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Along The Lines Of Air Brakes:


Rob
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I'm to the point of needing to purchase valving for operation of brakes on all corners. This B67 never had spring brakes as most B series trucks do not and I'm installing spring parking brakes on both rear axles. The truck does have steer axle brakes also.

What valves, and plumbing am I going to need to acquire to make this function properly? I'm planning to run all new plastic/nylon lines, but will probably adapt to some of the existing copper if it is sound.

Thanks,

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Hi Rob

I have been going thru the RS the last few years replacing valves and such, I am not an expert at this and still learning... if the truck does not have spring brakes the hardest part will be plumbing in the dash valves to anti componding valves and makeing sure it works as intended. I still cant figure out where all the hoses end up with all the tee fittings and such coming off the valves. I replaced my foot valve last night and it had about 12 lines coming off of it. looking at the bendix air brake handbook it says i only should have 6? the reason I had so many hoses is that Mack put the 2 stop light switchs on the foot valves,and the anti compounding valve was tied into it. It was way to messy in my opinion. had to remove 3 fittings to get at one and it was just a puzzle trying to put the nev valve in. I would suggest remote mounting any other valves away fromt the foot valve and to a location on the fire wall or in a place that has more space to access all the air lines. just for simplicity reasons when changing out a valve.

with the newer air brake parts I noticed Bendix offers dash valve assy that take alot of the air hose mess out of it./ they also have tractor protection valves with built in brake light switches. some of these items will save you from having a mess of extra air lines..

I think the simple way to approach this is to start at the cab and see what you will need there as all air lines enter and leave this aera. you will see real fast that air lines will end up all over the place and you may even need a new air tank for the parking system. Its a nightmare LOL

:banana:

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I believe i'll follow Trents suggestion also since i'll have to do the same to mine. I just now have no more air leaks ( KNOCK ON WOOD ) The new pop off valve was letting too much air out and for some reason is behaving nicely at this time. Strange thing the dash air valve has to be flipped to the right to get the air to fill up past 60 lbs. It now has 130lbs. and I was not expecting that much air since I put on a new D-2 Governor recently.

mike

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I believe i'll follow Trents suggestion also since i'll have to do the same to mine. I just now have no more air leaks ( KNOCK ON WOOD ) The new pop off valve was letting too much air out and for some reason is behaving nicely at this time. Strange thing the dash air valve has to be flipped to the right to get the air to fill up past 60 lbs. It now has 130lbs. and I was not expecting that much air since I put on a new D-2 Governor recently.

mike

Its like mine. i have all these valves, where the neck do they all go? how does it get plumbed? so far tho only air diagrams i have seen dont go into detail to where it all goes. its like a jigsaw puzzle with no picture to put it together.

Grant

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Well, mine is relatively simple even with maxi's. I did have to reattach the front lines as they had been disconnect many years ago. I found the front limiter valve and plumbed a new line from the treadle to it. Works fine.

Once I start putting the air ride on, removing the stock air tank in the rear and putting new ones on hanging on the side of frame and such I'm sure I'll have to watch my P's and Q's.

Seems I used to have a simple air line diagram(from maybe Bendix?) that would be a simple way to plumb things. I know you can really get in deep with double systems, relay valves, quick releases, blah, blah, blah.

IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

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I think that for spring brakes, the hook-up is the easiest

Some to the other valves are much meaner to plumb!!

1) Run a line from the air tank to the park brake valve.

2) From the park valve to a quick-release valve.

3) Tee the Quick-release valve to the outer (spring) chambers.

4) You're done!!

The park brake is a stand-alone valve and should not be hooked to any other systems.

It should operate with-out any other accessories or air equipment attached.

If the pressure drops and sets the brakes, you want to know that there was nothing in the park brake system to drain down the air.

When installed, there will be a check valve in the air intake to the tank.

Again to keep air in the park brake system to get the truck off the road.

Using shop air, the park (yellow) valve, then the quick release valve, then the spring brake cans, you can set the system up at the back of the truck or on the bench, and make sure every thing works before bolting it in.

Packer

Keep a clutchin'

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Rob,

The process of retro-fitting new plastic lines and spring brakes is much simpler, and more economical, than you might think.

You already know about the Bendix product catalog with the schematics for various types of brake layouts, including your intended tandem axle spring brake set-up. Every valve and switch is listed by part number. These valves are all available online from legitimate vendors; or from E-Bay, if you want to take chances. The Bendix products are all counterfeited by miscellaneous Chinese imposters and Mexican cheapos too. Be real careful.

In the B-67 we are finishing now, I spec'd all genuine Bendix parts from the vendors I asked to bid the job. Fleetpride got the job. And I was very happy with the parts, all of the brass fittings and the level of service we received. I believe that the key is actually specifying genuine Bendix parts, or Haldex or whomever you deem as satisfactory. While we were at it, we installed a complete new dual, redundant air system, just like you would get on a brand new truck. It might be overkill - you have to decide that.

All in all, including the air dryer, air tanks, all fittings, governor, all valves and lines - the bill was something like $1,300.00. I shopped hard, and I went back to Fleetpride with the lowest price that met the qualifications, and they matched it. I'm happy, they are happy, and --- it doesn't say China anywhere on my truck. Very important to me!

Now the truck is really useable on today's highways, on a regular basis with no fear of system failure or a rogue DOT inspection that might put an old truck on the shoulder and awaiting a wrecker.

Just as a message to everyone here:

What Rob is asking here is a very important question - how to make his truck safer and more reliable.

I don't mean to start any trouble, but -

I feel very strongly about the safety and reliability of the trucks that we play with. The whole hobby of keeping old trucks running is highly dependent on our image. One accident or worse, and the image is tarnished. Often we scoff and laugh at the idea of building safe, professional trucks. We think it's unnecessary to spend that kind of money. It has a lot to do with ego. Guys think it's cool to take unnecessary chances. I think that's extremely stupid on our part.

We should present the most professional and enthusiastic picture that we can to the public. Driving unreliable, unsafe or outdated equipment doesn't fit that picture.

And, it's hard enough to steer clear of the law. Why give them an open invitation by trying to get away with anything?

Brakes and steering are probably the two most important systems your truck has. Why not keep them updated and maintained?

Paul Van Scott

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Rob,

The process of retro-fitting new plastic lines and spring brakes is much simpler, and more economical, than you might think.

You already know about the Bendix product catalog with the schematics for various types of brake layouts, including your intended tandem axle spring brake set-up. Every valve and switch is listed by part number. These valves are all available online from legitimate vendors; or from E-Bay, if you want to take chances. The Bendix products are all counterfeited by miscellaneous Chinese imposters and Mexican cheapos too. Be real careful.

In the B-67 we are finishing now, I spec'd all genuine Bendix parts from the vendors I asked to bid the job. Fleetpride got the job. And I was very happy with the parts, all of the brass fittings and the level of service we received. I believe that the key is actually specifying genuine Bendix parts, or Haldex or whomever you deem as satisfactory. While we were at it, we installed a complete new dual, redundant air system, just like you would get on a brand new truck. It might be overkill - you have to decide that.

All in all, including the air dryer, air tanks, all fittings, governor, all valves and lines - the bill was something like $1,300.00. I shopped hard, and I went back to Fleetpride with the lowest price that met the qualifications, and they matched it. I'm happy, they are happy, and --- it doesn't say China anywhere on my truck. Very important to me!

Now the truck is really useable on today's highways, on a regular basis with no fear of system failure or a rogue DOT inspection that might put an old truck on the shoulder and awaiting a wrecker.

Just as a message to everyone here:

What Rob is asking here is a very important question - how to make his truck safer and more reliable.

I don't mean to start any trouble, but -

I feel very strongly about the safety and reliability of the trucks that we play with. The whole hobby of keeping old trucks running is highly dependent on our image. One accident or worse, and the image is tarnished. Often we scoff and laugh at the idea of building safe, professional trucks. We think it's unnecessary to spend that kind of money. It has a lot to do with ego. Guys think it's cool to take unnecessary chances. I think that's extremely stupid on our part.

We should present the most professional and enthusiastic picture that we can to the public. Driving unreliable, unsafe or outdated equipment doesn't fit that picture.

And, it's hard enough to steer clear of the law. Why give them an open invitation by trying to get away with anything?

Brakes and steering are probably the two most important systems your truck has. Why not keep them updated and maintained?

Paul Van Scott

Hi Paul, I agree with your statements. I do plan to use this truck as I really like it, (daughter has her own plans with it however) and without doubt, it must be safe to operate.

I've never dealt with Fleetpride before. If you will forward the contact information of the person you dealt with, I'll swing them some business. I know the stuff I want is expensive to acquire, however it must be purchased. I've never been one to put something off till later cause so little gets finished when it's thought about. Brakes, (especially brakes) are not an area for compromise.

Although if I go to my grave tomorrow I harbor no regrets of the past as I've lived a good life, I certainly don't want to take anyone with me due to careless misjudgements.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

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Hey paul,just read your latest reply to rob concerning air brakes,i was very impressed with the adendum to that post,just my opinion but i think you should re-post that part for everyone to read. It is great to see someone so concerned with the safety aspect of our hobby! I thought about re-posting it myself,but surely don't want to take any un-due credt!.............Mark

Mack Truck literate. Computer illiterate.

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Hey paul,just read your latest reply to rob concerning air brakes,i was very impressed with the adendum to that post,just my opinion but i think you should re-post that part for everyone to read. It is great to see someone so concerned with the safety aspect of our hobby! I thought about re-posting it myself,but surely don't want to take any un-due credt!.............Mark

Hi, this is whay all brakes and steering have been done, i am unsure where all the stuff i have is made, its all come in protec red boxes and they are a big supplier of truck parts down here. the question is how to plumb it, i couldnt find a link on the bendix website on how to plumb the truck.

Grant

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