Keith Pommerening

Big Dog
  • Content count

    125
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147 Excellent

About Keith Pommerening

  • Rank
    BMT Veteran VIP
  • Birthday 04/20/1953

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Bemidji, Mn

Previous Fields

  • Make
    Mack
  • Model
    A40H Chassis #8470
  • Year
    1952
  • Other Trucks
    None

Recent Profile Visitors

1,456 profile views
  1. The Hudsons that ruled NASCAR, when stock cars were STOCK cars, ran a 308ci inline six flathead. It would turn 6000 rpm back then with the 7X engine. Their handling might have been the biggest factor. Talked to a old guy who use to run Olsmobiles at Minnesota State Fairgrounds. He told me he would blow by the Hudson in the straight and while his Olds was jumping and hopping in the corners the Hudson would motor around him like he was on a Sunday drive! Also said the winner was usually the one that didn't brake-down. Hudson was the first to produce unibody cars with a front clip like Camaros, Novas, Mustangs... The front steering arms connected in the center of frame and were actuated with a bellcrank. No drag links. Another inovation I've seen on no other cars is the rear sping layout. They angled the rear spings toward the center of the front axle, in a truncated "V" pattern. Wider in the rear and narrower in the front. Like running a line from the front axle steering pins, through the steering ball joint and back to the center of rear axle. The Ackerman principle drawn out. Don't know if that was a big deal, but interesting concept. They were also overbuilt because no one knew what would fail first with the unibody/front clip build style.
  2. Fuel additives discussion

    It's going to be a mild winter and not much snow. Put the blankets on the septic field so it will not freeze, and mounted the snowblower on tractor. Be ready for it and it will not happen. Love the smell of diesel smoke in the morning, it means the truck started, well at least for a while!
  3. Fuel additives discussion

    Company gives me a credit card and it's not Cenex. Suppose I could ask them and see if I can change, station is only two blocks away. Would be handier. Neighbors were loggers and they were using Cenex lubricants. Had trouble with engines needing overhauls sooner then normal. They switched oil brands and got many more hours before overhauls. This goes back 10-15 years so sure things have changed by now. I do run a fairly high percentage of #1 in the winter. Can buy alot of #1 for the cost of one roadside freeze-up. Truck sits outside all the time, only runs during week days, has no tank heaters. See most additives are a thicker "oil" like substance. I wonder if that would make any difference when it gets cold, as far as pour point is affected. Would suspect at 3-4 oz per 10 gallons probably not. Additive costs $30.00 for a gallon at truck stop! Last me 2-3 weeks.
  4. Fuel additives discussion

    I think my injectors are getting bad, if I add the injector cleaner/lubricator it makes engine run like normal. It is an Isuzu FTR with the 7.8 litre engine. Have 320,000+ delivery miles on it. Have never had to add oil between oil changes at 6500 miles. The problem I am having: If I accelerate too fast, or press the pedal too hard before engine is in upper rev-range, engine will go "soft" for a second, loose some power and have an additional mild vibration. Shut it off and let sit a minute and it will go back to normal. Some times it like to roll black smoke. Shows no code on computer. I started using Lucas fuel treatment and the truck runs properly just about all the time. If the ratio gets weak the problem re-emergess. Increase the amount of conditioner and engine runs properly again. Suppose to get a new truck after the first of the year, but I think my luck will runout first. Injectors are $650.00 each and 12 hours labor. Truck is only worth about $3000.00 the boss tells me. I am at a satalite wharehouse but at the main wharehouse they have started buying better quality fuel and adding additive and they believe it is worth the expense. Mostly run ND, MN and MT, yea it gets real cold at times.
  5. hmmmmm

    Had a windstorm a few years ago and we lost a forked tree. Had this sawn on a band saw with the intention to use it on a timber framed addition to our house. Wife threw when she saw this and put a stop to that plan. I didn't see what shee saw.
  6. Chrome rims for spokes

    Might want to look into powder coating. Have seen some that looks VERY close to chrome.
  7. '54 Plymouth Bit more than a buff out

    Might be worth that much in lead scrap.
  8. long awaited work shop finally started

    Ever take a sledge and try busting-up that fiber cement? My house is built on a floating slab, 4" floor and footings are 12" deep and 18" wide. Have hydronic heat tubing attatched to 1/2" rebar and used fiber cement. Put a heat tube in the footings. Have 2" foam 4'X8' sheets around perimeter. Stick out 4' from footings. They are laid down at a 45 degree angle. Builder called them "Canadian footings". Claims frost will not go through 2" foam but will come around the end, then down and back at 45 dergrees. The floor is ceramic tile and not a crack any where, so is working well. Been 17 years so far... Only use off peak electric for heat and is cheap to heat the two story house. Few places in the lower 48 get colder or have longer winters.
  9. Sunday drive

    Yea, I was being a pessimistic smart ash when I wrote that. I hunt the far north forest here in Mn, and the wolves have really raised hell with the deer up there. They took the wolves off the endanger species list and allowed very minimal harvesting here. At least until the "big hearts" from the twin cities raised so much hell about it the state gave up on trying to control them. It's shoot, shovel and shut-up now. Was listening to the brush wolves howling last night and I only live four miles from downtown Bemidji. Some times I hear them on the river near my house. A couple years ago I had been on a ground stand for quite a while and was half asleep when I seen, what at first sight, looked like a Shetland pony walk into my shooting lane. Thought that can't be real, of course it wasn't. What is was was a huge Timber 30 yards out. Gotta say, he sure was pretty. Had the crosshairs on him and safety off. Thought about it for a minute. I hunt with a state trooper and didn't want to put him in some kind of jeopardy so just watched him wander around for a while and let him go. A year later a friend was on a stand about a half mile from there. He had a doe come out, but she kept looking back. He was excited expecting a big buck to be following her. No, another Timber, but this one had a radio collar. The doe would move just enough to keep about 50 yards between them. We think she was too tired to try and out run him.
  10. Sunday drive

    There is so many Bison because they shot all the Timber Wolves the state of Minnesota gave them to help control the numbers.
  11. OK now what do I do????

    Yes that is a "northern style" truck. Gotta like the auxilary heater in the floor, makes alot of sense. Never seen so many switches on a glovebox door!
  12. New Mack for the fall

    Good idea. Remember driving with a couple more "round" drivers, they would have little pin hole in thier t-shirts from the steering wheel rubbing on the "roundness." Seen a couple steering wheels with that shape on custom street rods. Maybe another take on the white stripe you see on race cars so drivers can tell when wheels are straight with drag strip.
  13. Dodge Market News

    Teamsrrrrgirrl read this? Is this another Beck or Hoffa style of union leadership for union brothers and sisters? Suppose "union style" justice will take care of this within house. Some things are constant, good democrats.
  14. Batteries

    My truck started doing the same thing yesterday. The guy who works on truck came out and gave me a pull to start it. Thought that was pretty good service. Most would say get a $500 tow to the shop. Started up this morning, no problem. Tried to leave it run all day but idiot driver shut it off to fuel and wouldn't start. Friend at truck stop said he would give me a pull, got back in truck and started right up. What is the difference between welding cables and battery cables? Had a guy tell me welding cables have many fine wires and battery cables have heavier guage wires in them. He claimed the welder cables fail sooner when used on trucks or equipment.
  15. Swap Meet KD517s

    Picked up two KD517 and a DU RAY. The more shiny one is from my A-40. Lense is amber and has 1960 on bottom rim and no other marking. Has "stepped" sides. Has KD517, PAT and 12461 enbossed on top of housing. There was a rubber gasket the light sits into on the truck, extremely brittle. Cloth wrapped wire. 1. Paid $35 for black one. The amber glass lense says KD517 on top and has 1960 on the bottom. Also have "SEMA APPROVED" on both lense and housing, Has cloth covered wire and "stepped" sides. Housing has K-D517, APPROVED SEMA, and A??D124618. embossed into it. 2. Paid $10 for silver one. Red plastic lens has LS334 on it. Housing has KD517 and SAE P embossed into it. Looks like ss steel but not shiny. Non "stepped" sides. Plastic coated wire. 3. DU RAY was also $10. Just a nice looking red glass lensed light. Plastic coated wire. When comparing the DU RAY to KDs I noticed a couple quality things. All had cork gaskets under lenses. KD had ss screws and DU RAY had steel. The KDs had brass where screws entered bases, DU RAY were just plain steel bases. Fun afternoon at swap meet was finished off with a Walleye fish feed with friends--GOOD DAY! Thanks, Keith