85snowdog

Ol' Loadstar headlights

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I've been working on my '76 Loadstar, and curiosity has got the best of me.

The fuse panel does not have a spot for headlights. Thinking there has to be some kind of protection against a short , I took out all the fuses.

With all the fuses out the headlights still work. I looked all over for relays . Under dash and on firewall. Can't find anything.

Am I missing something obvious ?  

I thought I would try the minds here because I know there is lots of binder knowledge here as well. 

Thanks in advance 

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Several of the older vehicles used fusible link wiring in the headlamp circuit among other places too. It will carry a rated amount of current and burn open in a short circuit. Others used a glass fuse mounted to the headlamp switch itself although I think that setup is earlier than your truck.

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Thanks for the reply Rob.  I had the headlight switch out, it doesn't have the fuse . It appears that the wiring has never been molested with . So maybe it is fuseible link wiring , like you say .  

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Yes it would be. Most likely 14gauge wiring which will be physically larger than most of the other wiring in the circuit.

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I would say it is around 14 gauge .

Everything works fine. Do you think I should leave things alone? Make sure I'm up to date on my fire insurance. lol 

Or would a fusible link be a good idea on the power line into the headlight switch ?

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I still think they are a good idea. If not they wouldn't be used in newer automobiles still. They tend to burn open on very short order and do not allow a simple larger fuse replacement when there is a problem. If your connections are clean, tight, and have otherwise good integrity, I'd leave them be. Don't run fusible links inside the passenger compartment; only under the hood.

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2 minutes ago, Rob said:

I still think they are a good idea. If not they wouldn't be used in newer automobiles still. They tend to burn open on very short order and do not allow a simple larger fuse replacement when there is a problem. If your connections are clean, tight, and have otherwise good integrity, I'd leave them be. Don't run fusible links inside the passenger compartment; only under the hood.

Why do you say only under the hood?

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12 minutes ago, h67st said:

Why do you say only under the hood?

When they burn open they smoke with a permeating smell that is hard to get out of interior, clothes, skin, etc.

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Check the wires coming off the starter for a fuse. Lots of times there is a dedicated wire coming from there for the headlights. 

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Thanks Dirtymilkman , I will look at that later today. 

 

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Do post what you find as I'm thinking that wiring type from the starter was done away with in the late 1960's. It was troublesome on plow trucks which were aplenty around here into the mid 1970's.

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Upon further investigation , there doesn't seem to be any type of fuse off of the starter. 

So it seems that the protection is from fusible link wiring . 

Thanks guys 

 

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