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END673T Turbo Question


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You might have experienced, and you might have seen on Youtube, what happens when a turbo suffers catastrophic failure. The videos are fun to watch in a train wreck sort of way, especially when you loop the good parts and fiddle with the bass knob.

My B61 with an END673T was parked for about five years without being started or driven on a regular basis. Maybe once a year. The engine was rebuilt sometime prior to the B61's hibernation and has about 50k on it now, 5k of that since I bought it a year and a half ago. It's a great truck and there's nothing that makes me think the turbo is compromised.

Does a turbo unit give any signs of impending failure or just go crazy and start sucking oil out of the crank case like, for instance, a screaming vampire? Is there any type of PM that can be done or regular method to test a unit? It's the truck sitting for five years part that bothers me. All the wheel seals were, of course, dried and leaking when I bought the truck. Dried front wheel bearings also. Those and the second time around tires it came with were replaced with new ones but that turbo still bothers me.

I'm confident enough in the rest of my B61 to take it on a long round trip this coming Spring where it might run for a couple of days solid. It's that darned turbo. Any advice or just buy a new one and be done with it?

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Thanks, GreenGiant2! It's good to have someone in my road terror camp. Silent failure and damage from oily shrapnel that no insurance company covers. :lol:

Any preventative maintenance suggestions on turbos or idea on how many hours they usually last?

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I have an END673D in the BCR that had a Schwitzer turbo installed on it by the previous owner. It ran fine but in pulling off the intake side elbow,I could see the fins were pretty beat up.Bearings didn't seem too bad (just checked out the shaft for movement),although you could see some oil seepage.Called our local fuel inj./turbo shop.He called Schwitzer.The people he gave my numbers to,said their records don't go that far back! My local MACK dealer suggested one off of a 237 (ENDT675). Had to do some minor exhaust reconfiguring,but it runs great.If it were to go,it would be an easier find than the old Schwitzer,The old turbo did have a cooler sound to it,though! I understand completely,what you're thinking about-RELIABILTY!

IF YOU BOUGHT IT, A TRUCK BROUGHT IT..AND WHEN YOU'RE DONE WITH IT, A TRUCK WILL HAUL IT AWAY!!! Big John Trimble,WRVA

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Something I do and recommend....when starting the engine...

Manual fuel shutoff - hold the shutoff closed (no fuel) and crank the engine until you have oil pressure, then give it fuel, and let it idle for a few minutes.

Electric (key) fuel shutoff - crank the engine and after it starts, let it idle for a few minutes and you have oil pressure.

The oil system is designed to send oil to the turbo first. Never rev (accelerate) the engine without oil pressure.

Some checks...pull off the intake and exhaust pipes. Look for any evidence of oil on the fins. Also check the fins for rubbing/wear. Spin the wheels by hand and check for free/easy movement and move the shaft up and down and sideways to check for bearing wear.

  • Like 1

Ken

HOF City, PRR Country, and Charter member of the "Mack Pack"

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I have an Accusump Accumulator on my Dodge, Marmon and Autocrar. Cheap insurance in general. The accumulator holds a few quarts of engine oil under pressure. Turn the key to start and the unit pre oils the turbo and the top end. On start up the engine refills the accumulator for the next start up. I added a toggle switch to cut power to it's solenoid after initial cold start.

My thought are if in doubt swap it out. Paul

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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YOU SHOULD ALWAYS PRIME A TURBO (through the top oil feed,before re-attaching the line) UPON INSTALLING IT WITH FRESH ENGINE OIL,PRIOR TO STARTING IT! At least that's what I was always told and have done.Says so in TS442. Sorry, forgot to mention it. Al

IF YOU BOUGHT IT, A TRUCK BROUGHT IT..AND WHEN YOU'RE DONE WITH IT, A TRUCK WILL HAUL IT AWAY!!! Big John Trimble,WRVA

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have an Accusump Accumulator on my Dodge, Marmon and Autocrar. Cheap insurance in general. The accumulator holds a few quarts of engine oil under pressure. Turn the key to start and the unit pre oils the turbo and the top end. On start up the engine refills the accumulator for the next start up. I added a toggle switch to cut power to it's solenoid after initial cold start.

My thought are if in doubt swap it out. Paul

We had this thing called a Boda Turbo-Lube on a couple of our firetrucks (the ones we have that I wont admit to having green leakers........)

TWO STROKES ARE FOR GARDEN TOOLS

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