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Transfer Dumps:


Rob
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Since my RL797L was a transfer all it's working life and I've never seen one before I did a little researching. If I can get the YouTube video to work there are a few available to watch.

The operation of these sure seems cumbersome to me and would be better served with a single end dump trailer. I get the gist of "only in California".

What do you guys think, or if you've ever operated one of these setups, what are the pros and cons?

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Since my RL797L was a transfer all it's working life and I've never seen one before I did a little researching. If I can get the YouTube video to work there are a few available to watch.

The operation of these sure seems cumbersome to me and would be better served with a single end dump trailer. I get the gist of "only in California".

What do you guys think, or if you've ever operated one of these setups, what are the pros and cons?

Rob

I could never figure out the reason or logic myslf. Looks too much like a pain in the southern parts of my anatomy,find a place to park the trailer that is acessable by your truck but not in the way while you're dumping,no thanks. An end dump or walking floor would be more efficient. They worry about bridge weights.

#1 on A-model registry

If I drink because of work, why can't I drink at work?

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After watching this video, I can now say that I know more than I ever wanted to know about transfer dumps. As far as stock piling aggregates, or sand, it is hard for me to see an apparent advantage over a dump plus a pup. or a long end dump. Dump trucking has always been about moving material, cost effectively. The added cost of such a rig plus the added maintenance, is just not called for in N. Ga. With an abundance of blue Granite, we have quarry's everywhere, and an asphalt plant nearby. Yes they do things differently when you have reached the fruited plains. Sometimes quite differently.

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The main advantage of using a transfer is maneuverability when dumping on jobsites and tight areas since you only have to back in a single truck instead of a truck+trailer.

Some places out west they'll pull 2 trailers. I can see the advantage, if you had a fairly long ways to haul and a good place "on site" to drop the trailer, but on a short haul, or if you had to drop the trailer a long ways away then drive through traffic to get to a jobsite, then that's a horse of a different hue. :lol:

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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And there is also the plus of hauling two different materials at the same time. The driver that i talked to said it was all about get in were a trailer cant so i would sayt their rates should be some more higher than ours.

I hadn't even thought about that, good point- you could have the pinto beans and ham on one and the cornbread on the other one.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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I hadn't even thought about that, good point- you could have the pinto beans and ham on one and the cornbread on the other one.

I could be wrong and prolly am but really don't think there is a lot of money in hauling that type of commodity. Besides that; It may be difficult to find drivers that want to drive into such a gaseous atmosphere for work. Of course on the flip side that may just elevate the rates??

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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And there is also the plus of hauling two different materials at the same time. The driver that i talked to said it was all about get in were a trailer cant so i would sayt their rates should be some more higher than ours.

Couldn't that be accomplished with a dump trailer that had a second end gate mounted amidship? I don't know for sure but it seems about the same capacity could be loaded into a double compartment dump trailer as two separate dump boxes on separate vehicles.

I can see the manuverability issue in some cases but it has never been needed in this area that I know of.

It just really seems like a lot of extra time and expense for equipment that needs to pay for itself. The video showed the transfers working on a hard, flat surface and there appeared to be plenty of room for a dump trailer to operate so maybe this is a bad example to judge by.

Around here there is an outfit that pulls pup dump trailers constantly but they do not transfer the box at all. They turn the trailer 90 degrees to the truck, dump the trailer, then either pull out and align to dump the truck in the same spot, or dump the truck right there. They then drive off and with the trailer at 90 degrees it hardly runs over the pile at all. A loader then pushes the pile together. This is very quick in operation. I've watched this operation of dumping into a hopper for a conveyor and an experienced operator in the saddle takes no more time than a pair of single dump trucks to discharge.

Watching that video just showed an amount of lost productivity that I would be unwilling to pay for unless mandated compared to other methods. If this were the case, I would base rates appropriately.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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I could be wrong and prolly am but really don't think there is a lot of money in hauling that type of commodity. Besides that; It may be difficult to find drivers that want to drive into such a gaseous atmosphere for work. Of course on the flip side that may just elevate the rates??

Rob

True, pinto beans and cornbread wouldn't be a money maker but they'd be a big hit at the company picnic.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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Rob Said:

If this were the case, I would base rates appropriately.

Trouble is, in the wonderful world of trucking if you set your rate at a level where you can actually make a profit, there's always several others vying for the same work that will undercut you.

So, you can either:

1) Hold out for your rate and hope you get some work anyway.

2) Match your competitor's rates, only to watch them undercut you even further (this usually leads to a real downward spiral in rates as everyone starts cutting each other's throat).

3) Say the hell with it and sell all your stuff before you go bankrupt.

.

"If You Can't Shift It Smoothly, You Shouldn't Be Driving It"

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Rob Said:

Trouble is, in the wonderful world of trucking if you set your rate at a level where you can actually make a profit, there's always several others vying for the same work that will undercut you.

So, you can either:

1) Hold out for your rate and hope you get some work anyway.

2) Match your competitor's rates, only to watch them undercut you even further (this usually leads to a real downward spiral in rates as everyone starts cutting each other's throat).

3) Say the hell with it and sell all your stuff before you go bankrupt.

.

Yup. That is exactly what I did in the towing business at the shop; Exited the market segment. There are STILL outfits around here that will tow a car for $35.00. I wouldn't run a $60,000 truck and lose money by working it. Of course all my eggs are not in one basket neither. I sold the unit, (Mack CS-300 w/22' steel rollback) and have never looked back, (from business perspective).

Out of sheer convienience, I may build another on an R model chassis for private usage. It sure was handy to have around.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Rob Said:

Trouble is, in the wonderful world of trucking if you set your rate at a level where you can actually make a profit, there's always several others vying for the same work that will undercut you.

So, you can either:

1) Hold out for your rate and hope you get some work anyway.

2) Match your competitor's rates, only to watch them undercut you even further (this usually leads to a real downward spiral in rates as everyone starts cutting each other's throat).

3) Say the hell with it and sell all your stuff before you go bankrupt.

.

Welcome to the road transport industry........ Fun isn't it........

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That is almost exactly the way I've seen it done although never by turning a trailer 180 degrees.

Sure is a lot faster than the transfer dump method.

Was that a publicity shot/video, or was it a real operation? The danger of banging up very nice equipment is a reality when operating in such close proximity to fixed obstacles and all the equipment looked new, or really close to new.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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That is almost exactly the way I've seen it done although never by turning a trailer 180 degrees.

Sure is a lot faster than the transfer dump method.

Was that a publicity shot/video, or was it a real operation? The danger of banging up very nice equipment is a reality when operating in such close proximity to fixed obstacles and all the equipment looked new, or really close to new.

Rob

Rob That is the way they do it all the time, every day. all day. Takes a bit of practice....... Mark

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That driver is f'in good!!!!!!!!!

.

Yes they are. If that is not a demo tape of sorts the driver has a lot of pride in his machinery and it shows. I would think someone that competent with their equipment would command a respectable premium for their service also.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

nice load of coal there!

The truck had just left the septic sludge pit for the town I live in. Stunk to "High Heaven". People still talk about it.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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