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Aluminum cab F-250,350


Red Horse
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Just read a USA Today online piece that Ford's Kentucky Truck Plant, home of the Super Duty and built for the Louisville production in1969, would convert 250, 350 production to new aluminum cab in next year or so. NO mention was made of 450, 550.

Does this mean they would still build a steel cab 450, 550 at KTP or do you read between the lines and assume 450, 550 moves to the Avon Lake plant (OHAP) where the new 650, 750 will be built starting this year? And does this make the case for an eventual all new medium cab to accomodate 450-750 and the return into "Baby 8's"?

How about it KSC, you always have global insights into this stuff?

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IIRC. Ford has officially denied they'll be an aluminum cab Super Duty. However, that could be just a diversion... Also, Ford has built a 3/4 ton F250 with the 1/2 ton cab before while building a 3/4 ton with the Super Duty cab at the same time. So perhaps they'll just put the aluminum cab from the F150 on 3/4 and 1 ton chassis?

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IIRC. Ford has officially denied they'll be an aluminum cab Super Duty. However, that could be just a diversion... Also, Ford has built a 3/4 ton F250 with the 1/2 ton cab before while building a 3/4 ton with the Super Duty cab at the same time. So perhaps they'll just put the aluminum cab from the F150 on 3/4 and 1 ton chassis?

No the article was based on a Ford press release. Now what you are suggesting (use 150 cab for 250-350) makes a ton of sense to me-like the old days) but for some reason even though the interior dimensions between 150 and Super duty are very close, they seem to think they need a unique cab. And if they did use the 150 cab,you asre correct-they still could crank out steel SD cabs for 450-550 assembly at KTP while they ship same cab components to OHAP for 650-750

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Just read a USA Today online piece that Ford's Kentucky Truck Plant, home of the Super Duty and built for the Louisville production in1969, would convert 250, 350 production to new aluminum cab in next year or so. NO mention was made of 450, 550.

Does this mean they would still build a steel cab 450, 550 at KTP or do you read between the lines and assume 450, 550 moves to the Avon Lake plant (OHAP) where the new 650, 750 will be built starting this year? And does this make the case for an eventual all new medium cab to accomodate 450-750 and the return into "Baby 8's"?

How about it KSC, you always have global insights into this stuff?

In a move to cut costs, the F-150 and Super-Duty range will be using the same cab (per Raj Nair).

Do I feel a pickup cab is ideal for medium truck? No.

No longer serious about the US market medium truck segment, Ford is only willing to build a compromise truck utilizing a pickup truck cab, engine and transmission. Back in the day, that was okay. But in the year 2015, most participants recognize that the requirements of an optiized medium truck design are night and day apart from both light and heavy trucks. Take for example the DAF LF (aka Kenworth K270/K370 and Peterbilt 210/220). That is a purpose designed medium truck that will operate with cutting edge efficiency, comfort, economy and maneuverability for many years.

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You're quite correct, a real truck cab needs enough headroom for a tall driver on a suspension seat and tall enough side windows to allow the driver to see all of the west coast and convex mirrors. The dashboard needs space for switches and gauges for stuff a pickup don't even have. Ford would be smart to build a separate cab for the medium and heavy trucks and let the country club pickup "truckers" have their glitzy F150s.

That would cost more $$$ though, as Ford and most everyone else is looking for enough volume to keep the cab assembly line busy building a couple hundred thousand units a year. Thus Ford will probably cheap out and build a compromised new medium/heavy truck and count on the "low bid" buyers to keep their assembly lines busy and mass produced components like the Powerstroke and Super Duty cab to keep costs down and profits up.

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You're quite correct, a real truck cab needs enough headroom for a tall driver on a suspension seat and tall enough side windows to allow the driver to see all of the west coast and convex mirrors. The dashboard needs space for switches and gauges for stuff a pickup don't even have. Ford would be smart to build a separate cab for the medium and heavy trucks and let the country club pickup "truckers" have their glitzy F150s.

I can vouch for that. We have 750's at work and the cab was not meant to have an air suspension seat. I'm 5'8" and when the seat has the proper amount of air my head is only about 2" from the ceiling. All's well until you hit that first bump and jamb your neck. Also, the parking brake valve is in an awkward location at the bottom of the dashboard, behind the shifter. There are no practical locations for it. If Ford wants to use one cab for all light and medium duty trucks then why not design a medium duty cab that can be used on a 1/2 pickup as well?

Jim

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In a move to cut costs, the F-150 and Super-Duty range will be using the same cab (per Raj Nair).

Do I feel a pickup cab is ideal for medium truck? No.

No longer serious about the US market medium truck segment, Ford is only willing to build a compromise truck utilizing a pickup truck cab, engine and transmission. Back in the day, that was okay. But in the year 2015, most participants recognize that the requirements of an optiized medium truck design are night and day apart from both light and heavy trucks. Take for example the DAF LF (aka Kenworth K270/K370 and Peterbilt 210/220). That is a purpose designed medium truck that will operate with cutting edge efficiency, comfort, economy and maneuverability for many years.

RE your comments on the Paccar cabovers, so how would the Cargo variants stack up against those?

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I dont think a F150, F250 or a F350 or a F450 is a medium truck from a practical standpoint, the F series truck cabs are already large and offer plenty of room. I do agree that once seat suspension change, additional gauges and switches ect.. are installed a new cab needs to be developed with more head room. The the GM medium duty's cabs from the mid 90s on are the worst. You bump your head just getting into the stupid thing.

Robert

"I reject your reality and substitute my own."

 

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RE your comments on the Paccar cabovers, so how would the Cargo variants stack up against those?

The current Cargo cab was introduced in 2003. In 2013, an updated Cargo (and cab) was introduced (under the Ford Global Cargo Truck Program headed by chief engineer John Sidelko).

If Ford wanted to do so, the company could marry the Cargo cab to the current F-650/750 platform and create a much more serious entry in the medium truck segment. However, Ford is not serious about the North American medium truck market.

Though logical, it isn't practical for Ford US to import complete Ford Otosan Cargo medium trucks from Turkey on account of our protectionist 25 percent import tariff on imported trucks (Lyndon Johnson's 1964 Proclamation 3564, i.e. the chicken tax).

Ford imports Transit Connects to the US market from Ford Otosan with passenger seats installed, claiming it as a car. Ford then removes the seats for shipment back to Turkey to be installed again, to get around the 25% truck tax. Apparently if you know a few people in congress, you can cheat the system in public view.

With the majority of medium and heavy trucks on America's roads today produced by foreign truckmakers, it's clear that the chicken tax is not serving any useful purpose. If anything, it's working against US vehicle makers like Ford.

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The current Cargo cab was introduced in 2003. In 2013, an updated Cargo (and cab) was introduced (under the Ford Global Cargo Truck Program headed by chief engineer John Sidelko).

If Ford wanted to do so, the company could marry the Cargo cab to the current F-650/750 platform and create a much more serious entry in the medium truck segment. However, Ford is not serious about the North American medium truck market.

Though logical, it isn't practical for Ford US to import complete Ford Otosan Cargo medium trucks from Turkey on account of our protectionist 25 percent import tariff on imported trucks (Lyndon Johnson's 1964 Proclamation 3564, i.e. the chicken tax).

Ford imports Transit Connects to the US market from Ford Otosan with passenger seats installed, claiming it as a car. Ford then removes the seats for shipment back to Turkey to be installed again, to get around the 25% truck tax. Apparently if you know a few people in congress, you can cheat the system in public view.

With the majority of medium and heavy trucks on America's roads today produced by foreign truckmakers, it's clear that the chicken tax is not serving any useful purpose. If anything, it's working against US vehicle makers like Ford.

Thx for the comment. As always informative. Where does John Sidelko hang his hat?

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I wonder how much of the change to the Aluminum cab is for the coming new CAFE standards from light trucks/SUV's ?

"OPERTUNITY IS MISSED BY MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE IT IS DRESSED IN OVERALLS AND LOOKS LIKE WORK"  Thomas Edison

 “Life’s journey is not to arrive at the grave safely, in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting ‘Holy shit, what a ride!’

P.T.CHESHIRE

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