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joemac

Porch Pup
  • Content Count

    83
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About joemac

  • Rank
    Old Iron Expert
  • Birthday 02/29/1952

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    SE Pa.
  • Interests
    Mack fire apparatus, vintage motorcycles, guitars, drums, music of the sixties, model car and truck building, Porsche & VW cars, vintage trucks, tennis, football

Previous Fields

  • Other Trucks
    I don't own a truck :-(

Recent Profile Visitors

916 profile views
  1. Trying to help out a fire truck museum who needs a head gasket for a '55 International with a Red Diamond engine. So far, I'm striking out, which surprises me, given how many of these trucks were on the road when I was growing up. Any ideas?
  2. Thanks. The only oil leakage is a little seepage from what would be valve covers on a four-stroke, not even enough to cause a drip. I plan on changing all of the filters at oil change time, probably next week. Taking care of the brakes and tires, first.
  3. Thanks. I failed to mention that I have a copy of the factory DD 6V53 manual that I've been studying. The operator's manual for the ALF is very limited, mostly addressing the V-12 that it originally had. It has precious little in regards to everything else. I'm already a SPAAMFAA member and in touch with a handful of ALF owners. It seems we all go through the same frustration of not having printed info to use. My intention all along has been to go through the entire rig, starting with the brake system. I'm hoping to install a tandem master cylinder in place of the single unit that was installed in 1947.
  4. 1982 450 NightHawk. Weight and handling the thing off/on the front porch was a major consideration... I love the bike. It's plenty fast enough to get into trouble, lightweight, easy on fuel and repairs/maintenance are a breeze. I'd gone 36 years without. 2012 found me deciding to give in to the annual fever I'd get and I found this little project waiting to go back on the road, having sat since 1985 with 12,300 on her. Except for tires, paint and a few cosmetic things, it's all original. Still has the factory-installed plugs in it. I knew what I was going to do when I decided to bring her home. It carries a fire engine theme and gets a fair amount of approval and compliments. She is my therapist.
  5. Hey Gang, I had to give up on the '58 Mack C I was trying to acquire. It wasn't in the cards, I guess. I recently bought a '47 American La France 700 Pumper from upstate NY in decent shape. It was re-powered in the '70s with a DD 6V-53 that starts right up and sounds healthy. A couple of experienced guys said it sounds really good. (Stay out of this, Yardo!) I'm going to go through a routine maintenance on the engine and the rest of the rig is going to be gone through thoroughly. The brakes are nonfunctional at the moment. The rear shoes appear to be hanging up when reversing. My immediate plan is to get the rear wheels off the ground, one at a time and start going through everything from there. The problem I have is that I've been used to having a manual to work from with most things I've worked on. I have the operator's manual in PDF form, but it's extremely limited in its scope, focusing mainly on the V-12 that isn't in this rig. Does anyone know of a good repair/maintenance manual for these old rigs? Failing that, any online sources of repair info? Keep in mind that I know my way around tools, having spent the last 45 years or so fixing cars. I do know a wheel cylinder when I see one. Thanks for any assistance.
  6. Thanks, I'll check that out. Now, how do I flip photos back to where they should be? Stupid computers.
  7. I'm now the owner of a 1947 American La france 775 PGC Pumper, originally serving Albion, NY for all of its service. We brought her down from upstate NY to SE Pa., last week. I'll try posting a photo, but they always seem to get flipped sideways and I can't fix 'em. This pumper was re-powered in the 70s with a Detroit 6V53 that starts right up and sounds healthy. The only diesel experience I have is some training @ VW of America, back in the 70s into the 80s. I've repaired hundreds of diesel Rabbits, probably replacing a hundred head gaskets over the years. Still have my tools, but haven't touched one in years. I understand the concept, but this is a new world for me. It's big, heavy, a six-banger and a two-stroke. Very different, for me. I was fortunate enough with the purchase to obtain a factory manual with the rig and I'm looking forward to spending some quality time with it. Where is the best place to post questions regarding this engine? TIA
  8. I was hoping this thread would help me to find suitable replacement 'old school' tires for a '47 ALF that I'm buying. I've been all over the Web and searched locally. It seems there are no USA tires being made for vintage rigs and anything that is available is not going to have the look of older tires. Oh well. Incidentally, radials are no guarantee against flat spots. Depending on the compound, they can flat as badly, or worse, than bias ply sneakers.
  9. Thanks, that's good to know. I'm just concerned that I won't be able to go over 45 and it will take forever to get to any musters that are usually a couple of hours away. And, my ears are already ringing. Too many years of abuse will do that.
  10. I'm a little late to this party, but it fits my situation. I'm in the process of buying a '47 700 pumper that was re-powered with a 6v53 that seems to run well. What I know of Diesels is from working with VW, so I know the concept and realize the difference from gasoline engines. I will be giving this DD a proper major maintenance, as well as everything else on the rig. But, will I be able to drive it? It concerns me that I will likely be looking into swapping out the rear. How complicated is this going to be? Can the gears be changed out or is the whole rear end going to be replaced? I was hoping to retain as much original as possible, at least what can be seen. If going the used school bus rear route, what's involved? Anything I know about conventional drive trucks is from a distance. I've been a rear-engine, air-cooled car guy for four and a half decades, don't know much about front engine, rear drive. Basics and what I caught from my buddies in high school. Thanks
  11. I would avoid trying to turn it over until it is known what the problem is. If it is rust in one or more cylinders and you force it, you may very well break any number of piston rings. You really don't want to do that. Follow the advice you've been given and systematically find out the cause of the lockup. You might just get lucky and get away with just having to do some routine maintenance like changing the oil and plugs. Don't guess and don't force things.
  12. I put a pair of gloves on this morning to do some yardwork and felt something itching the back of my right hand, at the base of the two small fingers. I scratched it a couple of times and then realized it was getting worse. Much worse. I removed the glove, turning it inside-out as I did, finding a white fuzzy caterpillar that was in there. I quickly stopped on it. Animal rights and PETA, be damned! My fingers, as well as a large portion of the back of my hand swelled up and the itching turned to itching/burning/stinging like nothing I've ever experienced before. I've been stung by all the usual; bees, yellow jackets, wasps, hornets and never had a reaction like this. This took place at about 9:30 AM. It is now 10:00 PM and it's still swollen and itching like I can't believe. I looked it up and found it to be the White Hickory Tussock Moth Caterpillar. Be on the lookout for these and don't let your kids play with them. This is the worst reaction I've ever had to an insect. http://www.asktheexterminator.com/Caterpillars/Hickory_Tussock_Moth.shtml
  13. joemac

    New Baby

    Man, talk about a thread hijacking... Hey Mike, when can I come up and see your new arrival?
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