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front axle floater wheels -keep-em or lose-em?


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We have two tandem dumps. One is an R-model with spoke wheels and the other is a granite with steel buds. now they both have floaters on the front axles ....ok so here's the questions ?

The boss came up with the idea that he would like to eliminate the floaters on both trucks for two reasons, 1. the tires are expensive as all heck. 2.he needs cores for recapping and to use on the rear tandems.

so on the mechanical R-model all axles are spoke wheels with buds, will the rear rims bolt up to the front axle that had previously had floaters,or is there some sort of off set on the floater rim and it shouldn't be a problem?or it will be a problem and what do I need to do?

now on the granite it has aluminum alcoas front wheels with the same floaters. will the steel buds on the rear axles bolt up to the front axle?

Please try to forgive me for even considering this idea (idea not mine) I drive the granite and I am so happy with the additional rating and maneuverability I get with the floaters,I also think it to be sacreligious of sorts to even think of doing any of the above. I just need to know what they are going to be up against if they try. I'm desperately trying to stop this from happening.

y'all drive safe now y'hear

dawg,

its a dirty job why do i like it so much?

and life ain't easy,when your fat and greasy

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I think it depends on what size floats you're running. I may be wrong, but I think a 315 float will go on the same rim as an 11r22.5, but I know a 425 or 445 needs a wider wheel. As for there being any difference in the hub, no, there shouldn't be.

Jake

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Oh yeah there wider then that 488/466 I believe? I wrote it down but my eyes are ready for toothpicks. I git back this weekend see whats else is new. thanks

p.s. as for the hubs that's what i'm afraid of.

Edited by mackdumper

its a dirty job why do i like it so much?

and life ain't easy,when your fat and greasy

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I think years back when I drove a mixer, thay were going to change from the tubless floats over to 11X24's on the front of our A-Cars but there was a weight rating issue that changed the rating of the front axel. Now these were old school 11yd tandem's that had 11x24's on the back with 475 gl over head water tanks so there was a lot of wt over the front and the 11X24 could not meet the weight rating

BULLHUSK

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Whats your weight situation. Also what kind of surface you running. you'll still sink with floats but they help out alot. How often are you changing tires. Yes they are expensive but hows this why not convert the back to floats and just god I hate to say this cap the steers and move them back.

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I think it depends on what size floats you're running. I may be wrong, but I think a 315 float will go on the same rim as an 11r22.5, but I know a 425 or 445 needs a wider wheel. As for there being any difference in the hub, no, there shouldn't be.

I needed some steers a little bit ago, and wanted something a little more narrow than the 425, thought maybe 385's. A bit more wheel cut, same size as my lift axle tires, and he had some herc 385's in his shop,.so I wouldn't have to wait a day for the 425's to come in, but he he told me I would need new rims, as 425 and 385 use different rims.....oh well....turning circle of a house remains.....

As to 11r22.5 steers for off road use, I think they are useless.....true, floaters will sink, but not near as fast as donuts. There's a few roll offs around here than run skinnies up front and while they have a better turning circle, after a good rain at the landfill, the need help to get out.

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Lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part....

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if your running 99% highway and not doing alot of offroad then yeah worth it like delivering to cement plants. but if your going every load off pavement then floats for sure. a 315 has more weight capacity then a 385. but 385's give you more stability on and off road. I run 425's on my tractor only problem I have with getting tires is I run highway tread so it is a pita to find when I need them now. been getting 2 years or so.

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Tandem dump means you are around 55000 lbs gross right? If thats the case, floats arent needed unless the vehicle sees alot of soft offroad use. Since your boss seems to be doing this because he wants casings for the rears... if you wear out a set of 11r24.5 tires every year, he will have to wait 4 years to have enough to recap the drives and by that time the casings that are in storage will be dry rotted lol. Also your boss is saying that the floats are 'expensive as all heck'. I pay around 450 for a good 11r24.5 steer tire and $650 for a 425/65/22.5 float. The floats will last twice as long as the cookie cutters on the steers as long as there is not a huge alignment issue..so actually they are cheaper for the mileage.

If the trucks are dayton/webb/spoke steers and you want to convert to a skinny tire, you have to change the spider and the rim, and sometimes the drum depending on the offset. Also since you are pulling them, add in some wheel seals.

Casings are $80 for fairly new, xrayed and inspected virgins when you buy from the tire retreader. So converting just to make a mill of casings is not wise financially.

Keep the trucks as is. Dont be afraid of Aeolus floats...they last as long as any of the others

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Great replies drivers, my bad on the mixed up numbers I gave jakebrake86 earlier. What I have is Bridgestone 385/65 R22.5 floaters on the front axle which brings the axle rating up from 16,000 to 18,000.

M844 found on the sidewall maybe a model/style number? Which is a nice lugged tread which has lasted for just over 6 years. not bad for an on/off road steer axle tire. My mileage is lower then the trucks that run quarry loads,because I run for the contractor not the quarry, which is his 5/8 loads to my two/four per day. The r-model had to replace one tire and they gave us a Continental highway tread front-runner,which normally I prefer the lugged pattern even on steeraxles but this continental is sweet. looks like it'll last a good long time. We register the tandems at 70,000 gvwr and we're registered with apportioned plates due to the jobs we contract across state lines, which allow tandems to be no more then 56,500, N.Y.S or there abouts and tri-axles are allowed even less. I think it's 52,500 gvw on tri-axles. Surprisingly tractor dump-trailers which in New Jersey are matched accordingly to dump tandems and/or tri-axles are same as trailers. Meaning 70,000, 80,000 with drop axles. Also can be loaded up to 110,000 gross with r/permits in N.Y.C. & 5 boro's`. Correct me if I'm wrong, It's been awhile since I've run demolition out of the rotten apple. Teamsters Local 282 kept me busy with any jersey outfits that needed to get onto city job sites an such. My knees wobble just thinking of hauling anywhere above 80,000 gross. and always being on the lookout for the Port Authority mobile scales so we knew which tunnel to run out of, then you had the Bergen county cops on top of overpasses along rt.3 and 495 as you entered along the meadowlands and such. And in regard to running on/off road, what seems to be the worse is getting in and out of the quarrys without biteing any chunks out of tires and /or puncturing a tire with hidden rebar in the dumps or just passing the 1-1/2 stockpile, hell I've punctured tires on 3/4 clean stone, they're as sharp as arrowheads. So I understand what my bosses are thinking, but being pennywise and dollar foolish versus performance well I know which side i'm on. thanx again for all your replies.

drive safe,

Edited by mackdumper

its a dirty job why do i like it so much?

and life ain't easy,when your fat and greasy

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Floats for sure with what you are describing, you'll lose your front axle weight capacity, I'm thinking around 16,000 for an 11R. Then the tires will wear two to three times as fast since they are maxed out or over weight, then the off road issue of digging in and its just not worth it. Not to mention doubling your tire cutting,puncturing worries since you now have nearly twice the psi on your steer tires.

"Any Society that would give up a little LIBERTY to gain a little SECURITY will Deserve Neither and LOSE BOTH" -Benjamin Franklin

"If your gonna be STUPID, you gotta be TOUGH"

"You cant always get what you want, but if you try sometimes you get what you need"

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16 ply 11R22.5' are in the 6k lb range.

315's are rated for 8k lb

385's are rated for9k lb

425's are rated for 10k lb

check again on the 425's mine are 11400, Conties are the same and so are yokes

http://www.michelintruck.com/michelintruck/tires-retreads/tireInfo.do?tread=XFE%20%28wb%29%20%28Steer%29

11400*2 comes out to 20800lbs

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  • 2 weeks later...

I appreciate all the info in regards to floaters, But Wait a minute as you put mileage on yo odometer sin't floaters those things you get in your eyes but you somehow have to train your brain that they really aren't there ? Oh boy I digress once again.....I got information that I was sorely in need of and I thank you all so very much. Except in this case,I asked a silly question and all I got was some very good replies to my situation. End result being that all I have to do is decide on a heavy duty lugged floatation tire which seems to be best due to the off road situations that I am often found in. which isn't really that extreme. I dig em at the quarrys when foul weather hits, Also winter snow plowing. They are quite reassuring as to my safety. But the shop put one continental ribbed type floater and the other a Bridgestone lugged type on the R-model. Boy they sure give you a good amount of distance between between the cords and the pavement on those continentals, must be an inch@least or more of good rubber tire. keeping any nails from trying to go threw and ruin your day. well ya'all have a great and safe days ahead.

thanks again, I do appreciate the replies

Edited by mackdumper

its a dirty job why do i like it so much?

and life ain't easy,when your fat and greasy

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  • 7 years later...
On 7/25/2013 at 11:06 PM, jakebrake86 said:

I think it depends on what size floats you're running. I may be wrong, but I think a 315 float will go on the same rim as an 11r22.5, but I know a 425 or 445 needs a wider wheel. As for there being any difference in the hub, no, there shouldn't be.

A 315 tire needs a specific 9" wide rim, the 11R (8.25") rim is not the right width and isn't made for the pressure. They will fit on a 8.25" rim, but if you run up on a very, um, 'by the book' trooper or CMV officer, it could be a problem. Plus, your tire guy will hate you, lol.

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