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Might be more potential for Mack in the military market with this. I would think it would need to be built in the US. Renault has a pretty big military defense business (insert French military joke here).

Renault Trucks Defense to acquire French manufacturer Panhard

STOCKHOLM--Renault Trucks Defense, included in Swedish truck maker Volvo AB's (VOLV-B.SK) governmental sales business area, said Thursday it will acquire French automotive manufacturer Panhard for an undisclosed sum.

The transaction, which is expected to be finalized in the fourth quarter, isn't anticipated to have any significant impact on the Volvo Group's earnings and financial position. Approval is required from the relevant authorities.

Panhard is a private company which has a background in the car industry and specializes in manufacturing light transport vehicles adapted for defense operations. In 2011, Panhard reported sales of 81 million euros ($98.1 million) and operating profit amounted to EUR9.4 million. The company has about 300 employees.

Renault Trucks Defense is included in the Volvo Group's governmental sales business area. The operation produces and sells vehicles adapted for operations in defense, security and international projects. Renault Trucks Defense has about 500 employees, mainly in France.

http://www.panhard.fr/anglais/index.htm

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This creation has long impressed me. I’m sure someone told this gentleman it couldn’t be done, but where there’s a will.......... This isn’t a 6x6 Mack CL-700 because Mack never produced one (although

While Mack’s U.S. operations have had an on-again, off-again history of doing business with the US military (an incredible direct-sales absence from 1965 thru 2004), the company’s Australian unit was

By 1973, the U.S. Army’s 10-ton Mack M123 fleet was aging. A new and larger replacement was desired. After testing two prototypes from Kenworth (XM523 and XM523E1), the army tried the International Ha

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Oh my GOD I sure hope they arn't Cat A-Cert Motors, or we are sure to lose the next war!!!

BULLHUSK

I havent been in one of them new fangled HET's I had to deal with the old 2 strokers but they pulled pretty darn good (I guess they should geared to max out at 45 mph) I know that all the G.P. International Armored trucks we had in Iraq were powered by a CAT Acert 475 and an Eaton 18spd autoshift, I drove one once and was not a fan. But I have a pic.

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"Any Society that would give up a little LIBERTY to gain a little SECURITY will Deserve Neither and LOSE BOTH" -Benjamin Franklin

"If your gonna be STUPID, you gotta be TOUGH"

"You cant always get what you want, but if you try sometimes you get what you need"

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Heres our two strokers, some of em.

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"Any Society that would give up a little LIBERTY to gain a little SECURITY will Deserve Neither and LOSE BOTH" -Benjamin Franklin

"If your gonna be STUPID, you gotta be TOUGH"

"You cant always get what you want, but if you try sometimes you get what you need"

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Mack trucks are well known for business construction and are use as most durable truck. In business it much essential to have proper transfer of goods from one place to another place on regular basis and using such trucks you will able to complete such task successfully .

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Here's a Mack 5-ton tactical cargo that many are probably unaware of.

________________________________________________________

The Mack T54 5-ton cargo prototype

When the U.S. Army began developing their new 6x6 fleet during the 1948-1950 period, GMC’s T51 concept was selected for the 2-1/2 ton category, and Mack Trucks was chosen to produce a prototype in the 5-ton range resulting in the T54. The Mack T54 was also tested alongside the 5-ton XM41 developed by International.

The Mack T54 used the same 250 horsepower air-cooled opposed-piston 8-cylinder Continental OA 536-1 engine as the GMC T51. However, whereas GMC T51’s opposed piston engine was mounted with its crankshaft in a vertical position (driving down and back to a semi-automatic Allison TT-270-1 3-speed planetary transmission and single-speed transfer case), the engine in the Mack T54 was mounted conventionally with the crankshaft in a horizontal position. The Mack T54 used the same Allison transmission and single-speed transfer case

Work on the T54 began in 1947 and was suspended in 1953. Two prototypes were built. One had an aluminum cargo body and weighed in at 18,450 pounds, while the other had a steel cargo body and weighed 19,600 pounds. Both had aluminum cabs. The flat engine configuration and lack of a radiator allowed for a sloped engine hood providing superb visibility.

The front axle featured a torsion bar independent suspension, while the rear bogie utilized a leaf spring and walking beam suspension.

A central tire inflation was installed, mounted on the inside of the wheels, controllable from inside the cab.

A 20,000 pound capacity Tulsa model 24 winch was mounted in the front, and a 2,000 pound capacity Anthony hydraulic tailgate was fitted.

In the end, the army abandoned the expensive advanced design of the Mack and GMC prototypes, including opposed cylinder air-cooled engines, independent torsion bar front suspension, sealed brakes and aluminum bodies in favor of the lower cost conventionally designed M41 (single rear tire) and M50 series (dual rear tire). The M41 cargo was produced by International and Diamond T, while the M51 dump, M52 tractor and M54 cargo were also produced by Mack Trucks. The A1 versions (e.g. M54A1) featured a turbocharged Mack ENDT-673 (205hp@2,100rpm) diesel engine in lieu of the standard Continental R-6602 (224hp@2,800rpm) gasoline engine, and were easily distinguished by their vertical exhaust and large externally-mounted (right-side fender) air cleaner.

Specifications - Mack T54 prototype:

Engine: 250hp Continental OA 536-1 air-cooled opposed-piston 8-cylinder

Displacement: 537.6 cu.in.

Power: 250hp @ 3,000rpm

Ignition: Magneto

Transmission: Allison TT-270-1 semi-automatic 3-speed planetary transmission

Transfer case: single speed

Tires: 14.00x20

Top speed: 50 mph

Cruise range: 300 miles (on 75 gallons of gasoline)

Length: 23 feet 10.5 inches

Height: 122 inches (reducible to 88.5 inches)

Width: 96 inches

Wheelbase: 155 inches

Approach angle: 35º

Departure angle: 40º

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Here's something you don't see every day. During the war, the German army (Wehrmacht) operated thousands of captured trucks from various countries. This is a photograph of a captured Mack E model (EE, EF or EG?) in service with the 216th Engineering Battalion in 1940 somewhere in Belgium. I don't know if it came from the defeated Belgian army, French army or retreating British Expeditionary Force.

Similarly, the French had purchased 1,500 model 704S 3-ton Whites in 1939 which were captured and put to work by the Wehrmacht (as shown below).

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This one is probably from Belgian or Dutch army or civilian use. Has local produced cab that was typical for Holland.

Wermacht used also lots of captured Russian trucks. Along with tanks and steam locomotives.

Many ex-French and British vehicles found their end in forests and clay roads of East front.

You can see "WH" on the left fender as Germans marked vehicles of service in Wermacht.

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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The Wehrmacht did indeed use many captured Russian army trucks, and one was the Studebaker US6. Over 200,000 were built for Lend-Lease countries. It was declared "Limited Standard" by the US military. Basically, the US Army purchased GMCs, the US Navy and Marine Corps purchased International Harvesters, and Studebakers went to Lend-Lease Countries.

Of the 200,000 US6s built, 150,000 were shipped to Russia. The two exceptions were US6s allocated to US Army engineering units that built the Burma Road, and the Alaska-Canada Highway (linking the 48 states to Alaska so as to reinforce Alaska - resulting from the Japanese capture of Kiska island and Attu island in the Aleutians).

Here's a picture of a Wehrmacht unit operating a captured American Studebaker US6 in Hungary in 1944, followed by a Peugeot and a German Ford (Ford-Werke AG produced over 20,000 vehicles in Germany for the German military during WW2).

The Germans also operated many American Studebaker K25s captured from the French army. France had purchased 2,000 units in 1939. Here's a picture of one of these rugged trucks fitted with a 2cm anti-aircraft gun, operating in Libya in December 1941.

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There were many impressive wreckers produced during the WW2 period from truck manufacturers including Biederman, Corbitt, Federal, Kenworth and Ward La France. However among them all, I think the Mack EHU wreckers sold to the U.S. Marine Corps in 1939 were the sharpest looking of the bunch.

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Here's something you don't see every day. During the war, the German army (Wehrmacht) operated thousands of captured trucks from various countries. This is a photograph of a captured Mack E model (EE, EF or EG?) in service with the 216th Engineering Battalion in 1940 somewhere in Belgium. I don't know if it came from the defeated Belgian army, French army or retreating British Expeditionary Force.

Similarly, the French had purchased 1,500 model 704S 3-ton Whites in 1939 which were captured and put to work by the Wehrmacht (as shown below).

Wonder what's with the cab on the "E" model------it has a two piece windshield!!?

Ron

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Wonder what's with the cab on the "E" model------it has a two piece windshield!!?

Ron

The book tells me the cab was installed by "Terlouw en Van Yperen" firm in Holland.

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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The Wehrmacht did indeed use many captured Russian army trucks, and one was the Studebaker US6. Over 200,000 were built for Lend-Lease countries. It was declared "Limited Standard" by the US military. Basically, the US Army purchased GMCs, the US Navy and Marine Corps purchased International Harvesters, and Studebakers went to Lend-Lease Countries.

Of the 200,000 US6s built, 150,000 were shipped to Russia. The two exceptions were US6s allocated to US Army engineering units that built the Burma Road, and the Alaska-Canada Highway (linking the 48 states to Alaska so as to reinforce Alaska - resulting from the Japanese capture of Kiska island and Attu island in the Aleutians).

Here's a picture of a Wehrmacht unit operating a captured American Studebaker US6 in Hungary in 1944, followed by a Peugeot and a German Ford (Ford-Werke AG produced over 20,000 vehicles in Germany for the German military during WW2).

The Germans also operated many American Studebaker K25s captured from the French army. France had purchased 2,000 units in 1939. Here's a picture of one of these rugged trucks fitted with a 2cm anti-aircraft gun, operating in Libya in December 1941.

Most well-known Lend-Lease American truck in Russia was Studebaker. Along with Willises and Harley-D's.

As I told many times, the thema of Lend-Lease was unpopularized in Soviet Union during the Cold war time.

If you add here that no privat person could have a truck as a property until 1991 (Socializm was a prohibitation of privat property for any production facilities) you can wonder how many Lend-Lease trucks survived here. Probably some hundreds all'round the country. Or maybe less.

Little addition: During 90's years and earlier I haven't see any photo of Lend-Lease Macks in Russian books. One pencil-draw picture only. They became later, many of, but when the internet start to be of service.

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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That's a Renault "Sherpa", designed, produced and sold by "Renault Trucks Defense". Not sure why Volvo Group is trying to pass it off as a Mack-branded product. It has an Americanized version of the French Caesar artillery system incorporating a 105mm howitzer. This French system has been given a U.S. style name - Hawkeye.

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That's a Renault "Sherpa", designed, produced and sold by "Renault Trucks Defense". Not sure why Volvo Group is trying to pass it off as a Mack-branded product. It has an Americanized version of the French Caesar artillery system incorporating a 105mm howitzer. This French system has been given a U.S. style name - Hawkeye.

They had a few Mack branded military trucks behind the CCC in Allentown..

Still the Greatest Name in Trucks...Bulldogs rule, The rest drool....

Member ATHS and ATCA...

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Maybe James.

FIAT built the car production plant in Russia in late 60's and it made revolution in Russian car building. They are LADA's now. Not good enough nowadays but were 2 steps in front of everything produced until they became. I'm shure FIAT got good income from Soviet govnt and had no sorries. As about Mack it was the Cold war time and politic played his role more than economy. Interesting fact (maybe I told you): nobody overhere knows about that project. Although 99% people in Russia doesn't know what Mack is it!

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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For those unfamiliar with what we're talking about, let me take a moment to explain. At the same time that Mack Trucks was achieving major sales success in Europe, the Middle East and Iran, the opening up of the Soviet Union presented a major opportunity for the company.

It is ironic that, while politics prevented Mack Trucks from cooperating with Russia on the HUGE KamAZ truck plant project, many other U.S. companies were in the end allowed to participate, bringing them vast profits while giving the Russians their first state-of-the-art commercial truck production facility (see Summary below).

Mack Trucks Signs Pact with Russia

Business Week Magazine / June 18, 1971

The Soviet Union and Mack Trucks, Inc. have signed a $700 million preliminary agreement for the U.S. company to supply machinery and technology for a huge Russian truck manufacturing plant.

The agreement is subject to approval by the U.S. government.

It was signed by Zenon C.R. Hansen, chairman and president of Mack Trucks, and N.D. Komarov, Russian deputy foreign trade minister, May 18 at the company’s Allentown, PA headquarters.

Hansen, commenting in a telephone interview, said he would describe the result of the talks with the Russians as a “letter of intent” rather than as a preliminary agreement.

Hansen said that “with the changing attitudes on east-west trade,” he was enthusiastic about the prospects of government approval.

The proposed deal could have a skyrocketing effect on U.S.-Russian trade. Total U.S. exports to Russia amounted to only $118 million in 1970.

The Russians were reported to be clearing land for the $1.3 billion project near Naberezhnle Chelney, 600 miles east of Moscow in the Tartar Republic.The project was said to include housing for an eventual 300,000 people.

The plant may require an estimated $1 billion worth of machinery and technology before it is completed.

Export of Mack Trucks To Russia May Be Near

SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS / August 10, 1971

(WASHINGTON) The Nixon administration approved licenses Monday for export of million worth of foundry equipment to the Soviet Union, apparently clearing the way for a massive trade deal involving Mack Trucks Inc.

Although the two licenses approved went to a company other than Mack, a Commerce Department spokesman said the action was “related to the project on the Kama river” where the Allentown, Pa. firm proposes to build what is billed as the world's largest truck plant.

Commerce officials said privately the action would be a first step in approval of the Mack Truck deal but said It should not be construed as meaning a final decision has been made.

The department approved three licenses altogether, including one for export of technical data for iron and steel foundries. Equipment for automotive castings was among items listed. The firm went unidentified, in line with department policy.

Roger Mullin, executive vice president of Mack Trucks, said the export licenses approved were “definitely not for us. Our application is for machine tools.” But he said foundry equipment would be necessary before a truck plant could be built.

Mack Trucks signed an agreement with the Soviet government this spring to build the Kama River project. The Mack Trucks spokesman said the cost is just a guess, but he said estimates have run between $1 billion and $2 billion.

Mack Trucks, as a result of the agreement, is seeking authority to export an estimated $700 million worth of machinery and technology to the Soviet Union.

The company spokesman, asked whether the government’s action indicated the administration will act favorably on the entire deal, said he would not speculate on what would happen next. He said “your question would lead logically” to the conclusion the administration is looking on the application favorably.

Mullin said in reference to the foundry equipment: “It is an essential part. We would have to have a foundry.”

The government refuses to name the companies for which it approves export licenses. A spokesman said it only referred to the Kama River project because it had been previously announced by the parties involved. Officials said a step-by-step approval process may be used in granting licenses for the project.

The Commerce Department’s Office of Export Control passes on specific export licenses for export of equipment forbidden under government regulations. Such high-technology items as foundry equipment are prohibited from being exported, unless a specific license is granted by the government.

About a year ago, Henry Ford II went to Moscow in an attempt, later abandoned, to complete a similar agreement.

At that time, Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird commented: “Before giving away the technology to construct trucks in the Soviet Union, and establishing plants for them, there should be some indication on the part of the Soviet Union that they are not going to continue sending trucks to North Vietnam by the shiploads for use on the Ho Chi Minh Trail.”

There was no Defense Department comment on Monday’s action by the Commerce Department.

Mack cancels Soviet Plant

The Miami News / Sept 16, 1971

Mack Trucks, Inc. has cancelled plans to build the world’s largest truck plant in the Soviet Union. Mack said it has not received U.S. approval.

Mack signed a preliminary agreement with Soviet officials last May 18, providing that the Allentown, Pa. firm would design and supply a major part of the Soviet Union’s $1.4 billion Kama River truck plant.

The deal, Mack said, hinged on whether the White House was willing to ease its policy on exports to communist countries sufficiently to grant the necessary approval.

The deadline for government approval under the tentative agreement was initially June 25, but the date had been extended to September 15.

In a terse message to Soviet officials yesterday, Mack said, “Since approval from the U.S. government has not been received and the second extension....expired with the close of business today, we feel that to our mutual interest.....to consider said protocol terminated.”

There has been no official statement from administration sources on the proposed deal.

Defense Secretary Melvin Laird, however, has in the past decried the fact that the Russians are supplying trucks to North Vietnam.

Mack countered the charge with the argument that a final agreement would have stipulated that the trucks be used only for industrial and agricultural purposes within the Soviet Union.

The Kama River plant, about 600 miles east of Moscow, was scheduled to begin production in 1975, with a planned capacity of 150,000 heavy diesel trucks and 100,000 diesel engines annually.

Mack Truck President Zenon C.R. Hansen was unavailable for comment on cancellation of the project.

Summary

The Kama River (KamAZ) truck plant was built.

The project was financed by Chase Manhattan Bank and U.S. government loans.

The modern plant, automated by IBM model 370 computers, was built to produce 150,000 trucks and 250,000 diesel engines annually.

Awarded Contracts:

Principal engineering contractor - Swindell-Dressler Co. (Pittsburgh, PA) - $50 million

C.E. Cast Equipment (Cleveland, OH) - $35 million

Holcroft & Co. (Livonia, MI) - $20 million

Ingersoll-Rand (Rockford, IL) - $20 million

National Engineering Co. (Chicago, IL) - $15 million

Soviet officials inspecting Plant 5C (June 17, 1971).jpg

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Thank you very much!

Tooooooooo interesting for me.

Of course nobody in Soviet Union wanted to speak about that project.

KamAZ plant was built. And works.

And nobody wanted to stain the great achivement of Socializm with any facts of American influence!

I might see Mack trucks on a streets instead of KamAZes...

My God!!!!!

Head in hands....

P.s. That city of Naberezhnle Chelney had a name of Brejnev (for some years after his death and until perestroyka).

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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So, despite the defense department's desire to not supply Russia with Mack trucks, the project went ahead anyway financed by Chase Manhattan Bank and U.S. government loans, and Kamaz was up and running building civilian and military trucks.

Kamaz is huge, producing 45% of the tractors and 70% of the vocational trucks in eastern Europe (MAZ and Ural are the two other major brands).

The company's own engines are all V-8s, 11.76 liters rated from 280 to 440 horsepower, and 12.3 liters up to 460 hp.

Mercedes-Benz has acquired a 15% stake in Kamaz and is beginning to supply some cabs. A ZF-Kamaz joint venture produces transmissions. A Cummins-Kamaz joint venture produced B-series engines.

Mack had never planned to give Kamaz the M123/125 series or any assistance related to military tactical truck design. Rather, just civilian R,U and DM models without all-wheel drive capability.

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I think with the VOLMAC designs a good military truck is impossible. Heck the military group has been around for years and don't think muck has come out of it. It has been a long times since Mack has made a good military truck, I think is was a ten ton 6x6. It was built in good old allentown when Mack was Mack and trucks had durability and could survive a battlefield!!!

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Also I saw pictures of the FRENCH MACK. They say French weapons are they best!!! They have never been used and only dropped once. Maybe the same with their trucks!!! I could tell this has real quality. The hood alignment with the grille seems real good!!! French!!! Does midliner ring a bell, HAHAHA!!!

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Too funny to see KamAZ trucks on here, thank you.

I used to observe them everyday as most construction and local transport.

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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The way Mack went about designing their EH for military service has always impressed me. Other truck manufacturers simply applied olive drab paint to their standard commercial trucks with non-driven front axles. However after some initial deliveries and discussions with the U.S. Army, Mack Trucks took it upon themselves to go the extra yard and militarize the 5-ton rated EH’s cab and front sheetmetal. The result reflected Mack Truck’s usual attention to detail and impressive engineering.

Although intended for use on improved roads rather than tactical off road use, it featured an open type tactical cab with removable canvas roof and fold-down windshield. The tactical front end included a brush guard, straight bumper and military lighting. The Mack EN354, paired with a Mack TR-31 five-speed transmission, was detuned from 121 to 110 horsepower resulting in impressive fuel economy and greater operating range.

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The main reason of invention of open cabs was saving of a shipping space. Because all the trucks vent overseas under Lend-lease.

If we speak about the way that Mack used about military orders there were N-series models those were all clear military.

Plus to it Mack interrupted commercial trucks production from 1942 until 1944.

As about other manufacturers many of them also produced open cabs and all wheel drive. For example great numbered GMC's.

Or Studebacker US-6 that was 6x6 tactical vehicle.

There was military Mack EH (as above) for sale in Australia some weeks ago.

Никогда не бывает слишком много грузовиков! leversole 11.2012

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