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He bought the first Scania V8


kscarbel2
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Scania Group Press Release  /  June 17, 2019

Thanks to some detective work and help from reliable Scania enthusiasts, we managed to track down the owner of the very first Scania V8 to roll off the production line. “I have always had a passion for new technology – now I’m driving electric,” says Henrik Olsson, now 81 years old.

In the late 1960s, Henrik Olsson needed a replacement for the Scania LS76 that his transport company was using for timber haulage in the forests of Värmland in western Sweden. The contract for a new Scania had already been signed when, one Sunday, the salesman called again.

“He said he’d heard a rumour about the release of a completely new model, a V8,” recalls Olsson, “and wondered if I’d be interested in becoming the first person to buy an LBT140.”

Need for extra power

That didn’t require much thought. Of course he was keen on the extra power: 350 hp compared with the 260 of the LS76. “We really needed that to handle the steep, slippery dirt roads. The LBT140 provided a sense of security. You knew you’d manage the hills without any problem.”

Initially however, the new truck was not completely hassle-free. The engine was so powerful that the drive shaft broke a couple of times. “But on those occasions, the service was outstanding,” says Olsson. “That’s one of the reasons we stuck with Scania – plus the fact that the truck was good, of course.”

“I’d love to start over again so I could drive electric trucks.”

Having run his company for 20 years, Olsson sold the business, becoming an official for the Värmland province hauliers’ association. Now retired, he maintains a passion for vehicles.

awaiting the delivery of the latest model.

“I’ve always been interested in new technology, so of course I was curious. Driving an electric vehicle is a great feeling; the car reacts instantly, feels powerful and is completely quiet. I’d love to start over again as a driver so I could drive electric trucks.”

So what happened to the first Scania V8? After four years and 600,000 problem-free kilometres, it was replaced. Its ultimate fate is unknown.

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6 minutes ago, james j neiweem said:

Are you saying that the first Scania V8 was a Mack engine? Interesting.

Yes, born from Mack’s long time relationship with Scania, and the old man’s idea to gain economy of scale via such an agreement.

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8 hours ago, Jamaican Bulldog said:

Why did the Scania versions of the Mack V8s have individual heads?

Because that was the norm in Europe at the time, owing to it's advantages.

Scania's feeling to this day is that individual cylinder heads have several advantages. A cylinder head covering more than one cylinder imposes restrictions on the maximum potential for achieving efficient intake and exhaust flow, because provisions for cooling and clamping compromise cylinder head design. Since individual cylinder heads don't suffer from these obstacles, the head design can be optimized for rapid gas flow to achieve maximum fuel efficiency.

And regarding maintenance, it's much cheaper and faster to remove and reinstall an individual cylinder head, than a single cylinder head covering two to six cylinders.

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Pretty much all larger diesels such as marine propulsion and electric power production have individual cylinder heads. GE, EMD, Pielstick, Suzler, Cat, Janmar, Waukashaw, Cooper Bessemer etc. FM opposed piston engines were an exception as they had no heads. Scania followed this design in their V8. As KS states it is easier to fine tune an individual cylinder  as opposed to a group of cylinders hooked up to multi ported intake and exhaust manifolds. KS also noted the maintenance advantages. Scania was wise to follow this design into the smaller engine design. I believe Scania also uses this design in some of their six cylinder designs.

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And it's cheaper to make one head to fit all configurations of motors whether its a 1, 2, 3, 4, or what ever the case maybe

This single head per cylinder was pretty common in Europe on trucks tractors and just about any type of diesel engine 

Paul 

Edited by mrsmackpaul
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At a guess I would think it's more expensive to manufacture as on a V8 you have 8 heads to machine as opposed to  two or 4 on a E9

So at least twice the setup for machining and twice as many heads to machine 

Paul 

 

Edited by mrsmackpaul
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