citizens

Associated Press  /  January 24, 2018

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Wednesday he’s open to an immigration plan that would provide a pathway to citizenship for hundreds of thousands of young people who were brought to the country as children and are now here illegally.

“We’re going to morph into it,” Trump told reporters. “It’s going to happen, at some point in the future, over a period of 10 to 12 years.”

Trump’s pronouncements came as the White House announced it would be unveiling a legislative framework on immigration next week that it hopes can pass both the House and the Senate. The president’s remarks amounted to a preview of that framework. He said he’ll propose $25 billion for building a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border and $5 billion for other security measures.

But immediately after Trump spoke, a senior White House official stressed the idea of a pathway to citizenship so-called Dreamers was just a “discussion point” in the plan that the White House intended to preview to the House and Senate later Wednesday.

The official [your employee] spoke on condition of anonymity [why?] to preview the administration’s thinking on a contentious issue that has roiled lawmakers for months.

Despite his previously harsh rhetoric, Trump told reporters he had a message for the Dreamers: “Tell ’em not to be concerned, OK? Tell ’em not to worry. We’re going to solve the problem.” [Excuse me? The only problem is….these illegal immigrants and their equally criminal illegal immigrants parents were not caught and immediately deported.]

Trump has said repeatedly that any deal to protect those [illegal] immigrants from deportation is contingent on money for the border wall and other security measures. Trump also wants to limit the family members that immigrants are able to sponsor to join them in the U.S. and either replace or transform a visa lottery aimed at increasing diversity.

Trump has given Congress until March to come up with a plan to protect the nearly 700,000 young people [illegal immigrants] who had been protected from deportation and given the right to work legally in the country under the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. Trump announced he was ending DACA last year.

Trump expressed confidence a deal can be reached on the issue, and said he’d like to see one hammered out by the time he returns from Davos, Switzerland, on Friday.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said earlier Wednesday that the framework to be unveiled Monday “represents a compromise that members of both parties can support.”

The White House was trying to take control of the process amid criticism that the president had taken too much of a back seat during recent negotiations and had sent mixed signals that repeatedly upended near-deals.

“The president wants to lead on this issue, and that’s exactly what we’re going to do,” Sanders said.

The senior official added that the White House planned to notify Congress on Wednesday night exactly what the president’s position is, noting that that’s what many members have been asking for.

Trump had previously ruled out the idea of citizenship for the [illegal] immigrants known as Dreamers, saying last September: “We’re not looking at citizenship. We’re not looking at amnesty. We’re looking at allowing people [illegal immigrants] to stay here.”

But he said Wednesday that providing an opportunity for citizenship had its positives. “I think it’s a nice thing to have the incentive of after a period of years being able to become a citizen,” he said.

Meanwhile, on the Hill, senators from both parties were making a fresh search for their own compromise immigration legislation, though leaders conceded that the effort wouldn’t be easy and were already casting blame should it falter.

Around three dozen senators from both parties met privately Wednesday, and two top lawmakers said they’d try crafting a compromise bill based on colleagues’ suggestions. The goal is to produce consensus legislation that would be the starting point for Senate debate on immigration, which is expected to begin Feb. 8, said Sens. John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Dick Durbin, D-Ill., their parties’ No. 2 leaders.

“We’re the Senate, we have our own responsibility under the Constitution and we decided in this room to move forward,” Durbin said afterward. “If the president has some ideas he’d like to share, of course we’ll take a look at them.”

Sen. Lindsay Graham, R-S.C., said in a statement that he was “extremely pleased with the number of senators - from both sides of the aisle” — who had accepted his invitation. “My hope is that we can reach an agreement before February 8,” he said.

The senior White House officially did not know about the meeting, which was underway at the time, and said the president and Graham were not on the same page.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., has vowed not to “let those who are anti-immigrant, who call giving the Dreamers [illegal immigrants] hope ‘amnesty,’ block us. Because then we will fail, and it will be on the other side of the aisle that made that happen.”

Sanders said the White House framework is based on dozens of conversations Trump and his staff have had with members of both parties and that “it addresses all of the different things that we’ve heard from all of the various stakeholders” during the past several months.

Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., said Trump called him Wednesday morning and wants to provide “dependability for these kids [illegal immigrants],” but still expects a deal to include money for border security and his promised southern wall, to limit immigrants’ ability to sponsor family members and to end a visa lottery aimed at diversity.

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Obama's "Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals" (DACA) program allowed 690,000 illegal immigrants to stay in the country.

Now, Trump is going to outdo Obama and allow up to 1.8 million illegal immigrants remain in the country (at the end of the day, the number will certainly reach and more likely exceed 1.8 million).

This is all a "slap in the face" to all the people who go through the "legal" process of immigrating to the United States. Fools, they should have simply slipped in at night......the government won't make them leave, they can collect welfare and also send their illegal immigrant children to school. Then, they can have a US-born child to anchor the whole extended family in America.

 

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Associated Press  /  January 26, 2018

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions spoke to a crowd of law enforcement officials Friday afternoon in Norfolk, Virginia, urging changes to the nation’s immigration laws while also defending his Justice Department from recent criticism.

Sessions said his purpose every day is to get the department “back to its fundamental mission of enforcing the law and protecting the safety of Americans with integrity and fairness.”

“This mission means returning to the constitutional role of enforcing the law as it is written, not as some particular group thinks it should have been written,” he said before local and federal law enforcement officials, advocating for the elimination of political bias and favoritism “in either direction.”

“That sort of thinking is the antithesis of what the department stands for, and I won’t tolerate it.”

The speech, which was closed to the public, started shortly before 1:30 p.m. and lasted about half an hour. Media were allowed to cover the event on the 6th floor of Norfolk’s Slover Library. Sessions did not take questions afterward.

Sessions called immigration a national security issue. He stressed the need for a wall along the country’s southern border to make it harder for people to enter illegally and to “send a message to the world that in the United States of America, we enforce our laws.”

He also criticized the nation’s use of a diversity visa lottery system and “chain migration” policies that help family members of current U.S. residents join them.

“It doesn’t favor education or skills. It just favors anybody who has a relative in America – and not necessarily a close relative,” Sessions said of the current setup, one that he said defies common sense. “Employers don’t roll dice when deciding who they want to hire. Our incredible military doesn’t draw straws when deciding whom to accept. But for some reason, when we’re picking new Americans – the future of this country – our government uses a randomized lottery system and chain migration.”

Sessions said lawmakers should look at the merit-based systems “in places like Canada and Australia” and urged the government to “put in place smarter immigration laws – and start enforcing them.”

“The American people have waited long enough. It is time to end the lawlessness and create a system that serves the national interest,” he said.

Before Sessions’ speech, almost 50 people stood outside the library protesting. Most held signs with messages including “Immigrants & refugees welcome” and “Deport racists not dreamers.” [If the government administers U.S. law by deporting illegal immigrants, the government is……racist?]

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ remarks, as prepared for delivery at the Slover Library in Norfolk, Virginia on Friday, Jan. 26, 2018.

(Provided by the U.S. Department of Justice)

Thank you, Tracy for that kind introduction and for your leadership as first Assistant U.S. Attorney. Thank you for your seven years of service to this Department. You’ve done incredible work taking on child predators and national security threats and you’ve got a lot to be proud of. My good friend Dana Boente speaks very highly of you and of everyone in your office.

Above all I want to thank all of our state and local law enforcement officers who are here. This Department of Justice has your back.

We honor the work that you do. There is no task of this Department—or of this government—more important than keeping the American people safe.

And this is no easy task.

Today we face a number of serious threats—from the vicious MS-13, to the deadliest drug epidemic in American history, to radical Islamic terrorism.

Our law enforcement community is resolute and determined to confront each of these threats and to give every American safety and peace of mind.

But to do that, we need to have the right policies in place. It is neither fair nor reasonable to ask more and more of law enforcement while at the same time undermining their efforts through harmful or ineffective policies.

Our immigration policies, for example, do not promote our national interest, but instead select the vast majority of legal immigrants without any respect to merit.

As a result, law enforcement officers have had more work to do. You’ve had to go into more dangerous situations and confront more criminals—criminals who often shouldn’t have been allowed in this country in the first place.

There are some 11 million illegal aliens in this country—a population the size of Georgia or Portugal. If we can’t control—or even know—who enters this country, it’s that much harder to keep people safe.

And this is no hypothetical matter. The effects can be seen across the country.

Last week, the Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security released a report that reveals that Immigration and Customs Enforcement has removed more than 1,700 aliens with national security concerns since 9/11.

It also states that nearly three out of every four people convicted of international terrorism-related offenses in federal courts since 9/11 were born outside of this country.

That includes Mahmoud Amin Mohamed El-Hassan, a Sudanese national who lived in Woodbridge, Virginia. He was admitted to the United States in 2012 through chain migration—as a family member of a lawful permanent resident.

Now he has been sentenced to 11 years in prison for attempting to help someone fly from Richmond to Syria to fight for ISIS. He planned on following him there later.

The report goes on to talk about Ali Shukri Amin, a Sudanese national who lived in Manassas. He was admitted to the United States through chain migration as the child of a diversity visa lottery recipient, and was naturalized. He too is serving an 11-year sentence for trying to help ISIS.

According to court documents, Amin admitted to using Twitter to provide advice and encouragement to ISIS and its supporters. He also admitted that he assisted an Iranian-born friend from Prince William County to travel to Syria to join ISIS.

And as we all know, this fall we saw two terrorist attacks in New York City in less than two months that were carried out by people who came here as the result of the diversity lottery and chain migration. As a result, eight people were killed.

These cases are alarming, and should concern every American. We have no duty to allow terrorists and their sympathizers into this country. And yet we know that hundreds of them have endangered the lives of the citizens we have sworn to serve and protect.

Any crime committed by improperly vetted immigrants—and especially illegal aliens—is, by definition, preventable. Even one victim of a crime committed by an illegal alien is too many. Criminals have no right to demand entry to the United States. We should strive to never admit criminals. And yet thousands of Americans across our country have suffered because of decades of lax immigration policies and even more lax enforcement.

Last month, we released another report with the Department of Homeland Security, which revealed that there were nearly 40,000 known or suspected aliens in the custody of the Bureau of Prisons. That’s roughly one in five federal prisoners. That means that the immigrant share of the federal prison population is nearly two-thirds greater than their share of the general population.

Out of those in custody of the U.S. Marshals Service, which is responsible for housing those awaiting trial, nearly 20,000 were foreign-born. That is more than one third. And nearly triple their share of the general population.

I’m sure you’ve heard that immigrants are less likely to commit a crime than average. But one study that just came out looked at the prison population in Arizona and found that illegal aliens are more than twice as likely to be convicted of crimes as Arizonans.

They’re more likely to be convicted of sexual assault, robbery, and driving under the influence. They’re more than twice as likely to be convicted of murder.

Tens of thousands of crimes have been committed in this country that would never have happened if our immigration laws were enforced and respected like they ought to be.

Just three days ago, an illegal alien from Mexico living in Southern California was charged with rape of an intoxicated victim and first-degree burglary. He’s a driver for a ride-sharing company. He allegedly took advantage of intoxicated female passengers who got into his car. Under the laws of this country, he shouldn’t even be here.

This issue of crime committed by aliens doesn’t just affect the victims of these crimes. It affects us all by placing an unnecessary and unfair burden on our federal agents.

That’s also what happens when cities, counties, and states deliberately refuse to cooperate with federal immigration enforcement.

These so-called “sanctuary” policies force police to release criminal aliens back into the community—no matter what their crimes.

We cannot continue giving federal grants to cities that actively undermine the safety of federal law officers and intentionally frustrate efforts to reduce crime in their own cities.

That’s why, under President Trump’s leadership, we have started to channel federal law enforcement funding to cities that cooperate with immigration enforcement.

If these cities want to receive law enforcement grants, they can. They just have to stop impeding federal law enforcement.

On Wednesday, the Department requested documents from 23 jurisdictions across the country to ensure that they are complying with the law. Those that fail to respond completely or promptly will be subject to a subpoena.

I am hopeful that it will not come to that, and that these cities and counties will show us that they are following the law.

But for a permanent fix to our immigration laws, Congress needs to act.

The American people have known for more than 30 years that our immigration system is broken. It’s intentionally designed to be blind to merit.

It doesn’t favor education or skills. It just favors anybody who has a relative in America—and not necessarily a close relative. That defies common sense. Employers don’t roll dice when deciding who they want to hire. Our incredible military doesn’t draw straws when deciding whom to accept. But for some reason, when we’re picking new Americans—the future of this country—our government uses a randomized lottery system and chain migration.

President Trump ran for office and won by arguing to fix this broken system. We finally have a President who has listened to the people on this issue. He has the kind of bold agenda that the American people have been waiting for—and that we deserve.

The President is determined to finally build a wall at our Southern border. This will make it harder and more expensive for illegal aliens to break our laws and smuggle drugs or even human beings into this country. For many, it will become too costly, or too much trouble, and they will stay home.

Perhaps most importantly, the wall will send a message to the world that in the United States of America, we enforce our laws.

And to better achieve that, President Trump has proposed hiring more than 10,000 new ICE officers, 1,000 new ICE attorneys, 300 new immigration prosecutors, and nearly 400 new immigration judges. With these new resources, our immigration system will move faster and more efficiently.

But a central idea of the President’s immigration reform proposal is switching to a merit-based system of immigration.

That means welcoming the best and the brightest but banning and deporting gang members, identity fraudsters, drunk drivers, and child abusers—making them inadmissible in this country. This merit-based system would better serve our national interest because it would benefit the American people, which is what the Trump agenda is all about.

And this proposal is not unique. A merit-based system is the law in places like Canada and Australia. In those countries, future Canadians and future Australians are chosen based on their likelihood of assimilating, thriving, and contributing to society as a whole.

That kind of system would be great for our economy, of course. Much more importantly, it would be the best way to ensure that our immigration system does not continue to harm our national security. Immigration is a national security issue.

We need this agenda. And Virginians know that better than just about anybody.

It is time to put in place smarter immigration laws—and start enforcing them. The American people have waited long enough. It is time to end the lawlessness and create a system that serves the national interest.

President Trump’s proposed merit-based system would restore fairness and respect for the law to our immigration system. And it would also help keep us a lot safer.

And I want to say one last thing.

I love the Department of Justice and the great people that work there. The vast majority are dedicated, hardworking, patriotic Americans. It’s an honor to serve with them.

From day one, my mission as Attorney General has been to ensure our great Department has its rightful place as the crown jewel of the U.S. government.

However, there have been some sharp criticisms about the Department of Justice. There are two ways to address this: one way is to be defensive; the other is to hear the concerns, and act on them professionally, fairly, and completely, in order to maintain the public’s trust in their government.

My purpose every day is to get the Department back to its fundamental mission of enforcing the law and protecting the safety of Americans with integrity and fairness. That’s the first thing I think about when I wake up in the morning, and that is what my team works hard at every day.

This mission means returning to the constitutional role of enforcing the law as it is written, not as some particular group thinks it should have been written. Some people like that concept. Some people don’t. But the Constitution says that Congress writes the laws and we enforce them, not the other way around.

It means absolutely eliminating political bias or favoritism - in either direction - from our investigations and prosecutions. That sort of thinking is the antithesis of what the Department stands for, and I won’t tolerate it.

It means identifying mistakes of the past, and correcting them for the future. When we find problems, we’re addressing them head on, not sweeping them under the rug. Much of what we are doing is behind the scenes, but some of it is squarely in the public view. That’s ok. It’s part of the process.

We don’t see criticism from Congress as a bad thing. We welcome Congress as a partner in this effort. When they learn of a problem and start asking questions, that is a good thing.

Sunlight truly is the best disinfectant. Truth produces confidence.

A culture of defensiveness is not acceptable. The Department of Justice does not always know what’s best, and it is not perfect. And, it can never be that this Department conceals errors when they occur.

We expect—no, we demand—the highest level of integrity, ethics, and professionalism from every person in this Department. Everyone is expected to advance the mission of the Department honorably in service to the American people.

If anyone falls short of these high standards, we will not hesitate to take appropriate action- and we will do so in accordance with the rules and procedures of the Department.

And, while we are open to fair criticism, we will of course defend our investigators and prosecutors from criticism that is unfair.

Our goal is justice. All our work is subject to review with certain restraints. We will not reject justified review. Our work requires constant improvement and adjustment, but it must always be founded on integrity and law.

Nothing is more important.

Thank you.

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Indianapolis Colts' Edwin Jackson 'killed by illegal immigrant'

BBC  /  February 5, 2018

An NFL star's death by an alleged drunk-driver has sparked a political row after it emerged the suspect was in the US illegally.

Indiana police say the driver who killed NFL player Edwin Jackson was a Guatemalan who had been deported twice.

Manuel Orrego-Savala, 37, was drunk when he crashed his vehicle into Jackson, 26, and an Uber driver standing by the roadside, killing both.

According to Indiana State Police, Mr Orrego-Savala is a Guatemalan citizen who was deported from the US in 2007 and 2009.

The pickup truck driver fled the scene of the crash on foot, and gave an alias when arrested.

Police Sgt John Perrine said in a statement: "Orrego-Savala is in the United States illegally and has previously been deported on two occasions, in 2007 and again in 2009.

"State police investigators are working with US Federal Immigration Officials and they have placed a hold on Orrego-Savala."

"These horrific events only further underscore the need for immigration reform and stronger border security measures that can further prevent these tragedies from happening in the future," said Michael Joyce, a spokesman for Indiana's Republican National Committee, on Monday.

Police say Jackson was a passenger in an SUV when he fell ill, and had gotten out of the car before he was hit by the Ford F-150 pickup truck.

His Uber driver, Jeffrey Monroe, was standing beside him and was also killed in the collision early on Sunday morning, say police.

Jackson was a third-year professional, who was out with an injury for the entire 2017 season.

He had previously played for the Arizona Cardinals.

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17 states sue Trump administration over [illegal immigrant] family separations

Associated Press  /  June 26, 2018

SEATTLE — Seventeen states, including Washington, New York and California, sued President Donald Trump’s administration Tuesday in an effort to force officials to reunite [illegal immigrant] migrant families who have been separated at the U.S.-Mexico border.

The states, all of which are led by Democratic attorneys general, joined Washington, D.C., in filing the lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Seattle. It’s the first legal challenge by states over the practice.

“The administration’s practice of separating [illegal immigrant] families is cruel, plain and simple,” New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal said in an emailed statement. “Every day, it seems like the administration is issuing new, contradictory policies and relying on new, contradictory justifications. But we can’t forget: the lives of real people [illegal immigrants] hang in the balance.”

Immigration authorities have separated about 2,300 [illegal immigrant] children from their [illegal immigrant] parents in recent weeks, sparking global outrage as images and recordings of weeping children emerged. Many parents [illegal immigrant] are in custody thousands of miles from their [illegal immigrant] children, whom they have not been able to see and have rarely spoken to for a month or more.

After falsely blaming Democrats for the separations and insisting that only Congress could fix the issue, the president last week issued an executive order designed to end the practice under his “zero tolerance” policy, which prosecutes adults who come to the U.S. illegally.

But the states say his order is riddled with caveats and fails to reunite [illegal immigrant] parents and children who have already been torn apart. They accuse the administration of denying the [illegal immigrant] parents and children due process; denying the [illegal] immigrants their right [???] to seek asylum; and being arbitrary in applying the policy.

A U.S. judge in San Diego already is considering whether to issue a nationwide injunction sought by the American Civil Liberties Union that would order the administration to reunite the separated [illegal immigrant] children with their [illegal immigrant] parents.

The states that sued are Massachusetts, California, Delaware, Iowa, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia and Washington.

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Hungary understands how to realistically address illegal migration.

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On 6/27/2018 at 7:19 AM, kscarbel2 said:

Hungary understands how to realistically address illegal migration.

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He also seems to have liberal media bias figured out as well. I’d throw $100 on the table to hear him say “Deez is fake news!”. 

 

Edited by Mack Technician
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Iowa student Mollie Tibbetts killed by illegal alien

Associated Press  /  August 21, 2018

A illegal immigrant from Mexico has confessed to kidnapping college student Mollie Tibbetts while she was jogging in her small Iowa hometown, killing her and dumping her body in a cornfield.

Cristhian Bahena Rivera, 24, was arrested and charged with first-degree murder in the death of the 20-year-old Tibbetts, whose July 18 disappearance set off a massive search involving state and federal authorities.

Rivera led investigators early Tuesday to a body believed to be Tibbetts in a cornfield about 12 miles (19 kilometers) southeast of Brooklyn, Iowa, where Tibbetts was last seen running, Division of Criminal Investigation special agent Rick Rahn said.

Rivera is being held at the sheriff's office in Montezuma on $1 million cash-only bond.

President Donald Trump noted the arrest and called for immigration law changes at a rally in West Virginia.

"You heard about today with the illegal alien coming in, very sadly, from Mexico and you saw what happened to that incredible, beautiful young woman," Trump told the crowd in Charleston. "Should've never happened. Illegally in our country. We've had a huge impact, but the laws are so bad. The immigration laws are such a disgrace, we're getting them changed, but we have to get more Republicans. We have to get 'em."

Iowa's two GOP U.S. senators also described Tibbetts' death as a tragedy "that could have been prevented," and Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said residents were heartbroken and angry.

"We are angry that a broken immigration system allowed a predator like this to live in our community, and we will do all we can to bring justice to Mollie's killer," said Reynolds, a Republican.

Trump has claimed widespread crime by people living in the country illegally, citing among other things the indictments of 11 suspected MS-13 gang members from El Salvador charged in connection with the slayings of two Virginia teens.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) said that it lodged a federal immigration detainer for Rivera after he was arrested on the murder charge. That move means the agency has probable cause to believe he is subject to deportation.

Investigators said they believed Rivera had lived in the area from four to seven years. Rahn described Rivera as someone who lived in a rural area and kept to himself.

Investigators zeroed in on Rivera after obtaining footage from surveillance cameras in Brooklyn. The footage showed a Chevy Malibu connected to Rivera that was driving back and forth as Tibbetts was running in the area.

Rivera admitted to investigators he got out of his car and started running alongside Tibbetts.

Tibbetts grabbed her phone and said she was going to call the police. Rivera panicked and then said he blacked out. Rivera next remembers seeing her earphones on his lap, and taking her bloody body out of the trunk of his car.

"The defendant further described during the interview that he dragged Tibbetts on foot from his vehicle to a secluded location in a cornfield.

Investigators had earlier searched the area for Tibbetts but didn't find her, noting the body was covered by corn stalks when recovered early Tuesday.

An autopsy would be performed on the body Wednesday by the state medical examiner's office, which would assist investigators in understanding whether Tibbetts had been assaulted or tried to fight him off.

Rivera's initial court appearance is scheduled for 1 p.m. Wednesday in Montezuma.

A conviction on first-degree murder carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison without parole in Iowa, which doesn't have the death penalty.

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I think having the ability to speak one or more foreign languages is an asset. 

However, relating to legal immigrants (the only kind that should be here), they should subjugate to the American way of life......and that includes adopting English as their primary language.

If I was king for a day, I would have English declared the official language of the United States......because it should be.

I assume this murderer is an economic (illegal) migrant. He didn't come here to stay and become an American, rather he came here for a temporary period of time to profit and send money back home. He has no intention of spending the bulk of his untaxed earnings in the US. 

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Mr. Allan Richards, the attorney for illegal immigrant and murderer Cristhian Bahena Rivera who killed 20-year-old college sophomore Mollie Tibbetts, told media today that Rivera had “no prior criminal record. He was just a part of the community. An all-American boy working really hard.”

When a bar exam confirmed lawyer calls an illegal immigrant from Mexico, i.e. a Mexican citizen, an “all-American boy”, then you know how very broken we really are.

“In our system of justice, he’s entitled to that presumption of innocence until some evidence is presented. Portraying Cristhian as something that he isn’t, in some ways I view that as a political payback for what’s swirling around,” Richards continued.

An illegal immigrant is not entitled to any rights in the US under our constitution, because he/she is not a legal US citizen/resident. They are guilty of criminal act by crossing illegally onto US soil.

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Can someone please tell me why illegal immigrants are being allowed into the country???

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