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1968 Brockway N360 Power Steering Upgrade


oldspwr
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Hi Paul... I have CB's in all my Brockways but really don't hear much on them these days...

Ok it’s time for another update!

Another thing on my list of ‘things to do’ was fix the Fuel Level gauge.  I had filled the tanks up and realized the gauge still read empty.  Brockway used Stewart Warner gauges which in turn meant they also used Stewart Warner fuel sending units.  These units are rated at 240 ohms empty, 33 ohms full.  To start, I disconnected the wire on the sending unit and then checked the resistance with a multimeter.  I had infinite resistance so I determined the sending unit was bad.  I also checked the continuity between wire on the sending unit and the back of the gauge just to make sure it wasn’t a wiring issue either.  I wound up buying a new Stewart Warner sending unit from Summit Racing for $30, part number SWW-100438...

Here are some pics of the new one with the old one...

NzCriu.jpg

And then I found this!  It looks like besides the rheostat part going bad, the float spent a lot of time sitting on the bottom of the tank!!!

FsWan6.jpg

The screws were a little challenging to get out so I cleaned the holes with a 10-32 tap (with some grease to prevent the stuff from falling in the fuel) and then installed the new sending unit with some new screws...

GzoSMC.jpg

Another thing I decided to work on was the air intake tubing from the Farr to the turbo.  There was some overspray on the 5.5” metal section and the rubber pieces as well...  

qK0QRq.jpg

The first thing I did remove everything and add some rubber edge molding to the hole.  I usually buy this molding from McMaster Carr...

xmeGa6.jpg

More to follow...
 

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When I last left off I had just finished working on the air inlet piping from the air filter to the turbo.   I had decided not to install the drag link or pitman arm until the truck was just about ready to be driven because without these items it allowed me to get closer to the motor.  But since I was 99% done with everything I decided to install them.

rSR9cJ.jpg

After I installed them I realized the drag link between the steering arm and the pitman are was not even close to being parallel with the frame.  The pitman arm still had to get pressed on at least another 1/4" but even with that I wasn’t close.  I crawled under my Dad’s 361 and that drag link was fairly parallel to the frame but it also had a ‘job’ in it.  At that point I remembered that Russ had given me a 1/2" spacer with a Sheppard box. 

QKr62i.jpg

I did have some room between the steering box and the radiator so I decided to install it.  Instead of removing everything, I cut the spacer in half and then installed one half at a time.  In the meantime I stopped to check out the progress on Paul Polcha’s 761 and his setup looked very similar to mine so I was comfortable with installed the pitman arm on the rest of the way...

2M3OVJ.jpg

After I was done moving the steering box, connecting the drag link to the steering arm and adjusting the ball and socket spring end, I slid the steering shaft on.  Once I did I realized that all the U joints were very tired and the bearing at the bottom of the fire wall was tight.  For some reason I completely forgot about these.  Fortunately Napa has the U joints in stock (part number UP861 or Neapco 1-1475)...

After I disassembled the shaft I realized the u joint cups were spinning in one of the joint ends (the yellow one) but I was able a better one in my collection...

sKitIU.jpg

The other bearing I mentioned is located at the bottom of the firewall where the steering shaft goes through.  These are the parts that hold it in place...

OCcDI7.jpg

This bearing is held in place with a lock collar and set screw, just like the shafts on my snowmobiles.  This bearing is a Fafnir RA100RRB and it comes with the lock collar...

SVtOwQ.jpg

I wound up sandblasting all the parts, giving them a coat of black paint and reassembled everything.  

More to follow...
 

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Haha I would have been afraid to change those oil pump parts I would have just changed the pump lol also CB radio I still run one most days I travel 530 miles and hear absolutely nothing… bob

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for everyones comments, I appreciate them!!!

When we last left off I resolved the oil pressure issue I had.  One of the things I noticed with this truck was that it was very difficult to drive smoothly.  In other words when leaving from a dead stop, it seemed as if you either gave it too much throttle or not enough, and when you had it moving it was surging.  I met Dave Crump at Macungie and he explained that my problem was common to the earlier Cummins PT pumps. 

This was the pump that was originally on the engine...

vqZwlm.jpg

After a few more discussions I sent him my PT pump and he wound up sending me back a later AFC style pump.  He set it up for an NH280 which was the highest horsepower non piston cooled Cummins (I believe...)  And this is the later style pump he sent me...

djZj9H.jpg

To install the newer pump I had to pipe in an additional fuel return line and use a short extension to feed the fuel line that runs to the rear of the block.  I also had to relocate the air intake that went from the air intake manifold to the air compressor since it now interfered with the tach drive cable.  While waiting to get the pump back I also replaced all the fuel lines with new push to lock lines...

SPiNVX.jpg

And I also drained the fuel tanks and cleaned the fittings and valves...

yOvCKf.jpg

Once all of the lines were on as well as the new pump, I filled and reinstalled a new fuel filter and topped off the injection pump.  I really struggled with getting the truck to run and had no throttle response as well.  Turns out I still had a ton of air in the system.  To help bleed all the air out, I took an old fuel cap that had a busted lead plug in it, drilled and tapped if to 1/4" NPT and installed an air compressor fitting. 

PfURqy.jpg

I then removed the pipe plug from the top of the PT pump and used a valve I put together to air the trucks up...

GdEebQ.jpg

More to follow...
 

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On 10/1/2021 at 10:41 AM, oldspwr said:

When I last left off I had just finished working on the air inlet piping from the air filter to the turbo.   I had decided not to install the drag link or pitman arm until the truck was just about ready to be driven because without these items it allowed me to get closer to the motor.  But since I was 99% done with everything I decided to install them.

rSR9cJ.jpg

After I installed them I realized the drag link between the steering arm and the pitman are was not even close to being parallel with the frame.  The pitman arm still had to get pressed on at least another 1/4" but even with that I wasn’t close.  I crawled under my Dad’s 361 and that drag link was fairly parallel to the frame but it also had a ‘job’ in it.  At that point I remembered that Russ had given me a 1/2" spacer with a Sheppard box. 

QKr62i.jpg

I did have some room between the steering box and the radiator so I decided to install it.  Instead of removing everything, I cut the spacer in half and then installed one half at a time.  In the meantime I stopped to check out the progress on Paul Polcha’s 761 and his setup looked very similar to mine so I was comfortable with installed the pitman arm on the rest of the way...

2M3OVJ.jpg

After I was done moving the steering box, connecting the drag link to the steering arm and adjusting the ball and socket spring end, I slid the steering shaft on.  Once I did I realized that all the U joints were very tired and the bearing at the bottom of the fire wall was tight.  For some reason I completely forgot about these.  Fortunately Napa has the U joints in stock (part number UP861 or Neapco 1-1475)...

After I disassembled the shaft I realized the u joint cups were spinning in one of the joint ends (the yellow one) but I was able a better one in my collection...

sKitIU.jpg

The other bearing I mentioned is located at the bottom of the firewall where the steering shaft goes through.  These are the parts that hold it in place...

OCcDI7.jpg

This bearing is held in place with a lock collar and set screw, just like the shafts on my snowmobiles.  This bearing is a Fafnir RA100RRB and it comes with the lock collar...

SVtOwQ.jpg

I wound up sandblasting all the parts, giving them a coat of black paint and reassembled everything.  

More to follow...
 

The lock collar should be tightened in the direction of rotation. But the steering shaft rotates both ways! So how do you tighten it? 

At the RPMs of a steering shaft it probably doesn't matter!

 

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8 hours ago, oldspwr said:

The lock ring just holds the inner race of the bearing in place.  There is a set screw that tightens up against the shaft.

I know on the round hay baler last year I re raced the rollers and the new bearings turned up and the collar was almost egg shaped on the inside, the bearing had a similar egg shaped shoulder and depending which way the bearing was going to rotate I was meant to rotate the collar the opposite way and lock it to the shaft

Well it all got to much for my brain so I just center punched the shaft and loctited them on there 

I'm not sure when bearing design changed from 2 grub screws to this collar business to hold the bearing in place but to my way of thinking it has made the show a lot more unreliable 

 

Great work on the truck

 

How soon to the end of Brockway using their own cab was this truck, I know little about Brockways so have no idea of dates at all

 

Paul 

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15 hours ago, oldspwr said:

The lock ring just holds the inner race of the bearing in place.  There is a set screw that tightens up against the shaft.

If the lock ring is not tightened in the correct direction, the inner race can back off leaving it loose on the shaft. Of course, that cannot be done when the shaft turns both ways.

There are bearings with an extended race that have 2 set screws in the race that would work in an application of turning both ways. On a steering shaft I don't think the eccentric type will be a problem.

 

Edited by Phase 1
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From what I have found, the lock collar type costs more and takes longer to assemble in production, but it is stronger. The one piece assembly will move out of place easier. Plus it is said that when the screws are tightened in the one piece, they will jack the race out of round.

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On 10/13/2021 at 3:10 PM, mrsmackpaul said:

How soon to the end of Brockway using their own cab was this truck, I know little about Brockways so have no idea of dates at all

 

Paul 

I will follow up a little later on Brockway cabs, etc...

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Tom, A topic on Brockway cabs will be interesting.. When did the Brockway design engineering department combine with the Mack one??? I know Brockway used the F model cab long before they used the R model cab.. And Mack only used the Huskiteer cab in Australia..

Brocky

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