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Noid93

Suspension Bushing/steer Tires

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I am having problems with the front steer tires on my truck. The outside inch on both tires are wearng much faster than the rest of the tires. It just started to get bad on the last half of the tread on the steers. This is the research i have done. I have a 200 inch wheel base, and im not sure if the short wheelbase adds to these problems(especialy turning).

1) The tow in/out is towed in 1/4 inch(perfect)

2) King pins are tight, less than 1/32 of an inch play(jacked up the front axle and wiggled tires by inserting a bar in the holes on the rims)

3)Rear tires are not cutting/cupping in any excessive way.

4) The past two weeks we have been hauling potatoes about 300 mi one way across some very cupped roads(pavement has settled where your tires run) in excess of 90,000 lbs gross wt.. One to two loads a day.

5) The passanger side now has two flat spots next to each other on this outside inch.

6) My fifth wheel plate has been staying fairly well lubricated(lucas fifth wheel lube).

7) Im only carring less than 12500 lbs on the front axle every load consistanly.

8) It does not pull quickly in any direction if i let go of the wheel.

Is it just a set of poor tires being getting wore out, the cupped roads or where i drive on the roads(putting the pass tire on the edge of the hump in the road), or a combo...

I just here horror stories about trucks going to an alignment shop and them telling people the bushing are OUT in the rear end. By visual inspection, all my bushings are looking good in all the torque rods an adjusting rods. What does it mean to "have the bushings out????". I have a hendrickson air ride rear suspension. HAS 400 or similar.

If any body can tell me what to check or look at to see if i can diagnose this myself without a $1000 visit to an alingment shop i would appriciate it.

Thanks for your time guys...

CURT

NOID93 :(:unsure::wacko::blink::pat:

CHECK THIS OUT AND TELL ME WHAT YOU THINK. http://www.bridgestonetrucktires.com/us_en...ctor_wear.asp#2

Edited by Noid93

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As I remember, 1/8 in was about right for toe-in.

I think MidniteMechanic is right!

Packer

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I would say you have a bad shock on the right side. And way too much toe in.

It is possible that Noid is referring to total toe in which 1/4" would be correct. I agree that a bad shock absorber could add to the dilemma if the problem is more pronounced on only one side. Worn bushings, and spring schackles can also play into the mix. Usually outside chopping on a tire can be traced to something worn, or loose. I would raise the steer axle off of the ground and support the tractor at the frame to let the front end hang free to shake and jack at different points to locate any loose or worn parts.

Just some of my useless thoughts.

Rob

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If anyone knows how to delete a double posting, let me know.

Edited by Noid93

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wow thats alot of potatoes

Yeah that is alot of potatoes. My timpte trailer(72 in sides, 42 ft long, 96 in sides and ag tubs for ground clearance), is heaped plum full and can gross 92,000+/- 500 lbs every load. Anyway........

EXTRA EXTRA...... UPDATE

Today i installed new shocks, dismounted the tires, took out the equal(balancing powder), remounted with the wore sides in, had them spin balanced($60)??? with lead weights, installed centramatic wheel balancers, and bolted them back on. The very little shimmy i had when i went down the road between 55 and 65 has completely gone away. Tip of my hat to centramatic.. Great buy at $155. Upon inspection i ended up doing a wheel seal on the drivers side. I will try to keep you updated on how these mods work out.

Thanks for all your help everyone, BUT PLEASE DO NOT STOP ADDING TO THIS POST. EVERY THING MENTIONED I WILL LOOK AT AND LEARN MORE AND MORE FROM. ANY OTHER IDEAS, PLEASE PLEASE POST..

Thanks again, :blink:

Curt

NOID93

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1/4 of an inch toe in would wear the outsides of the tires pretty quick. Im guessing theyre radial tires and radial tires should run very little toed in. Anywere from a 1/16 to an 1/8 of an inch.

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1/4 of an inch toe in would wear the outsides of the tires pretty quick. Im guessing theyre radial tires and radial tires should run very little toed in. Anywere from a 1/16 to an 1/8 of an inch.

When i checked the toe, i had the front axle in the air. From what i have heard, you are to check the toe with weight on the axle, drive ahead 10 or so ft, and not slam the brakes to or jar the suspension. If im thinking correctly, when i checked it it was less than 1/4 inch hanging, so by the time i put weight on it and such it should be 1/16 to 1/8.

To do a quick check like i did, with the wheels in the air, i painted a ring all the way around the tire tread with spray paint, held a flat screw driver on the paint very still while someone else rotated the tire to etch a line on the paint, then proceeded to check distance on the front of the tire and on the rear with a difference of <1/4 inch.

Let me know if this procedure sounds right.

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On radial tires, I always set toe to dead ahead or less than 1/16 toe in. Bias tires require more toe to drive straight.

Also, for marking the tires, I drive a nail into the end of a 4' piece of 4X4 at a 45* angle and cut the head off. Jack up tire, place nail against center of tire holding board down with knee, turn tire to mark. Do this on each side and then check toe with tape measure (just don't ask the Ol Lady to hold the "dumb end" of the tape)

Jeff

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Acording to the mack maintenance and lube manual, toe in is 1/16" plus or minus 1/32". We usually set them them at 3/32" toed in with the truck unloaded. We have sent alot of truck to the alinment shop to have the axle bent to get the camber set right. To much positive camber could wear just the outside of the tires funny. Good luck because tires are $$$$

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A 1/16 in to straight ahead with radial tires, works good for me. So does a block of wood with a nail for scribing the tires. But, the truck needs to be at ride height to set the toe in. If you set the toe in with the suspension hanging, any wear you might have in the tie rod ends, king pin bushings, or even a loose wheel bearing, will compound any error in measurement. If you will take a couple of milk jugs with a little water to keep them from moving around. Set one at the rear of each tire, then measure across the top of the jugs. Your tape measure will be at the same height on each side. Do the front side the same way. When you are satisfied with your adjustment, move the jug to the rear of the tire. With a tire crayon, or some white out, or whatever, mark the sidewall at the top of the jug, then move the jug to the front, and roll the truck forward until the mark lines up with the jug. Check the toe in again, Your measurements have to repeat their self, if not, go through the whole procedure again. If your measurement still won't repeat, then you will have to figure out why. Sometime, a trip to to the frame shop is a good investment. If the steering geometry isn't right to start with, you sure can't make it right with a tape measure and a block of wood with a nail in it. I hope you get this problem resolved, James.

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