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Powertrain Offerings for Volkswagen's Constellation Heavy Tractor Expanded


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Launched last fall at the Fenatran international transport exhibition in Sao Paulo, Brazil, MAN Latin America now has a 420 horsepower powerplant option for its Volkswagen Constellation heavy tractors.

19.420 4x2 56-ton GCW

25.420 6x2 56-ton GCW

26.420 6x4 63-ton GCW

Powered by an electronically-controlled 8.9-liter 420 horsepower Cummins ISL with 1,850 N.m (1,364 lb/ft) of torque, the powertrain is paired with a 16-speed ZF AS Tronic AMT (automated manual transmission).

The Euro-5 spec engines utilize SCR (selective catalytic reduction) technology to meet Euro-5 emissions.

The new range of tractors is GCW-rated up to 63 metric tons (138,891 lb).

Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2rGxXLtFt0

19.420 4x2: http://www.man-la.com/images/stories/produtos/caminhao/ficha_tecnica/pdf/16605/Constellation%2019420%20Tractor%20V%20Tronic%20low.pdf

25.420 6x2: http://www.man-la.com/images/stories/produtos/caminhao/ficha_tecnica/pdf/16607/Constellation%2025420%20Tractor%20V%20Tronic%20low.pdf

26.420 6x4: http://www.man-la.com/images/stories/produtos/caminhao/ficha_tecnica/pdf/16609/Constellation%2026420%20Tractor%20V%20Tronic%20low.pdf

http://www.man-la.com/images/stories/library/16335/_MG_5939.jpg

http://hdmagazine.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/MG_5313.jpg

What’s interesting is that the Constellation’s 8.9-liter Cummins ISL is rated at 420hp, which runs into the 10.8-liter ISM’s territory. In Europe, the ISL at Euro-5 is rated from 280 to 400 horsepower (260-380 EPA2010), and the Euro-5 ISM from 350 to 445 horsepower (310-425 EPA2007).

For Brazil, Cummins was willing to bump up the 8.9-liter ISL to 420hp, where overloading is rare. But for China where Cummins was also asked to supply a near 420 horsepower ISL, and where overloading is still widespread, Cummins felt a 400-plus horsepower ISL needed a displacement increase. This resulted in a new 9.5-liter ISL rated from 292 up to 425 horsepower.

Reference:

http://www.bigmacktrucks.com/index.php?/topic/32528-cummins-introduces-new-95-liter-isl-series-engine/

http://www.bigmacktrucks.com/index.php?/topic/30250-volkswagen-light-medium-and-heavy-trucks/

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8.9L? 9.5L? 139,000lb GCW??? What do they do in SA or China that is different than US-Operate only when tailwinds prevail??? :idunno:

Remember, Brazil is running B-trains (known as Interlinks in South Africa and B-doubles in Australia).

And in China, 110,000 to 132,000 pound loads with 6x4 tractors paired with tri-axle trailers is normal. And when you get into the northern mining regions, you'll see ore hauling road trains that gross 375,000 pounds. These trucks never get out of the first three gears.

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Remember, Brazil is running B-trains (known as Interlinks in South Africa and B-doubles in Australia).

And in China, 110,000 to 132,000 pound loads with 6x4 tractors paired with tri-axle trailers is normal. And when you get into the northern mining regions, you'll see ore hauling road trains that gross 375,000 pounds. These trucks never get out of the first three gears.

I hear you-that is what surprises me-No CUBIC INCHES!! Their life cycle must b e very short! By the way-does the VW side profile look an awful lot like a Cargo or is it my imagination? Maybe there is a Budd/Shellar Globe Co. in SA??

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I hear you-that is what surprises me-No CUBIC INCHES!! Their life cycle must b e very short! By the way-does the VW side profile look an awful lot like a Cargo or is it my imagination? Maybe there is a Budd/Shellar Globe Co. in SA??

In Brazil, VW has an impresssive 30 percent market share. While their largest offering there is 8.9 liters, Scania is there with all engine sizes, as is DAF, Ford, Iveco, Mercedes-Benz, Navistar and Volvo. Still the average engine size is 9-11 liters.

In China, 11 liters is now the norm and 12-13 liter engines are selling. In a few years, they'll have 15-liter powerplants.

Remember, you can always get around cubic inches with gears and low (high numerically) axle ratios. The Indian market and China 10+ years ago were classic examples of that.

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I have worked on the ISL and its a horse for its size. Non of the ones we serviced was near that HP cause they were in town trucks. Jake brake makes brake for them but small as the engine is I would think it would not be too much to consider.

In situations like this with smaller displacement engines that would inherently have unacceptably low engine braking performance, I'll spec a ZF transmission with their integrally mounted retarder.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXQPPTvx4Ew

http://www.zf.com/corporate/en/products/product_range/commercial_vehicles/trucks_intarder.shtml

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In Brazil, VW has an impresssive 30 percent market share. While their largest offering there is 8.9 liters, Scania is there with all engine sizes, as is DAF, Ford, Iveco, Mercedes-Benz, Navistar and Volvo. Still the average engine size is 9-11 liters.

In China, 11 liters is now the norm and 12-13 liter engines are selling. In a few years, they'll have 15-liter powerplants.

Remember, you can always get around cubic inches with gears and low (high numerically) axle ratios. The Indian market and China 10+ years ago were classic examples of that.

Agree-truck specing 101-but at those very high GCW's I find it hard to believe that these engines have any kind of life?? they have to be constantly at max RPM. Would the emissions stds in these countries make these engines more durable than what we expect? I can't imagine specing a tractor in this country with 9-11 liters and pulling a set of turnpike doubles from Buffalo to Boston-for any length of time.

Perhaps the 9L Ford Duratorque has a future in Ford's future US plans.

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Agree-truck specing 101-but at those very high GCW's I find it hard to believe that these engines have any kind of life?? they have to be constantly at max RPM. Would the emissions stds in these countries make these engines more durable than what we expect? I can't imagine specing a tractor in this country with 9-11 liters and pulling a set of turnpike doubles from Buffalo to Boston-for any length of time.

Perhaps the 9L Ford Duratorque has a future in Ford's future US plans.

In India, they're still running Cummins B series engines in many heavy trucks. It's a poor market, but still with heavy truck needs. With care, the trucks get the job done.

The China market is maturing at an amazing speed, and overloading is beginning to be controlled. But still, most of the trucks are run hard. Ten plus years ago, the 6-7 liter engines did have short 3 year lives. However the technology level of chinese heavy trucks has ramped up at a staggering rate. Today's 9 to 13 liter engines approach the durability of the global brand heavy truck engines.

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