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Cleaning/polishing Aluminum Diamond Plate


kennylane
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With the collective experience here, surely someone has identified an effective way to restore aluminum diamond plate. I know I've had little luck finding a product that works. Let's hear what method you guys have discovered.

Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.

Kenny Lane

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I've used a product called "Zephyr"-I think. I know it starts with a 'z', and they sell it at Truck Enterprises. It works good on tanks and wheels, and won't work you to death.

If the aluminum is really bad to start with a lot of the guys get a "brick" and put a polishing wheel on a grinder and go over it. The brick is jewelers rouge I believe, and it comes in different colors-white, green, and brown-for different levels of abrasiveness. Once you polish it with this it's easy to keep shiny with the Zephyr, or something similar.

I googled zephyr,found this site-

http://www.zephyrpro40.com/s2/Scripts/default.asp?_vsrefdom=SwiftSolution

they have the polish, buffing wheels, rouge-everything.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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I've used a product called "Zephyr"-I think. I know it starts with a 'z', and they sell it at Truck Enterprises. It works good on tanks and wheels, and won't work you to death.

If the aluminum is really bad to start with a lot of the guys get a "brick" and put a polishing wheel on a grinder and go over it. The brick is jewelers rouge I believe, and it comes in different colors-white, green, and brown-for different levels of abrasiveness. Once you polish it with this it's easy to keep shiny with the Zephyr, or something similar.

I googled zephyr,found this site-

http://www.zephyrpro40.com/s2/Scripts/default.asp?_vsrefdom=SwiftSolution

they have the polish, buffing wheels, rouge-everything.

That is a good method to use as Tom has posted and is easier to use. The brown rouge block is the more abrasive. I have gone with a chemical that can be poured on aluminum and just wash it off. If you would like to look into this their is a company called Eastwood that I have bought from that has great supplies for all of your needs. You might go on the web and search for this company. I just recently got their catalog. I have used this company back in the early 90's. Or you can go to your local body shop and inquire of help with your project.I would not grind on aluminum because it heats up the metal too much.

regards

mike

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That is a good method to use as Tom has posted and is easier to use. The brown rouge block is the more abrasive. I have gone with a chemical that can be poured on aluminum and just wash it off. If you would like to look into this their is a company called Eastwood that I have bought from that has great supplies for all of your needs. You might go on the web and search for this company. I just recently got their catalog. I have used this company back in the early 90's. Or you can go to your local body shop and inquire of help with your project.I would not grind on aluminum because it heats up the metal too much.

regards

mike

The buffing wheels that fit on the grinder are cloth-you just turn the grinder on and run it on the brick of rouge, then turn it sideways to polish so just the edge of the buffing wheel contacts the metal you're polishing. You don't need to put much pressure on it. Should work good on the diamond plate, but as I said you could probably get by with the aluminum polish, some rags, and a lot of elbow grease unless it's really bad to start with, then the buffing wheel might be the best way to go. They make smaller wheels that fit in a drill too.

Producer of poorly photo-chopped pictures since 1999.

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OK thanks guys. I'll look into some of your ideas. I spent 18 years in another career doing auto body repair and painting so I'm very familiar with the use of buffers. I thing my problem has been that I've not been using the right product on the pad. Fell free to weigh in if you have other ideas.

Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.

Kenny Lane

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The key to metal polishing is to let the polish do the work.

If the aluminum is corroded and etched bad enough to need sandpaper

and abrasive buffing, those are steps that take place prior to polishing,

obviously.

One of the little tricks that I have seen used on diamond plate, which is a little more difficult

to shine than polishing flat stock, is to use a piece of a good thick carpet.

A scrap about 8" square is manageable. Almost any brand name polish is fine. Just keep rubbing.

The blacker the residue, the better job you are doing.

Mother's has a couple of "Powerball" foam polishing tools available for use in a cordless drill.

These are a big help, although they don't last too long on the diamond plate.

Polishing metal is a pretty rewarding job. The results are always good to see.

But - After finishing one of Jimmy's W-900's recently - I like my all painted Macks pretty well!

Paul Van Scott

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The key to metal polishing is to let the polish do the work.

If the aluminum is corroded and etched bad enough to need sandpaper

and abrasive buffing, those are steps that take place prior to polishing,

obviously.

One of the little tricks that I have seen used on diamond plate, which is a little more difficult

to shine than polishing flat stock, is to use a piece of a good thick carpet.

A scrap about 8" square is manageable. Almost any brand name polish is fine. Just keep rubbing.

The blacker the residue, the better job you are doing.

Mother's has a couple of "Powerball" foam polishing tools available for use in a cordless drill.

These are a big help, although they don't last too long on the diamond plate.

Polishing metal is a pretty rewarding job. The results are always good to see.

But - After finishing one of Jimmy's W-900's recently - I like my all painted Macks pretty well!

Paul Van Scott

Yea Paul I have found that the diamond plate eats up pretty much everything in the form of a pad if you use it on a buffer or drill. I really wish that my truck had been all steel so that I could paint too.

Character is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.

Kenny Lane

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