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Hydraulic Tire Bead Breaker:


Rob
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I'm wanting to purchase one of these things to use in the shop. Have always used a tire hammer in the past, but after twisting myself up this last time and not able to work on my stuff for going on four months now, I'm going to spend the money to get one of these things. Has anyone used one and are there favorites? As of late I've been hauling tires to the dealer and paying to have them broken down, then remounted after the rims are blasted and repainted. This is only about $18.00 per tire but that is money that could be saved after just a few tires services are performed.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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I'm wanting to purchase one of these things to use in the shop. Have always used a tire hammer in the past, but after twisting myself up this last time and not able to work on my stuff for going on four months now, I'm going to spend the money to get one of these things. Has anyone used one and are there favorites? As of late I've been hauling tires to the dealer and paying to have them broken down, then remounted after the rims are blasted and repainted. This is only about $18.00 per tire but that is money that could be saved after just a few tires services are performed.

Rob

I do my own tires. The tires on the Mack are the easiest...FAR easier than my motorcycle. I just lay the rim down on the ground and walk on the tire sidewall. After one or two trips around the wheel, the bead pops off. A little soap to lube the tire/rim and a pair of 30" curved spoons make short work of dismounting & mounting. Setting the bead is even easier than breaking it. Use a quality tire, and all ya need to do is stand the wheel up and put the air line on the valve stem.

Now, I've never done anything with split rims...so I'm sure there's a few differences.

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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I do my own tires. The tires on the Mack are the easiest...FAR easier than my motorcycle. I just lay the rim down on the ground and walk on the tire sidewall. After one or two trips around the wheel, the bead pops off. A little soap to lube the tire/rim and a pair of 30" curved spoons make short work of dismounting & mounting. Setting the bead is even easier than breaking it. Use a quality tire, and all ya need to do is stand the wheel up and put the air line on the valve stem.

Do you have a cheater tank to seat the beads or do you use the "ether & matches" method?

Now, I've never done anything with split rims...so I'm sure there's a few differences.

You got that right!!!!!!!

There's no exercise program that could even come close to breaking down a 11:00 x 24 that's been on the rim for 30 years with the flap all rusted to the rim, and nothing can match the excitement of airing up a tire on a rim that has a damaged lock ring that you decided to reuse anyway!

.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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Do you have a cheater tank to seat the beads or do you use the "ether & matches" method?

Neither. All I do is stand up the tire, hook the airline up to the valve, and it seats itself. Michelins are good like that. When you start getting cheap on the tires (i.e. company trailer tires :pat: ), they sometimes need a little ether to get 'em to seat.

Ever priced a cheater tank? :blink:

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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Neither. All I do is stand up the tire, hook the airline up to the valve, and it seats itself. Michelins are good like that. When you start getting cheap on the tires (i.e. company trailer tires :pat: ), they sometimes need a little ether to get 'em to seat.

Ever priced a cheater tank? :blink:

I heard that they're 3 or 4 hundred $.

I built my own cheater tank years ago from a truck air tank I had laying around. Cut a hole in it, welded in a 2" pipe nipple, screwed on a ball valve and a 12" long piece of pipe which I squeezed halfway flat at the end, then welded a handle on top of the tank and screwed a schrader valve into one of the unused ports to fill it.

Before I made the tank I used the ether method, but the tank is a lot safer.

.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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I heard that they're 3 or 4 hundred $.

I built my own cheater tank years ago from a truck air tank I had laying around. Cut a hole in it, welded in a 2" pipe nipple, screwed on a ball valve and a 12" long piece of pipe which I squeezed halfway flat at the end, then welded a handle on top of the tank and screwed a schrader valve into one of the unused ports to fill it.

Before I made the tank I used the ether method, but the tank is a lot safer.

.

...but I like playing with fire :chili:

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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I heard that they're 3 or 4 hundred $.

I built my own cheater tank years ago from a truck air tank I had laying around. Cut a hole in it, welded in a 2" pipe nipple, screwed on a ball valve and a 12" long piece of pipe which I squeezed halfway flat at the end, then welded a handle on top of the tank and screwed a schrader valve into one of the unused ports to fill it.

Before I made the tank I used the ether method, but the tank is a lot safer.

.

With the increasing price of steel, I save every usable piece, because I would rather build something out of material that I have on hand. Several years ago, when having come face to face with the task of mounting 8 new drive tires, I made my own tank with all new stuff from the local hardware store. A new 10 gal. tank, a piece of 2 in. black pipe and a new gate valve were about $55. I still remember one of the last times that I used ether. I remember standing with my eyelashes, eyebrows, and all the hair on both forearm's singed off, laughing and saying thank you Jesus, I am still alive and I can still see.

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With the increasing price of steel, I save every usable piece, because I would rather build something out of material that I have on hand. Several years ago, when having come face to face with the task of mounting 8 new drive tires, I made my own tank with all new stuff from the local hardware store. A new 10 gal. tank, a piece of 2 in. black pipe and a new gate valve were about $55. I still remember one of the last times that I used ether. I remember standing with my eyelashes, eyebrows, and all the hair on both forearm's singed off, laughing and saying thank you Jesus, I am still alive and I can still see.

Summin hol ma beer, watch this

.

Saw one of those cheetahs on Ebay for about $250. Could use truck air to fill it. Just have to do the armstrong thing for the nuts

Success is only a stones throw away.................................................................for a Palestinian

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I'm wanting to purchase one of these things to use in the shop. Have always used a tire hammer in the past, but after twisting myself up this last time and not able to work on my stuff for going on four months now, I'm going to spend the money to get one of these things. Has anyone used one and are there favorites? As of late I've been hauling tires to the dealer and paying to have them broken down, then remounted after the rims are blasted and repainted. This is only about $18.00 per tire but that is money that could be saved after just a few tires services are performed.

Rob

I do all my own tires also,but have been to many truck tire shops and never saw a hydraulic bead breaker in use or even in the shop,I would think that if they don't use them there must be a reason,18 bucks for a dismount and remount is a sweet price if I were you I would stick with that and save your back for better things. :rolleyes:

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With the increasing price of steel, I save every usable piece, because I would rather build something out of material that I have on hand. Several years ago, when having come face to face with the task of mounting 8 new drive tires, I made my own tank with all new stuff from the local hardware store. A new 10 gal. tank, a piece of 2 in. black pipe and a new gate valve were about $55. I still remember one of the last times that I used ether. I remember standing with my eyelashes, eyebrows, and all the hair on both forearm's singed off, laughing and saying thank you Jesus, I am still alive and I can still see.

I've singed the hair on my arms more times than I can count...but NEVER while seating a bead with ether. I've even got the hair on my face and head a few times...but again, never while trying to seat a bead with ether. For as much as I've played with fire, it's amazing I don't have more scars than I do...and amazingly enough, the only fire scar I DO have is when I burned off a mosquito bite that was buggin' me. I've had my fingers charred by a mapp gas torch...nearly started my room on fire...been knocked on my ass by a large ball of fire...

Yeah, I've had some fun. The guys I hung out with in school didn't mind fire, either. I remember one buddy laying under his 77 T-bird fixing a leaky fuel tank...fuel running up his arm....lit cigarette hanging out of his mouth.smoke.gif

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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You know what's really fun, watching the tire guys seat tires like these using ether...a LOT of ether.

One of those grenades you've got on your trailer would probly be even more impressive!

.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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One of those grenades you've got on your trailer would probly be even more impressive!

.

Haha. Speaking of that, my dad called me earlier this evening asking me..."what the hell is that on your truck in that picture?!.."

Ever wonder how a blind person knows when to stop wiping?

gallery_1977_876_21691.jpg

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I haven't changed a truck tire since 1977. And for $18 a tire, there's no point in doing them yourself.

Sure there is...the 25 mile drive to the shop (on duty in the log book, no less) at 6 or so mpg, then it takes them just as much time to do the job as I could have done it myself...and then the 25 mile drive back...and I have to be there during their business hours...M-F 8 AM to 5 PM, and Sat 8 AM to noon. So, I'd either have to lose a load or two during the week (which adds to the cost of having someone else mess with the tires), or I can't run my errands when places I need to go are open because I'm sitting at the tire shop (again, a cost of having someone else do the work).

It's much easier (and cheaper) for me to run the miles in my 25 mpg beater truck to go get the tires (off duty)...then change 'em myself when I have time right here at the house when it is convenient for me to do it.

When approaching a 4-way stop, the vehicle with the biggest tires has the right of way!
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I haven't changed a truck tire since 1977. And for $18 a tire, there's no point in doing them yourself.

I don't know what retail pricing for the service costs. It's like Rowdy states and all about time, and travel mileage.

These pneumatic over hydraulic breakers are slick and take about 30-45 seconds to break the beads. The hardest part is setting them up to clamp the rim and that takes about 15 seconds per unit. I had 10 10.00X22 rims to break down last year and after four tire guys wore their asses out on two of them, they got the hydraulics off a service truck. The other eight were off the rims in less time than the first two.

Once the beads are broke, dismount and mount is not much of a problem.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Sure there is...the 25 mile drive to the shop (on duty in the log book, no less) at 6 or so mpg, then it takes them just as much time to do the job as I could have done it myself...and then the 25 mile drive back...and I have to be there during their business hours...M-F 8 AM to 5 PM, and Sat 8 AM to noon. So, I'd either have to lose a load or two during the week (which adds to the cost of having someone else mess with the tires), or I can't run my errands when places I need to go are open because I'm sitting at the tire shop (again, a cost of having someone else do the work).

It's much easier (and cheaper) for me to run the miles in my 25 mpg beater truck to go get the tires (off duty)...then change 'em myself when I have time right here at the house when it is convenient for me to do it.

Around here it is currently over $20.00 for a dismount/mount.

I always did my own tire changes & flat repairs when I was self employed, for much the same reasons stated above.

Since I've been working for my current employer and I still have all my tire tools, I've been doing all the dismounts/mounts & flat repairs there too, which saves my boss time & money and adds to my job security.

If I mount up 8 drive tires (which would cost over $160.00 if a tire shop did it)there is a considerable savings, not to mention the convenience for my boss to have it done "in house" when needed, with no trips to town or waiting time.

.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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Today after work I took some pics of my homemade tire equipment::

post-261-127292800367_thumb.jpgpost-261-127292806234_thumb.jpgpost-261-127292821727_thumb.jpg

I made that tire hammer from a wood splitting wedge bent over & ground off blunt on the end, and welded to a pipe handle.

I made the "Cheater tank", as previously stated, from a truck air tank with a handle welded on and the large pipe fitting welded into the side of it.

.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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Sure there is...the 25 mile drive to the shop (on duty in the log book, no less) at 6 or so mpg, then it takes them just as much time to do the job as I could have done it myself...and then the 25 mile drive back...and I have to be there during their business hours...M-F 8 AM to 5 PM, and Sat 8 AM to noon. So, I'd either have to lose a load or two during the week (which adds to the cost of having someone else mess with the tires), or I can't run my errands when places I need to go are open because I'm sitting at the tire shop (again, a cost of having someone else do the work).

It's much easier (and cheaper) for me to run the miles in my 25 mpg beater truck to go get the tires (off duty)...then change 'em myself when I have time right here at the house when it is convenient for me to do it.

I guess I'm fortunate (maybe spoiled) to have a good service center at the truck stop nearby. They're 24/7 and are more than willing to do about anything except overhaul a motor. They're on par with everyone else around here price-wise. The 24 hour thing sold me on it though. We've dealt with the 9-5 tire shops and have gotten fed up, much for the same reasons as you state...PLUS the one guy getting pissed off when my brother called for a blowout on the highway 5 miles from his shop at 3:55 in the afternoon, closing time you know.

Buuuuuuuuuuuuuuut...most of the time I'll have them change the tires. If it's a flat or one or two tires to change then I'll do it but I usually buy all 8 drive or trailer tires at once (who the f wants to do that at one time). I'll keep the good one or two tires for spares, they buy the remaining casings for usually $50-75/tire so that takes care of the mount/dismount and disposal (they don't like tire fires anymore).

Ever wonder how a blind person knows when to stop wiping?

gallery_1977_876_21691.jpg

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What Rob is talking about is a bead breaker for the multi-piece rims (tube type tires). Tires that havent been apart in a while can be tough, but once the rims have been blasted and painted they mount and dismount fairly easy with tire tools. The power machines work well for dismount especialy if they are rusted, but to mount them they have to laying on the ground. I have seen rims that have been on the power machine several times and what happens is to grab the rim base there is a linkage that expands with three little cup points that bite into the rim to hold and turn it, well they make small dents in the rim and chip the paint.

I do all my tires myself except balancing. To change a tubless tire is 1/10th work of a tube type, but I still run a lot of them. I made my bead blaster from a 30# propane tank. To dismount a tube type, a venturi to suck the air out and a rim stand make the job easy.

FW

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