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New Mack Granite "Belt" Concrete Mixer


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Wonder what kind of premium they get per yard for this service? Has to be a very high maintenance cost unit. then again cheaper than bringing in a pump. In any case I think the days of rear discharge mixers are numbered except for certain applications- like big volume jobs feeding a pump.

But for the average delivery, a front discharge is placing concrete literally the minute the truck hits the jobsite. Once contractors get used to that, they don't want to screw around with some guy backing up to forms, wrestling chutes etc.

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They get $180-$200 per load for the belt conveyor - much less expensive than a pump. Harrison/Old Castle Materials are really in the road building business along with aggregate production, asphalt production and ready mix concrete - front discharge trucks don't seem to do as well for pouring curbs and roads. Front Discharge trucks cost 2-3 times as much in maintenance costs versus rear discharge trucks plus higher initial purchase costs. Still for smaller pours especially around houses and foundations contractors will usually pay more for the front discharge truck.

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They get $180-$200 per load for the belt conveyor - much less expensive than a pump. Harrison/Old Castle Materials are really in the road building business along with aggregate production, asphalt production and ready mix concrete - front discharge trucks don't seem to do as well for pouring curbs and roads. Front Discharge trucks cost 2-3 times as much in maintenance costs versus rear discharge trucks plus higher initial purchase costs. Still for smaller pours especially around houses and foundations contractors will usually pay more for the front discharge truck.

The few advances I've worked on are a PIA to do anything on really. The upper driveshafts are a b*tch. The only thing nice is rad/air to air changes or engine overhauls...

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Looks like they have to get the mix slumped near perfect at the plant. With the size of the water tank which looks to be less than 200 gallons, there is plenty of area to wash down over a standard mixer. Oh, don't forget the laborers always run for your water hose because their shovels and trowels are more important to wash than your 6 figure truck!

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Clayton in Jersey had a lot on belt discharge mixers, I think they were still running a few when the Freedom Bridge was done. Paul

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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They get $180-$200 per load for the belt conveyor - much less expensive than a pump. Harrison/Old Castle Materials are really in the road building business along with aggregate production, asphalt production and ready mix concrete - front discharge trucks don't seem to do as well for pouring curbs and roads. Front Discharge trucks cost 2-3 times as much in maintenance costs versus rear discharge trucks plus higher initial purchase costs. Still for smaller pours especially around houses and foundations contractors will usually pay more for the front discharge truck.

200 buck premium per load for this thing sounds like a bargain. Kind of surprised the maintenance cost for a front discharge would be twice to three times a conventional. In any case as always, nothing like the right tool for the job. I'm sure there are plenty of jobs were a belt mixer is the most cost effective answer. If had a redi-mix business of size I would think a good mix of rear/front/belts would cover all the bases. Not exactly good from a parts/maintenance perspective but in a competitive business, the customer rules-unless you are the only game in town.

Again here in this neck of the woods (Mass) I would bet front discharge is 3 to 1 on replacements.

"

PS Wheeled my share of concrete off the ass end of B-81's, LJ's, A-cars using a "Jackson prime mover" in my youth (EJ- Foxon, Velardi etc)-but in my old age can appreciate the new technology

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200 buck premium per load for this thing sounds like a bargain. Kind of surprised the maintenance cost for a front discharge would be twice to three times a conventional. In any case as always, nothing like the right tool for the job. I'm sure there are plenty of jobs were a belt mixer is the most cost effective answer. If had a redi-mix business of size I would think a good mix of rear/front/belts would cover all the bases. Not exactly good from a parts/maintenance perspective but in a competitive business, the customer rules-unless you are the only game in town.

Again here in this neck of the woods (Mass) I would bet front discharge is 3 to 1 on replacements.

"

PS Wheeled my share of concrete off the ass end of B-81's, LJ's, A-cars using a "Jackson prime mover" in my youth (EJ- Foxon, Velardi etc)-but in my old age can appreciate the new technology

We have one of Foxon's old wreckers turned dumps.

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Matt

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