Jump to content

Cab Location Again.


Recommended Posts

Hi, is this cab in correct spot for an R700? the hood seems to come back over the rails slightly.

regards Grant

Hi Grant, I'll snap a couple photos tonight for you and put dimensions along with them. What type of hood hinge arrangement are you using for the opening? Does it use small tie rod ends, or flat hinge plates? I have both at the shop. Do you prefer metric measurements, or inches?

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Grant, I'll snap a couple photos tonight for you and put dimensions along with them. What type of hood hinge arrangement are you using for the opening? Does it use small tie rod ends, or flat hinge plates? I have both at the shop. Do you prefer metric measurements, or inches?

Rob

Hello, i will probably use tie rods, have to make all of it, i have the pics you sent before of cab location, wich is i assume the same bolt holes as what i have used, but whe you go to front of the truck the hood tends to sit over top of the chassis, not in front of it. there is also alot of room behind engine to cab, appeared to be to much?

Grant

post-2194-127470674398_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello, i will probably use tie rods, have to make all of it, i have the pics you sent before of cab location, wich is i assume the same bolt holes as what i have used, but whe you go to front of the truck the hood tends to sit over top of the chassis, not in front of it. there is also alot of room behind engine to cab, appeared to be to much?

Grant

There is quite a bit of room to the cab from the back of the engine in the long hood R models. I will measure from the cab mount to the spring shackle and relay the measurements. I will also measure the length of the frame from the front of frame to the spring shackle mounting holes. Do you want photos of the hinge area for tilting the hood also?

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Grant, I took some measurments this afternoon for you. Because I don't know your units of measure I'm relaying millimeters in distance:

From the rear upper front spring mount hole to the front upper cab mount hole on your driver's side of the truck, (right) equals 1654 millimeters in distance.

From the front upper cab mount to the rear upper spring mount equals 357 millimeters in distance.

From the centerline of the front cab mount pivot, to the rear upper front spring mount equals 1692 millimeters in distance.

All distance measurements are taken from the centerline of the corresponding holes.

I snapped photos but do not have the cable with me to download them. I will post them in the morning to ensure you know where the measurements were taken.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

XXX oversize hey, mmm nothing wrong with XXX :) yes milimtres is fine thanks, will measure today, the holes I have used for cab mount ar as per your pics, just the hood sits over the top of the chassis at front.

this may be correct, but with out a R700 or superliner kicking around here its a bit hard to take a look at another one., plenty of R600s, but no R700s, I have like 20cms at front of cab to turbo on 866 engine.

I see the hood mounts are off the radiator, will avoid that design I think?

thankyou for the measurements.

regards Grant

Link to comment
Share on other sites

XXX oversize hey, mmm nothing wrong with XXX smile.gif yes milimtres is fine thanks, will measure today, the holes I have used for cab mount ar as per your pics, just the hood sits over the top of the chassis at front. this may be correct, but with out a R700 or superliner kicking around here its a bit hard to take a look at another one., plenty of R600s, but no R700s, I have like 20cms at front of cab to turbo on 866 engine. I see the hood mounts are off the radiator, will avoid that design I think? thankyou for the measurements. regards Grant
Hi Grant, the mounts for the hood tilt are off of the radiator side panels which are original and strengthened from other I've seen. Here are a few photos taken this evening that show where the measurements were taken from. You can see the tram gauge used which is calibrated in millimeters, and inches. I have over eight inches clearance from the turbocharger housing to the cab firewall in this installation which is the same as my other RL700 with a V8 Mack engine. Regards, Rob

post-78-127475244052_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475245004_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475246001_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475247027_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475247933_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475248767_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475249574_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475250537_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475251498_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475252415_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475262975_thumb.jpg

post-78-12747526389_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475264888_thumb.jpg

post-78-127475265863_thumb.jpg

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

more......

Hello, thats an interesting measureing stick you have there. they are the same, its in the correct spot., the hood sits above the chassis tho, not in front of it. thought it may be to far back but maybe its not?

thankyou for the pics and info, I now no the cab is correct, so the hood must be ok to.

Grant

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ok, thankyou, do you have any side pics with hood down? am putting cab back on again today, will continue with the exhaust.

Grant

HI Grant, I do not but will stop to the shop before work in the morning and snap a few for you. Which side do you prefer?

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello, thats an interesting measureing stick you have there. they are the same, its in the correct spot., the hood sits above the chassis tho, not in front of it. thought it may be to far back but maybe its not?

thankyou for the pics and info, I now no the cab is correct, so the hood must be ok to.

Grant

The "measuring stick" is a trammel gauge and is calibrated in both metric and inches. I've used that same gauge on automobile and truck frames for about 30 years. Wouldn't be without it. It is quite accurate with differing lengths of pointers to clear obstructions.

Glad to hear the cab is mounted correctly. The hood gap between the back of the hood panel, and the cab front where it breaks over from the horizontal, to vertical plane is about 25 millimeters with the hood closed. Along the sides it is a bit wider and I've not measured the distance.

None of my hoods protrude further than the front edges of the frame rails. I can't say for sure if a 600 series truck differs from a 700 series and I only have a single R700 model with a steel frame. The other two are aluminum frames and use the pivot pin type hinge instead of the tie rod ends for hood tilt.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The "measuring stick" is a trammel gauge and is calibrated in both metric and inches. I've used that same gauge on automobile and truck frames for about 30 years. Wouldn't be without it. It is quite accurate with differing lengths of pointers to clear obstructions.

Glad to hear the cab is mounted correctly. The hood gap between the back of the hood panel, and the cab front where it breaks over from the horizontal, to vertical plane is about 25 millimeters with the hood closed. Along the sides it is a bit wider and I've not measured the distance.

None of my hoods protrude further than the front edges of the frame rails. I can't say for sure if a 600 series truck differs from a 700 series and I only have a single R700 model with a steel frame. The other two are aluminum frames and use the pivot pin type hinge instead of the tie rod ends for hood tilt.

Rob

Hi rob,i have been following this post,and had a question for you,i saw your measuring device,and never knew what it was called until the post,where might something like this be purchased? it looks to be very handy especially for hood alignment,collision repair etc.....thanks in advance,mark

Mack Truck literate. Computer illiterate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi rob,i have been following this post,and had a question for you,i saw your measuring device,and never knew what it was called until the post,where might something like this be purchased? it looks to be very handy especially for hood alignment,collision repair etc.....thanks in advance,mark

Hi Mark, that one is a "Mo-Clamp" brand. It is extendable out to about 15 feet if you add the sections to it. They are a body shop staple and have been for years. I have a digital one also, but don't let it leave the frame rack area. Very expensive. The manual ones run upwards of $250.00 and are solid built. Both Mo-Clamp, and Arn-Wood are good brands. Have a look at www.autobodytoolmart.com as one supplier.

All vehicles are built symetrical on jigs down the line. I mean if there is a hole at one point on/in a vehicle, there is a corresponding hole on the other side. These are key measurement points when correcting damage as you must have the same dimension, or distance between and across from each other to these points. This is where the measuring comes into play. With tolerances at +/- 1 millimeter in today's built cars, you gotta be dead on. It's no longer like the 70's when a car could be packed with shims to make things fit/align. Today's car parts either fit, or don't, with little room for error.

The modern day computers and expensive measuring systems do no better than a guy that understands the pricipals behind the method, although they can be much faster. Some computer based measuring systems track movement and record as you pull so no remeasurement is needed to check for status. This is how they are faster. They also can cost in excess of $50.000 so I kept my "measuring stick" and centerline gauges.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a few more photos with the hood closed from all angles.

Rob

Hello, thankyou for the info, it looks like the hood is fine then, I didnt like how it sat above the chassis, it seemed to far back. my biggest drama is I am using frame rails from a flintstone 69 model, a bogie drive from a 1975 F model a front spring and shackle assembly from a 1975 F model aswell as the 866 engine, the steering box and cab are from a 1989 R model, so I have bits from everything and the hood is from a 1974 R700 and a 20speed gearbox from a Kenworth.

but its getting there, this forum and everyone on it has helped tremendously.

regards Grant

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Mark, that one is a "Mo-Clamp" brand. It is extendable out to about 15 feet if you add the sections to it. They are a body shop staple and have been for years. I have a digital one also, but don't let it leave the frame rack area. Very expensive. The manual ones run upwards of $250.00 and are solid built. Both Mo-Clamp, and Arn-Wood are good brands. Have a look at www.autobodytoolmart.com as one supplier.

All vehicles are built symetrical on jigs down the line. I mean if there is a hole at one point on/in a vehicle, there is a corresponding hole on the other side. These are key measurement points when correcting damage as you must have the same dimension, or distance between and across from each other to these points. This is where the measuring comes into play. With tolerances at +/- 1 millimeter in today's built cars, you gotta be dead on. It's no longer like the 70's when a car could be packed with shims to make things fit/align. Today's car parts either fit, or don't, with little room for error.

The modern day computers and expensive measuring systems do no better than a guy that understands the pricipals behind the method, although they can be much faster. Some computer based measuring systems track movement and record as you pull so no remeasurement is needed to check for status. This is how they are faster. They also can cost in excess of $50.000 so I kept my "measuring stick" and centerline gauges.

Rob

I've been usin a yard stick all this time.... That explains alot about the 10 sperate tire tracks in the snow!!!!

B61FRED

15 gears...no waiting!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been usin a yard stick all this time.... That explains alot about the 10 sperate tire tracks in the snow!!!!

B61FRED

You wouldn't believe the amount of use I get from a 3/8ths inch wide tape measure when straightening a car too.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You wouldn't believe the amount of use I get from a 3/8ths inch wide tape measure when straightening a car too.

Rob

always wondered about this, Is it better to have the frame stripped down to align the rails or is it better to have as much assembled as posible? I have heard good points from both sides.

B61fred

15 gears...no waiting!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

always wondered about this, Is it better to have the frame stripped down to align the rails or is it better to have as much assembled as posible? I have heard good points from both sides.

B61fred

If you have the power available to apply the needed force, leave everything in place cause it is usually bent too. I'm talking collision damage only. Shit, brand new fenders out of the box don't fit without bending them a little...................

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went to a demonstration at local HS back in '96 where they had a laser alignment gizmo set up. You hang "targets" from specific points and this rotating laser measured everything. You did it while on the frame machine. Pull til it's perfect. It was a mobile unit that they were selling, basically giving you a possible business oppurtunity. You let all the local shops know you have it, they pay you to bring it in set it up for their frame work. Wasn't really stupid money, though can't recall figure.

IMG-20180116-202556-655.jpg

Larry

1959 B61 Liv'n Large......................

Charter member of the "MACK PACK"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went to a demonstration at local HS back in '96 where they had a laser alignment gizmo set up. You hang "targets" from specific points and this rotating laser measured everything. You did it while on the frame machine. Pull til it's perfect. It was a mobile unit that they were selling, basically giving you a possible business oppurtunity. You let all the local shops know you have it, they pay you to bring it in set it up for their frame work. Wasn't really stupid money, though can't recall figure.

Been a lot of updates and improvements since then. Most targets now days are magnetic with jigs to fit a manufacturer supplied hole or shape in the body or subframe. These are quite accurate but not cheap. The lesser expensive ones of less than $12,000 are fragile, or cumbersome to work with. The ones where you use an arm and pointer get old really quick. A set of centerline gauges and a calibrated eyball with the ability to read a tape measure is a lot less expensive.

I had Chief demonstrate a new laser system twice, (Velocity) once on a then new 2004 Taurus car with the front knocked off, and on a 2005 Buick Lucerne that was "T" boned in the drivers side. With these systems you pull to dimensions supplied in the database after hanging the targets and laser bar according to instruction. Then the out of tolerance conditions are displayed. You then make the appropriate pulls back to dimension until the areas out of tolerance turn green, and stop. After allowing for relaxing of the stretched metal, you check it again and sometimes need a secondary pull. Both of these cars changed dimension overnight and the measuring system needed rehung and additional pulling taken place.

At $55,000 I thought the results were not cost effective for a small shop. They also wanted $12,500 difference for a new S-21 series rack with three towers. I stayed with my Chassis Liner and still have it.

Rob

Dog.jpg.487f03da076af0150d2376dbd16843ed.jpgPlodding along with no job nor practical application for my existence, but still trying to fix what's broke.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...